Digital Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive Acquired by UCSD Library

A rich digital archive documenting the UFW Farmworkers’ Movement in Central California from 1962 to 1993 has been acquired by the University of California, San Diego Library. The archive, which was developed by LeRoy Chatfield, includes a wide variety of information on the activities, accomplishments, challenges, and work of Cesar Chavez and the farmworkers who participated in the farmworker movement.

“In a world that has become increasingly digital, it makes perfect sense for libraries to acquire born-digital archives, especially when excellent opportunities like this present themselves,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “Given the strengths of our collections in terms of California and Baja California history, the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive is an outstanding addition to our holdings. LeRoy Chatfield has done a tremendous amount of important work in building this expansive website, and now, as part of the Library’s collection, it will be preserved and made broadly accessible to future generations of scholars and students.”

The Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive, which can now be accessed on the Library’s website, comprises thousands of items documenting the United Farmworkers’ (UFW) history and related events, including a timeline of significant milestones, oral histories, and manuscripts, as well as essays, and poetry penned by volunteers. Also included are 13,000 photographs, videos—including a short video on the farmworker union (NFWA/UFW) historic march to Sacramento in 1966—and a variety of art and images of cultural artifacts such as stamps, posters, paintings, and illustrations.

From 1962 to 1993, Cesar Chavez, founding president of the UFW, dedicated himself to organizing a farmworker movement in Central California. Although Chavez is renowned as an historic labor leader, Chatfield, a longtime Christian Brother and humanitarian who worked with Chavez from 1963 to 1973, said his vision began with, but stretched beyond the workers in the fields.

“Cesar Chavez’s vision for the farmworker movement encompassed far more than organizing a union,” said Chatfield. “His status as a revered icon has less to do with his union activities than with the personal sacrifices, commitment to nonviolence, and deep religious conviction that marked his life of service to impoverished farmworkers. I’m very pleased that his story—and the many stories of those involved in the farmworker movement—will now be maintained as part of the UC San Diego Library’s collections.”

Chatfield first met Chavez in 1963, and the two became close friends, bonding over their mutual commitment to and compassion for the farmworkers who labored in the Delano, California fields, picking grapes and other produce. Chavez asked Chatfield to work for him when the Delano Grape Strike began in 1965, and he continued to serve under his leadership until 1973, when he relocated to Sacramento.

Although Chavez’s death in 1993 brought an end to the farmworker movement, it reunited Chatfield with dozens of former UFW colleagues and brought back “floods of fond memories,” he recalled, “regarding my association with Cesar Chavez and his movement.” In 1994, Chatfield published a “private memoir” recounting his experiences with Chavez,Cesar 1968, now part of the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive site. After he retired as executive director of Sacramento Loaves & Fishes in 2000, Chatfield became inspired to document the farmworker movement, after reading a New York Times article lamenting the fact that the history of much of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s had gone undocumented, with many stories lost to the dustbin of history.

“Thousands of people were actively involved in the Civil Rights Movement but barely a fraction of their stories were told,” said Chatfield. “Because so much time had passed, their stories would never be told and preserved for future generations. This fact made me realize that I too had been immersed in a similar movement, and I knew at least 50 others like myself who had been involved. I realized I was well positioned to document Cesar Chavez’s farmworker movement and began to feel obligated to do so.”

“The Farmworker Movement Documentation Project is a labor of love and commitment accomplished by one man—LeRoy Chatfield,” said Literature Professor Jorge Mariscal, director of UC San Diego’s Chicano/a~Latino/a Arts & Humanities program. “But like the farmworker movement itself, one man stands in for the hundreds of dedicated contributors whose words and images live on in the archive. This will be a major research and educational tool for generations to come. Brian Schottlaender and the UC San Diego Library deserve high praise for acquiring this one-of-a-kind treasure trove of California history.”

What started as the Farmworker Movement Documentation Project in book form, morphed into an online presence in 2004, when Chatfield was introduced to a young woman, Jennifer Szabo, who possessed the requisite web skills needed to organize and present all the materials Chatfield was collecting in a digital format.

“I had amassed a large amount of farmworker movement primary source documents and materials,” said Chatfield. “Moving this project to the Internet enabled us to include oral histories, videos, photographs, artwork, cartoons, and buttons—a veritable multimedia presentation of the farmworker movement, an historical documentation of a 31-year social movement and the largest website of its kind.”

Media Contact

Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667,ddavies@ucsd.edu

Unveiling of Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive

UC San Diego Press Release

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Recycle Your Used Pens @ The Library

Did you know the UC San Diego Library has an Environmental Sustainability Group? It collaborates with campus to implement ideas that help to create sustainable facilities at UCSD.  In the Geisel Library and Biomedical Library Buildings recycle your used pens with us. Funds earned support the UC San Diego Sustainability Resource Center!

