Innovative Library Spaces For Teaching Assistants and Apprentices

Meet up in the Library…

Teaching Assistants and Teaching Apprentices have the opportunity schedule office hours or drop in review sessions in the Library. Reservations are still available for the consultation cubicles in the East Learning Commons are still available for Spring Quarter.

Students, if you would like your TA to meet you in the Library, let them know about this service.

Visit our webpage for details http://libraries.ucsd.edu/services/ta-instructors/index.html or Learning Spaces Program’s Outreach Specialist Dorthea Stewart, at dsstewart@ucsd.edu or 858.534.8378 for reservations.

Space Offerings

The Geisel TA/Instructor Consultations Area currently offers a round table & 3 chairs in a semi-private area. Mobile whiteboards are available in the surrounding area that can be used, as needed. While no computer is available, wireless and powered outlets are available.

The BLB Consultations Area is in Room 201, beyond the book stacks on the 2nd floor.  It offers a large table with chairs and a wall-mounted whiteboard in a small room.  While no computer is available, wireless and powered outlets are available.

We welcome any suggestions about additional equipment that might be useful in the spaces.

Nikon Lenses Donated for Tech Lending

lenses
The Library Technology Checkout Program has received a donation of 7 high end Nikon 85mm and 135mm (with defocus) lenses, left over from a Google book scanning project.

We’ll be adding these and 5 new Nikon D7000s to our checkout program at the start of Fall quarter.

 

Send questions or comments to LSPtech@ucsd.edu

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Checkout Laptops @ Biomedical Library Building!

laptop

There are 5 wireless equipped laptops available for checkout at the Biomedical Library Building! These laptops can be checked out by UC San Diego students, staff, and faculty for up to 3 hours at a time. For questions or assistance contact BLB front desk staff at (858) 534-3253

Copy Text from Online Images (In-Browser OCR)

 

bradbury-paste

 

Text recognition is a hugely important capability, and it’s getting easier. Check out this new Google Chrome extension allowing text copying, translating, and even editing within a browser window.

https://projectnaptha.com/

Categories: Technology Tips Comments: 0

Geisel Library Lego Model

 

800-anim

A Scottish software engineer created this beautiful digital lego model of the Geisel Library. The model includes  117000 individual lego pieces (It’d cost tens of thousands of dollars to make in real life).

 

Check out the designer’s sites for videos and close-up interior pictures.

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/401658

http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?f=550407

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Missing: The Fate of the Nazi Concentration Camp Archives

jj

Don’t miss the final Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) of the 2014-2015 academic year on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 in the Seuss Room of the Geisel Library from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

The workshop, The Fate of the Nazi Concentration Camp Archives, will feature J.J. Surbeck, a Swiss-educated attorney who served 16 years with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

The ICRC was founded in 1863 as a private Swiss organization, striving to ensure protection and assistance for victims of armed conflict and help reunite POWs and uprooted civilians with their families. In 1864, it persuaded governments to adopt the first Geneva Convention, the treaty that required armies to care for wounded soldiers, whatever side they were on.

With the Nazi conquest of most of Europe resulting in the displacement of millions of individuals, the British Red Cross and the ICRC began working together to trace victims of incarceration, forced labor, and relocation in 1943. This effort eventually led to the establishment of the

International Tracing Service (ITS), which is now a massive archive in Bad Arolsen, Germany containing 30 million records on the survivors and victims of the Nazi concentration camps.

Surbeck will discuss the inter-workings and history of the ICRC and the role it played in WWII. This event is free and open to the public. No reservation necessary. Refreshments will be served.

For more information about the HLHW, which is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and Judaic Studies Program, please contact Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

‘San Diego Welcomes the World’ Salutes Centenary of Panama–California Exposition of 1915

PanamaExhibit-6v2

San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, which commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal, and launched the City as an international venue. The construction of the Panama Canal was an immense engineering feat, dramatically cutting the distance and cost of international shipping by opening a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It also proved to be an excellent opportunity for enhancing San Diego’s profile–as it would become the first port north of the Panama Canal on the West Coast of the United States.  The event also provided San Diego leaders with the impetus for transforming Balboa Park from an undeveloped, arid property, into a lush and distinctly Spanish paradise. The 1915 Exposition led to both the greening of Balboa Park as well as the creation of the park’s cultural institutions and stunning Spanish Revival architecture.

The exhibition, which is on display on the main floor in Geisel Library (2nd floor, West Wing) until July 5, 2015, includes images of some of the few permanent structures designed for the fair, including the California Tower and dome, the Cabrillo Bridge, and the Spreckels Organ Pavilion. Other items in the exhibit include souvenir books and postcards, newspaper articles, sheet music, a special student admittance pass, maps of the Canal, and more.

New Popular Science Books – May 2015

Some recent additions to our Popular Science Collection, shelved in Geisel 2 West. You can browse the new titles online, then click the book cover to see if the book’s available. If not, you can place a request in the catalog to have the book recalled and have it held for you when it’s returned.

may2015books

Library Workshops – NCBI Resources, SciFinder, Patents, PubMed

This month’s hands-on workshops to learn more about some of the best resources for your science and engineering research. Classes are free, but registration is strongly encouraged. Note that some classes are in the Geisel Library Building, and others are at the Biomedical Library Building.

 

The UC San Diego Library is hosting a live-streaming webinar from the University of Michigan’s National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Discovery Workshops, which will be held May 5 & 6. Each 2.5-hour session consists of hands-on work emphasizing a different set of NCBI resources, using specific examples to highlight important features of the resources and tools. The workshops will be broadcast in the Biomedical Library’s Classroom 3, and computers are available.

