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Domain Winter 2013
Exhibits & Events

Mar. 18 - Jun. 29
"A Nation of Readers."
Geisel Library exhibit.
For more information:
Webpage.

Mar. 25 - Jun. 29
"On Top of the World: 50
Years of Americans on Mount Everest."
Geisel Library Exhibit.
For more information:
Webpage.

Apr. 17 - Jun. 10
"Amoz Oz: Life and Letters."
Geisel Library Exhibit.
For more information:
Webpage.

Apr. 17 - Jun. 14
"Beyond the Checkbox."
Geisel Library Exhibit.
For more information:
Webpage.

May 1 - Jun. 20
"Silent Era Filmmaking of
the La Jolla Cinema League."
Geisel Library Exhibit.
5 - 7 p.m.
For more information:
(858) 822-5758
Webpage.

May 6 - May 31
"Remembering Sir Arthur C. Clarke."
Geisel Library Exhibit.
For more information:
(858) 534 - 0667
Webpage.

May 22
"Engineering Origami."
Talk by Robert J. Lang.
Geisel Library,
Seuss Room.
For more information:
Webpage.

May 25
"Silent Era Filmmaking
of the La Jolla Cinema League."
Movie Screening. 3 p.m.
Geisel Library,
Seuss Room.
For more information:
(858) 822 -5758
Webpage.

May 29
"The Force of Things:
A Marriage in War and Peace."
Talk by Alexander Stille.
Holocaust Living
History Workshop.
Geisel Library,
Seuss Room.
5 - 7 p.m.
For more information:
(858) 534-7661
Webpage.

June 5
"Surviving Auschwitz."
Talk by Livia Krancberg.
Holocaust Living
History Workshop.
Geisel Library,
Seuss Room.
5 - 7 p.m.
For more information:
(858) 534-7661
Webpage.

Domain Editor
Dolores Davies
Suggestions or feedback?
Contact us at
domainnews@ucsd.edu
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Spring 2013   Volume 3 Number 3  
BECS HEADSHOT WINTER

Dear Friends,

As the quarter draws to a close on campus - finals begin on June 1! - I'd like to call your attention to some noteworthy Library events and activities that might warrant a visit to Geisel Library. This issue of Domain includes a report on a fascinating talk given by Dr. Joel Dimsdale, a UC San Diego professor emeritus of psychiatry, about his examination of the various attempts after WWII to understand the psyche of the Nazi leadership. If you missed Joel's talk, which was part of our Holocaust Living History Workshop, you can watch it on UCSD-TV next month. See the article for more information on the taping and Joel's compelling account.

On September 12, 2013, the Library will be holding its annual Dinner in the Library, our signature fundraising event. This year's special guest speaker will be the prolific and gifted Jay Parini, who is known for his novels as well as his poetry, biographies, and criticism. Jay is the author of the best-selling novel tracing Leo Tolstoy's last days, The Last Station, which was adapted for the screen in 2009 and was nominated for several Academy Awards. Jay has also written highly-acclaimed biographical works on Herman Melville, William Faulkner, Robert Frost, and John Steinbeck. His talk at our Dinner in the Library will draw from his book, Promised Land: Thirteen Books That Changed America, which he describes as "nodal points, places where vast areas of thought and feeling gathered and dispersed." This promises to make for a thought-provoking and entertaining evening-I hope you will join us.

Sincerely,

Brian E. C. Schottlaender

The Audrey Geisel University Librarian

Dinner in the Library

Renowned Novelist To Discuss Books That Changed America

Jay Parini
Jay Parini

An eclectic assortment of books ranging from The Federalist Papers to Uncle Tom's Cabin or Jack Kerouac's On the Road to Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique, will be examined by distinguished poet, novelist, and critic Jay Parini in his talk, "Books that Changed America," during the annual Dinner in the Library on September 12, 2013.

