ARTstor and Condé Nast collaborating to share 25,000 images

ARTstor has reached an agreement with Condé Nast to share 25,000 images of cartoons from The New Yorker, highlights from the Condé Nast Archive of Photography, and selections from the Fairchild Photo Service.

The images in these collections will be of great assistance in teaching a myriad of subjects like history, literature, and fashion. The New Yorker’s cartoons are legendary for their incisive wit and for shedding light on the dominant topics of every era, from the Depression to the Internet. The magazine’s cartoonists include renowned figures like, Peter Arno, Roz Chast, Otto Soglow, William Steig, James Thurber, and Gahan Wilson. The Condé Nast Collection, containing images dating back to 1892, represents one of the world’s greatest collections of magazine photography, encompassing fashion, celebrity, and lifestyle photography from publications such as House & Garden, Glamour, Vanity Fair, and Vogue. The Fairchild Photo Service, comprised of more than three million photos gathered over six decades, is the fashion world’s preeminent image gallery. Read more…

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Andy Warhol’s San Diego Surf

In May 1968, Andy Warhol filmed San Diego Surf on the shores of La Jolla. It was only partially edited and never released—until now.

MCASD La Jolla will host the West Coast premier of the film on Saturday, March 16. Guests are invited to come early for a pre-screening happy hour beginning at 4:30 PM, which will include light snacks and a no-host bar as well as the opportunity to view archival footage of Warhol and Paul Morrissey making the film.

This never-before-seen footage was filmed by La Jollan Lee Pratt.

sdsurfSan Diego Surf was filmed on the shores of La Jolla in May 1968. Shot in color on 16mm with two cameras manned by Warhol and collaborator Paul Morrissey, the film features Factory superstars Viva, Taylor Mead, Louis Waldon, Joe Dallesandro, Tom Hompertz, Ingrid Superstar, Eric Emerson, Nawana Davis, and others. Its loose narrative concerns an unhappily married couple (Taylor Mead and Viva) that rent their beach house to a group of surfers.

 

 

After it was filmed, the work was only partially edited and never released. In 1995-96, The Andy Warhol Foundation commissioned Morrissey, under the supervision of Foundation curator Dara Meyers-Kingsley, to complete the editing based on existing notes and the rough cut. Andy Warhol produced more than 4,000 reels of film between 1963 and 1971, when the works were withdrawn from circulation. In the early 1980s a project began to preserve and re-release his films. One of the last films in which Warhol had direct involvement, San Diego Surf is being released by The Andy Warhol Museum.

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A Brief History of John Baldessari

Video narrated by Tom Waits!

Love it.

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Walters Museum uploads 19,000 photos to Wikimedia Commons

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, has donated more than 19,000 freely-licensed images of artworks to Wikimedia Commons. The Walters’ collection includes ancient art, medieval art and manuscripts, decorative objects, Asian art and Old Master and 19th-century paintings.

The images and their associated information will join our collection of more than 12 million freely usable media files, which serves as the repository for the 285 language editions of Wikipedia. ‬Check it out!!

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R.I.P. Mike Kelley

Via ArtInfo:

Artist Mike Kelley has passed away at his home in Los Angeles, having apparently taken his own life. The tragic news was confirmed to BLOUIN ARTINFO by Helene Winer, of New York’s Metro Pictures gallery, a long-time associate of the artist.

“It is totally shocking that someone would decide to do this, someone who has success and renown and options,” said Winer. “It’s extremely sad.” She added that the artist had been depressed.

Kelley was born in 1954 in a suburb of Detroit, Michigan. He became involved in the city’s music scene as a teen, and while a student at the University of Michigan, formed the influential proto-punk band Destroy All Monsters with fellow artists Jim Shaw, Niagara, and Cary Loren (a retrospective devoted to Destroy All Monsters was held at L.A.’s Prism gallery last year). Together, the band hatched a style of performance that skirted the edge of performance art.

After graduating college in 1976, he moved to Los Angeles to attend the California Institute of the Arts, studying alongside teachers like John Baldessari and Laurie Anderson. Music continued to be a constant passion: he formed another band, “Poetics,” with fellow CalArts students John Miller and Tony Oursler.

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The 10 Best iPhone and iPad Apps for Art Teachers 2010

Look here for a list of the best art apps for teachers!

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R.I.P. Eva Zeisel, groundbreaking designer

From the Washington Post Online

Eva Zeisel, who designed and produced stylish but simple lines of tableware that were credited with bringing a sense of serenity to American dinnertime, died Dec. 30 at her home in New City, N.Y.