Gene Expression Resources at the NCBI (register)
May 5 (Tues),
Biomed Lib Bldg, Classroom 3
10:00 – 12:30 pm

You will find, display and analyze microarray and sequence-based expression data that are stored in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Sequence Read Archive (SRA), UniGene, and Epigenomics databases to investigate the potential for expression of transcript splice variants and examine the levels of expression under varied experimental conditions as well as in different tissues and disease states. You will analyze Microarray data the on-demand GEO2R tool and will explore the precomputed transcript analyses that are displayed on the UniGene and GEO Profiles pages. You will explore genome-aligned RNA-Seq data through the Gene database’s sequence viewer displays and analyze raw RNA-Seq reads in the SRA database using NCBI’s SRA-BLAST service.

NCBI Genomes, Assemblies and Annotation Products: Microbiome to Human (register)
May 6 (Wed),
Biomed Lib Bldg, Classroom 3
10:00 – 12:30 pm

NCBI BioProject, BioSample, Genomes and Assembly databases Annotation products from the Eukaryotic and Microbial genome annotation pipelines Environmental and organismal metagenomes Accessing wgs data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) Specialized genomic and SRA BLAST services Downloading genome sequences and next-gen reads from the NCBI FTP and Aspera sites.


SciFinder Essentials for Chemists and Non-Chemists (register)
May 6 (Wed),
Geisel Lib Bldg, Classroom 1
10:00 – 11:30 am

SciFinder is one of the core information resources for exploring the chemical literature, but it’s not just for chemists. It can also be helpful to researchers in engineering, environmental sciences, physics, and radiology and other health sciences.

This hands-on workshop will cover the SciFinder essentials: topic and author searching, improving your search results, accessing the full text articles, and how SciFinder compares with other databases like Web of Science. You’ll also learn to search CAS Registry to find chemical substance information, and get an introduction to the built-in editor for drawing chemical structures and reactions.

Patents & Patent Searching (register)
May 13 (Wed),
Geisel Lib Bldg, Classroom 1
1:00 – 2:30 pm

Patents are critically important in protecting intellectual property and companies are investing fortunes in them to safeguard their inventions. It is estimated that between 2010 and 2012 in the smartphone industry alone, over $20 billion was spent on patent purchases and litigation. Without the protection afforded by patent coverage, technological innovation would dry up.

In this class, you will learn how patents protect your intellectual property and what rights they confer, what to expect in the patent application process, how to read and interpret patent documents, and why international patents matter. Learn how you can work with the UCSD Technology Transfer Office to manage and protect your inventions. Finally, learn about free web search engines you can use to discover if your invention has already been patented. Even if you don’t have an invention on the drawing board, this class will give you valuable insight into how patents work.

PubMed Essentials (register)
May 14 (Thurs),
Biomed Lib Bldg, Classroom 3
11:00 – 12:30 pm

This hands-on workshop focuses on what every user needs to know about PubMed, whether doing a search for a specific author or topic using keywords. Learn to focus your results with limits, become familiar with the features of the advanced search screen, and know how to use UC E-Links to easily get to full text articles.

PubMed: Beyond the Essentials (register)
May 28 (Thurs),
Biomed Lib Bldg, Classroom 3
11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Move beyond the basics to refine and expand your searching skills. Learn about MeSH terms and how to use them in a search. Use MyNCBI and its numerous tools to keep you updated and to customize PubMed for your most frequent types of searches. Great for the frequent searcher.

Carillon Chimes atop Geisel Library Make Telematic Debut at La Jolla Symphony Concerts

moon

 

On Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, the La Jolla Symphony & Chorus will premiere The Moon in La Jolla, the 2015 winner of the prestigious Nee Commission Award. In addition to the classic orchestral ensemble, the UC San Diego Library’s carillon, which sits atop Geisel Library, will make its debut in the La Jolla Symphony performances via telematic technology.

This “tele-concerto” incorporates technology that allows musicians to play music together from different sites via the Internet. Thus, for the first time in the carillon’s 26-year history, the orchestra in Mandeville Auditorium will play in real-time with a carillon soloist from atop Geisel Library at the May 2 and 3 concerts.

Truly a 21st century work, the innovative musical piece was composed by UC San Diego Ph.D. candidate and Hong Kong composer, Yeung-ping Chen, and is based on a poem written by Hong Kong poet and UC San Diego alumnus, Leung Ping-Kwan, also known by the pen name Yasi. Ping-Kwan crafted the poem, The Moon in La Jolla, when he was studying at UC San Diego in the late 1970s.

Yeung-ping Chen, an award-winning composer, has been the recipient of numerous prizes and grants, including the prestigious Altius Fellowship from the Asian Cultural Council. Chen, who is currently studying with UC San Diego Music Professor Lei Liang, is conducting research on telematics musical composition, performative strategies for electro-acoustic music, and a hyper-transcriptional compositional process which he calls “Sonic Engraving.”

The carillon in Geisel Library, is operated by musician Scott Paulson, a UC San Diego alumnus and Library employee. Paulson, who performs noon concerts and musical requests on the carillon, has been collaborating for many months with Chen, Library staff, and La Jolla Symphony musicians to bring the “tele-concerto” to fruition.

For more information about the concerts, or to purchase tickets, visit lajollasymphony.com.

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