Based on his book, Promised Land: Thirteen Books that Changed America, Parini's talk will illustrate how these books were first received by American readers, how their reputations have changed, and how they shaped later writers and thinkers. As one example, Parini demonstrates that The Commonsense Book of Baby and Child Care, better known as the Dr. Spock book, offered clearheaded guidance to young parents who found themselves isolated from traditional networks of support with the great migration to the suburbs after World War II. Later, when Spock became a figure in the nuclear-disarmament movement, he became a convenient target by those who needed someone to blame for what seemed to be an entire generation's rush to anarchy.

Click here to read more.
Collector Q&A – Nick Ervin

Exploring the New World

Collector Nick Ervin with an 1877 volume of Clarence King's Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel
Collector Nick Ervin with an 1877 volume of Clarence King's Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel

Nick Ervin treasures the many dozens of rare books on North American overland expeditions that reside on shelves throughout his home. They speak to his twin passions of bibliophilia (he began browsing library sales as a child on vacation in New England) and conservation (he was a principal local organizer of the California Desert Protection Act of 1994). But Ervin doesn't feel pride of ownership in his holdings as such. He sees book collecting as an act of stewardship, and he likes to imagine how future caretakers of his books will one day, as he does now, relive epic continental history through the majestic words and images on these luminous pages.

Q. What is that primary focus of your collection? 

A. I started with books under the topic of Western Americana, but in recent years I have broadened my scope to include overland travel and exploration accounts covering all the United States, as well as Canada, from 1750 to 1890. My wife happens to be Canadian and I feel some affinity for our great northern neighbor; plus, some of the most exciting early explorations were in Canada.

Click here to read more.

Joel Dimsdale on the Anatomy of Malice

A Psychiatrist's Examination of the Nazi Mind

Image from the Rorschach Test

Image from the Rorschach Test

Were the Nazi leaders despicable mass murderers with no empathy for other humans? Amoral and weak men who became mere tools of the Nazi bureaucratic machinery? Or, were they normal men who felt ambivalence about their actions, but were victims of circumstance, compelled to carry out orders?

On April 3, Dr. Joel Dimsdale, a UC San Diego professor emeritus of psychiatry, delivered a chilling yet fascinating talk about the psychology of the Nazi leadership and the efforts made by psychiatrists to understand what motivated them to commit such atrocities. Dimsdale's presentation, Anatomy of Malice: Rorschach Results from Nuremberg War Criminals, was part of the Holocaust Living History Workshop series, a collaboration of the UC San Diego Library and the Judaic Studies Program. The program will appear on UCSD-TV on Monday, June 10 at 8 p.m.

Click here to read more.

Special Collections Exhibit

"A Nation of Readers" Traces History of Reading in U.S.

Dime Store Novels

Dime Store Novels

In her 1832 book, Domestic Manners of the Americans, English novelist and travel writer Frances Trollope caustically opined of America that "it's the impression of many that the country is largely unlettered and unread. The immense exhalation of periodical trash which permeates to every cot and corner of the country," she wrote, "is unquestionably one great cause of its inferiority."

Calling into question Mrs. Trollope's acerbic writings is an exhibition, "A Nation of Readers," on display on the main floor of Geisel Library thorough June 30, 2013. The exhibition of books, pamphlets, manuscripts, newspapers and other materials from UC San Diego's Mandeville Special Collections Library illustrates the significance of reading in American life from the colonial period to the present.

Click here to read more.

Student Spotlight - Jordan Haug

Budding Anthropologist Wins Prestigious Award

Jordan Haug

Jordan Haug, a Ph. D. candidate in
Anthropology, traces his love for books and his fascination with distant lands and cultures to his youth, when, as a boy of 11, he stumbled upon the only three English language books available in a Tokyo public library. Feeling alienated after a recent move to Japan from his stridently Christian hometown in Texas, Haug was inspired by the brave new worlds opened up to him in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Ruth Benedict's The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, and Margaret Mead's Growing up in New Guinea.

Click here to read more.

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http://libraries.ucsd.edu/

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Masthead image:  Read/Write/Think/Dream installation by John Baldessari at Geisel Library.  UCSD Stuart Collection 2001.