UC San Diego Library’s ‘Food for Fine$’ Program Waives Overdue Fees for a Good Cause

The UC San Diego Library is teaming up with the UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry to offer students a unique alternative to paying recall or reserve library fines with nonperishable food donations.

In support of the food pantry, the Library’s Food for Fine$ is a new initiative encouraging students to offer food donations to receive a $2 credit per eligible item toward their existing fines for recent overdue Library materials.

“This initiative demonstrates the Library’s commitment to the UC San Diego community by providing needed relief to some students who might otherwise skip a meal to save money,” said Kymberly Goodson, program director for Spaces, Lending, & Access (SLA). “We’re thrilled about this partnership with the Food Pantry. It’s something we’ve never done at the Library, and we hope we can continue it in the future.”

To participate, students can drop off nonperishable foods at the Geisel or BLB Front Desks, including canned meats, canned vegetables, boxes of cereal, cooking oils, and much more (see details of eligible donations and fines here). No glass containers will be accepted and food cannot be repackaged, damaged, opened, or expired. Food for Fine$ kicks off May 27 and runs through June 9.

“Only fines incurred in Weeks 1 through 8 of Spring Quarter will be credited by donated goods, up to a $40 maximum,” said Goodson. “Alternately, participants can receive a credit for already paid fines from this time period.”

The UC San Diego Library joins a network of other universities with similar programs, such as UC Irvine Libraries, U-T at Arlington, and Texas A&M. Food for Fine$ originated in public libraries as a way to further contribute to their communities while also providing a way for library users to decrease or pay their fines and begin using their library cards again.

“We’ve seen an increase in students using the pantry as tuition costs rise. We currently serve over 700 students per week. A 2012 UC Undergraduate Experience Survey showed 25 percent of UC San Diego students ‘often’ skip meals to save cash,” said Sherlock Li, manager at the Triton Food Pantry. “With summer around the corner, Food for Fine$ is a great way for students to clear their cupboards before moving out and keep the Food Pantry stocked.”

The Triton Food Pantry was launched by Associated Students in February 2015 to ensure the academic success of students of all backgrounds. All registered students with a valid UC San Diego identification card can visit the pantry once per week to get up to 10 points worth of food. Fresh produce is also available to supplement students’ needs.”

For more information about the Food for Fine$ program, contact staff at either the Geisel or BLB Front Desks.

VPN? Need help with Off-Campus Access?

Off-campus access to licensed library resources is limited to UC San Diego faculty, staff and students, and is operated by UC San Diego’s Educational Technology Services. Visit library.ucsd.edu/spaces/computing/remote-access/ detailing the available methods and simple procedures for setting it up.VPN Conn

  • The preferred method is through the VPN AnyConnect (client) – used for your own personal computer. Go to the webpage above and download the VPN software for your operating system to gain full access to all of the library’s resources and databases, including journals and digital reserves.
  • From a public computer, use the VPN EasyConnect (web-based)method by going to vpn.ucsd.edu. This method limits your access to selected resources and databases.

For both of these sites, you’ll be required to enter your email/Active Directory (AD) username and password.

‘Master Storyteller’ Luis Alberto Urrea to be Keynote Speaker for 2018 Dinner in the Library

 

San Diego-raised novelist and UC San Diego alumnus, Luis Alberto Urrea ‘77, will be the featured speaker at this year’s Dinner in the Library on Friday, September 21, 2018 in Geisel Library.

Hailed by NPR as a “master storyteller with a rock and roll heart,” Urrea is a prolific author who draws inspiration for his novels from his binational upbringing and dual cultural experiences to explore greater themes of love, loss and triumph.

Urrea was born in Mexico, living the first part of his youth in Tijuana before moving to San Diego in the 1950s. Similar to other writers, he got his start in literature writing poems to impress girls in junior high. His early heroes were all rock stars, but not being musically inclined Urrea chose to follow in the steps of his literary role models. Even though Urrea’s UC San Diego journey began as a theater major, it was the Literature Department that ultimately led him to graduation day. Today, Urrea is most recognized as a border writer, though he says, “I am more interested in bridges, not borders.”

A 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction and member of the Latino Literature Hall of Fame, Urrea is the best-selling author of 17 books and has won numerous awards for his poetry, fiction and essays.  Read more…

Digital Collections Website Serves as One-Stop Resource for State’s History & More

Whether you’re a researcher, a teacher or simply a curious citizen, this one-stop digital platform offers unique cultural archival resources to California history lovers.

Developed and maintained by UC’s California Digital Library, Calisphere provides free access to over 1,025,000 digitized items including photographs, letters, artwork, diaries, oral histories, films, advertisements, musical recordings and documents. The oldest digitized item in Calisphere is an Armenian Manuscript Bible dating back to 1121 A.D.

Calisphere is now one of the largest collections of digital archival material in the state following a significant makeover in 2015—and continues to add new resources every week. These collections have been digitized and curated by all ten UC campuses and other notable libraries, archives and museums throughout California. Visitors can access selections from the collections from any device, at any time and no registration is required. The UC San Diego Library is a major contributor with over 90,000 digital objects in Calisphere. The website also serves as a hub, gathering content and contributing nationally to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)Read more…

Tech Lending Program

Forget your phone or laptop charger?  Need a camera for your class project?