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Thinking Big with Geoff Bowker

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Stay Connected to The Library!

Next time you login to your favorite account, say hello and stay connected! We regularly post library news, photos, event and exhibit information, videos, contests, author talks and more!  library.ucsd.edu/connectSocialMedia_PromoCard_digitial image QR code

 

Look up Course Reserves on Your Mobile Device

Quick Tip: Look up course reserves on your mobile device without having to wait in line for a look-up station in the Library!  CourseReserves Mobile Lookup

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Research Smarter: Spring Quarter Workshops @ The Library

We offer a variety of free workshops designed to help you research more efficiently and effectively.   ETS05

Spring quarter learn how to manage citations using RefWorks or Endnote, search for and find patents, maximize the power of Excel, and find research literature using the PubMed database.   Browse the full schedule and register for workshops online.

Try a workshop and research smarter with us!

Mozart’s humors: Cultural and clinical problems of retrospective diagnosis

On May 8 from 2-3:30 pm, Henry C. Powell will speak about “Mozart’s humors: Cultural and clinical problems of retrospective diagnosis” in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library.

Over 140 medical and neurobehavioral diagnoses have been attached to Mozart, despite the fact that very few of them were in the clinical lexicon during his lifetime.  Even rheumatic fever was differently understood by Mozart’s physicians, who didn’t know how this immune-inflammatory disorder ravaged the heart and exposed its internal structure to future infectious disease.   Retrospective neurobehavioral diagnoses, in particular, seem especially risky because they presume to understand Mozart’s times but they don’t. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome has been suggested for Mozart by several clinical specialists, however the diagnosis is based in part on scatological language that is viewed as offensive in our time, but appeared to be commonplace in Mozart’s day.  Were Mozart to be censured for vernacular speech, then he would be in the company of Martin Luther, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Joseph and Michael Haydn, just to name a distinguished few whose German culture didn’t proscribe frank imagery related to human waste.  Towards the end of Mozart’s life the “romantic era” was emerging, indeed some of his works such as the Piano Concerto in D Minor, K.466 prefigured it.  At this time a different view of mental health entered the popular imagination.  Behavioral disturbances began to be perceived as potential sources of creativity, along with the notion that disease might confer some kind of advantage or otherwise explain unusual creativity.  In the end, the consensus among medical biographers is that Mozart had lifelong exposure to infectious diseases and the long-term consequences of infection as well as poor dental health offer the most reasonable explanation for his early death. His musical genius is less easily explained by neurobehavioral analyses, such as attribution of diagnoses of disorders such as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, Asperger’s syndrome, attention deficit disorder and other conditions.  No other composer has attracted so much posthumous diagnostic attention and perhaps this is an expression of enduring regret that Mozart’s life was cut short just before his 36th birthday.

Dr. Powell is Professor of Emeritus of Pathology (Neuropathology) and directs the Clinical Electron Microscopy service at UC San Diego Medical Center.  He teaches medical and pharmacy students at UCSD and also gives lectures periodically at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.  Dr. Powell’s interests include the history of medicine as well as the history of recorded music.

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Earth Week DIY Makers Day

The Library and the Environmental Sustainability Group is hosting a DIY Makers Day celebrating Earth Week on campus, using sustainable, non-toxic, reusable, and recyclable materials. Maker stations include:

  • make your own cleaning supplies (be extra green and bring your own container!)
  • make your own button using recycled book covers
  • make boxes and bookmarks using recycled paper
  • plant a succulent
  • watch a demonstration of a 3D Printer (vegetable-based plastic!)

Check out our educational resource tables.  Participants will leave with a sample of a project and ideas to continue making eco-friendly products and reusing consumables on a daily basis!

Tuesday, April 22nd
11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library

Refreshments will be served!
Open to the public!

Stay tuned for a contest featuring our 3D printer!

If you have questions, please contact Kimberly Schwenk (kschwenk@ucsd.edu)

Categories: Events & Exhibits Tags: , , , Comments: 2

UC San Diego Library Celebrates National Poetry Month

This April, the UC San Diego Library will celebrate National Poetry Month by providing a space for poets, both published and unpublished, to share and talk about their work.  This is our first year doing this, and we are pleased by the amount of response. We have some local poets, as well as poets from as far afield as Ontario, Canada. UC San Diego Library would like to thank this year’s participants, and all poets, for keeping the craft alive.

For a live event honoring National Poetry Month please join us in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library on April 2 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. for a mini-marathon reading sponsored by the Department of Literature, the New Writing Series, and the UC San Diego Library.