Mrs. Zeisel was 105 and had come to America just before World War II, after a harrowing series of adventures in the turbulent Europe of the 1930s.

Her daughter, Jean Richards, confirmed the death but said she did not know the medical cause.

Mrs. Zeisel was widely regarded as a master of modern design. Her salt and pepper shakerscreamers and ladles are included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Yet she resisted being characterized as an artist. “Art has more ego to it than what I do,” she once told the New Yorker.

What Mrs. Zeisel did was create everyday objects that fundamentally changed the look of American kitchens and dining rooms.

She brought “a trained designer’s eye and touch to the kind of inexpensive daily goods that were available to everyone,” said Karen Kettering, vice president for Russian art at Sotheby’s and a former curator at the Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens in the District, which featured a retrospective of Mrs. Zeisel’s work in 2005.

Mrs. Zeisel received artistic training in her native Hungary in the years after World War I. She moved to the Soviet Union, where she worked in a factory and, after building a reputation as a talented ceramicist, landed a job as art director of the state-run porcelain and glass industries.

While in that position, Mrs. Zeisel was falsely accused of conspiring to assassinate Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. Read more…

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R.I.P. Leonora Carrington

Leonora Carrington, a British-born Surrealist and onetime romantic partner of Max Ernst whose paintings depicted women and half-human beasts floating in a dreamscape of images drawn from myth, folklore, religious ritual and the occult, died on Wednesday in Mexico City, where she lived. She was 94.

“The Inn of the Dawn Horse (Self-Portrait),” oil on canvas, 1939, Ms. Carrington’s first major Surrealist work. The painting is now in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A sculpture from a recent exhibition of Leonora Carrigton’s work at the Estación Indianilla Cultural Center in Mexico City.

The cause was pneumonia, Wendi Norris, the co-owner of Frey Norris Contemporary and Modern gallery in San Francisco, said.

Ms. Carrington, one of the last living links to the world of André Breton, Man Ray and Miró, was an art student when she encountered Ernst’s work for the first time at the International Surrealism Exhibition in London in 1936. A year later she met him at a party.

The two fell in love and ran off to Paris, where Ernst, more than 25 years her senior, left his wife and introduced Ms. Carrington to the Surrealist circle. “From Max I had my education,” she told The Guardian of London in 2007. “I learned about art and literature. He taught me everything.”

She became acquainted with the likes of Picasso, Dalí and Tanguy. With her striking looks and adventurous spirit, she seemed like the ideal muse, but the role did not suit. Miró once handed her a few coins and told her to run out and buy him a pack of cigarettes. “I gave it back and said if he wanted cigarettes, he could bloody well get them himself,” she told The Guardian. “I wasn’t daunted by any of them.”

Read more…

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Hidden Art in Woody Woodpecker

Via BoingBoing and NYT Online

Did animation pioneer Shamus Culhane secretly slip his own abstract paintings into 1940s Woody Woodpecker cartoons? Apparently so, according to cartoon historian Tom Klein writing in the new issue of Animation: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Watch the Video HERE and see for yourself!

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SILENT ZONE: ETHICAL INTRUSIONS IN AESTHETIC BEHAVIOR

Exhibit runs April 15-June 8, 2011 – With a Panel Discussion and Opening Reception (5 pm) in the  Calit2 Auditorium, 6pm Friday, April 15, 2011.

Curated by Karla Villegas Featuring artwork byJosé Antonio, Vega Macotela, Laura Balboa, Laboratorio 060

The gallery@calit2 is pleased to announce “Silent Zone: Ethical Intrusions in Aesthetic Behavior,” which will be on exhibit April 5-June 8, 2011. Curated by Karla Villegas, it features the work of José Antonio Vega Macotela, Laura Balboa, and Laboratorio 060. The exhibition includes “Time Divisa,” a ceramic tile relief installation that replicates the main wall of the Santa Martha Acatitla prison in Mexico City,  and “The wind blows where it wants to” a series of dialogues with inmates of the prison, by José Antonio Vega Macotela. Laura Balboa’s installation “.tv,” refers to the internet country code top-level domain for the islands of Tuvalu, and uses projection and LCD displays to visualize the islands, a country in danger of disappearing due to ecological decay and global warming. Laboratorio 060 presents “Frontera,” an interactive display of sounds and narratives based upon situations along the border between Tijuana and San Diego.

Read more…

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