Can’t find a video adapter to connect your laptop?

 

TLP side2TLP side3TLP side4

 

Stop by the Geisel Library Media Desk in 1st floor west to checkout our collection of cables, chargers, cameras, and other tech tools.

A full list of items is available on our website, or by searching “tech lending” in Roger.

Send questions, suggestions, and comments to LSPtech@ucsd.edu.

Weeklong Summer Training Program for Scholarly Communications Starts July 30

125 participants attended the 2017 FSCI at UC San Diego

 

Do you want to be part of a growing community that aims to transform and improve the future of research communication and e-Scholarship? Then join us for the second installment of the Force11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI) from July 30 to August 3, 2018 at the MET Building on the UC San Diego campus. The program, hosted by the UC San Diego Library, provides learning opportunities for both the expert and the novice in scholarly communication.

The five-day intensive summer training institute is designed to help researchers, students, administrators, librarians, post docs and others navigate the ever-changing and increasingly complex scholarly communications landscape. FSCI will incorporate intensive coursework, seminar participation, group activities, lectures, and hands-on training taught by worldwide leading experts in various aspects of scholarly communication. Participants will attend courses on a wide range of topics including author carpentry, bad publishing, reproducible code and data, software citation, public humanities and more.  Read more…

A New Model for Open Access: Radically Accessible and Transparent

Hear about advances in peer review and options for publishing!

May 15, 2018 at 1:00 pm

Geisel Library Dunst Classroom.

peer review illustration

Image Credit: Flickr User AJC1
Creative Commons License: BY-SA

A New Model for Open Access (OA): Radically Accessible and Transparent 

What exactly does the “access” mean in OA? Some university presses have begun to publish works open access, but this often means that either the authors or their institution have to come up with large subventions to make this possible. We will discuss the benefits of OA broadly but also platinum OA in particular, which is the version that is neither market dependent nor contingent upon subventions.

Along with its benefits, OA has many challenges, one of which is a reputation problem. Presses are dealing with this is through rigorous peer review. But when we say something is peer reviewed, what exactly do we mean? Scholarly publishers of all kinds (OA and traditional, commercial and non-profit) claim that their uniqueness pivots on the process of peer review; however, when we ask individual presses what form that process takes, the answers vary. In this talk, we will discuss the work that is being sponsored by Lever and MIT on a signaling system for peer review transparency. We will also discuss the unique challenge that DH projects pose in the peer review process.

Speaker Bio:

Beth Bouloukos acquires broadly in the humanities and social sciences for the open access and digitally native Amherst College and Lever Presses. She previously acquired books in education, Latin American/Latinx studies, and gender and sexuality studies at SUNY Press for seven years. Beth received her PhD from Cornell University where she researched Latin American literature, film, and culture through a feminist lens.  She has also served as a visiting assistant professor at Fairfield University and the University at Albany, SUNY.

UC San Diego Library Wraps Up Holocaust Living History Workshop Lecture Series May 30



Join us for the last installment of the 2017-2018 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) with Eva Clarke on Wednesday, May 30 from 5-7 p.m. in the Seuss Room. This event is free and open to the public.

Eva Clarke

What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Clarke was one of three “miracle babies” who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva’s chances of survival were extremely slim. Against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK and settled in Cardiff. Nowadays, Eva regularly talks to audiences, and her remarkable story has been featured in the British and American media. She and her mother are among the protagonists of Wendy Holden’s book “Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance, and Hope.”

Every year the popular HLHW invites high-caliber speakers to campus to share inspiring stories that broaden our understanding of the past, foster tolerance and preserve the memories of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. This year we heard from individuals such as international lawyer Philippe Sands and POLIN Museum’s curator Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.

If you missed the opportunity to attend a workshop, you can watch recordings of selected talks for research through the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections and UCTV.

New Popular Science Reading – May 2018

So many new popular science books.

You can find these and the rest of the collection on the main (2nd) floor in the Geisel Library Building West Wing, near the Research Assistance Desk and New Books shelf, arranged by call number for easier browsing.

Many of the books under the “On Order” tab already have links to records in Roger, so if there’s one on that list that catches your attention, you can place a Request on the book and be the first one to read it when it arrives.

book jackets

2018 Global Accessibility Awareness Fair

computer monitor, mouse, papers scattered on messy desk

Global Accessibility Awareness Fair
Thursday, May 17, 2018 • 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Hosted by: The Library Diversity & Inclusion Committee

 

Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) happens annually on the third Thursday in May. The purpose of GAAD is to get everyone talking, thinking and learning about digital access and inclusion. GAAD started in 2011 as a way for web developers to educate themselves and others about how to create web pages that are accessible to people with disabilities and has since become an international initiative with events around the globe. While people may be interested in the topic of making technology accessible and usable by persons with disabilities, the reality is that they often do not know how or where to start. Awareness comes first.

Join us for the Global Accessibility Fair where we will have different stations to learn more about digital accessibility, including:

  • Virtual Reality experiences to simulate audio and visual disabilities
  • Practice navigating webpages without a mouse
  • Computer demos of screenreaders and voice-recognition software
  • Informational tables

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

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