 

Amanda Chiado:

Amanda Chiado is a writer and educator from Hollister, California. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts in San Francisco. Her work has appeared in Best New Poets: 50 Poems from Emerging Writers, Fence, Dusie, Cranky, and Line4.

Myron Michael:

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Myron Michael is a publisher, recording artist, and writing teacher. His poetry appears in a number of journals including Nanomajority, Toad Suck Review, Harvard Review Online, Eleven Eleven, Cave Canem XII, Spillway, Days I Moved Through Ordinary Sounds (City Lights, 2009), and Fourteen Hills. His chapbook Scatter Plot won the 2010 Willow Books Integral Music Chapbook Prize, and he is co-author of Hang Man (Move Or Die, 2010). Born and raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan, he considers the San Francisco Bay Area his second home.

Rachel Winchester:

Rachel Winchester

Rachel Winchester is a poet and choreographer in the second year of her Master’s Program for Dance at University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon. In this video she talks about her early writing process, as well as reading some of her work

 

 Chris Vannoy:

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Chris Vannoy has been a staple of the San Diego, California writing and arts scene for the last twenty years. He has performed his work at a variety of venues: from gallery readings curated by Quincy Troupe, to Lollapalooza, to your average coffeehouse open mic.

 

 Heidi Andrea Restrepo Rhodes:

 Heidi RR

Heidi Andrea Restrepo Rhodes is a Queer Feminist Colombian Mestiza; writer, scholar, artist, and political activist. Her performances, creative writing, and photography have been seen or are forthcoming in places such as San Francisco’s SomArts, Galería de la Raza, the SICK Collective, Veils, Halos and Shackles: International Poetry on the Abuse and Oppression of Women, Brown and Proud Press, The Blue Lyra Review, The Progressive, Mobius: A Journal for Social Change, Yellow Medicine Review, From the Ground Up, and others. Her scholarship and advocacy are focused on human rights and social justice in Colombia and the United States. She currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

 

 Alex Bosworth:

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Alex Bosworth is a satirist, internet comedian, and spoken-word performer from San Diego, California. His collection of stories Chip, Chip, Chaw was published in 2012 by Renegade Muses Press. In this performance excerpt he has a little bit of fun with Edward Lear’s The Owl and the Pussycat.

 

Andrew Maranzanor (A. Razor):

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Andrew Maranzanor (A. Razor) is a spoken word performer from Lost Angeles, California. He is editor/publisher for Punk Hostage Press, an independent press out of Hollywood. The following poem was read in San Francisco, California at “Poems Under the Dome,” a poetry performance inside San Francisco City Hall

 

Alexandra Naughton:

Alexandra Naughton is a poet living in Oakland, California. The following videos were created to promote her book I Will Always Be Your Whore (Love Songs for Billy Corgan) released in 2013 from Punk Hostage Press. She describes the project as “More than fan fiction, this is the creation of a new pop culture.”

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The following two poet entries come to us from Wisconsin. Hippie Rick and Margaret Rozga took part in a demonstration in the Wisconsin capitol building where many of the protestors were arrested for participating in an act of civil disobedience involving ongoing singing, called The Solidarity Sing Along. Both poems were included in the anthology chapbook called Turn Up the Volume: Poems about the States of Wisconsin published in 2013. The proceeds were used for a legal defense fund for Solidarity Sing Along.

Hippie Rick performing the poem Sing On

Margaret Rozga performing the poem The State of Wisconsin

 

 Marissa Bell Toffoli:

Marissa Bell Toffoli

Marissa Bell Toffoli is an editor and creative writing teacher from Berkeley, California. She publishes interviews with writers online at Words With Writers. Marissa holds an MFA in Writing from California College of the Arts and is the poetry editor for Exterminating Angel Press: The Magazine. Her e-chapbook, Under the Jacaranda, is available from TheWriteDeal.

 

JC Olsthoorn:

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JC Olsthoorn is a poet and painter born and raised outside of Montreal, Quebec and now lives and works in Ottawa, Ontario. Writing poetry for close to forty years, John’s poems have been published in literary magazines and in a chapbook, ‘as hush as us’ (1980).

 

 D. Russel Micnhimer:

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Our last poet is D. Russel Micnhimer reading his work THE BEAUTY OF OREGON: A HEROIC CROWN OF SONNETS. A heroic crown is a poetic form which is concerned with a single theme. Each of the sonnets explores one aspect of the theme, and is linked to the preceding and succeeding sonnets by repeating the final line of the preceding sonnet as its first line. The first line of the first sonnet is repeated as the final line of the final sonnet, thereby bringing the sequence to a close.

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