Annual Turkey Calling Show

Free!

Join us on Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 12:00 noon Seuss Room, Geisel Library, UC San Diego

WithTurkeysSepia

UC San Diego Library’s  annual Turkey Calling Show takes place at Geisel Library at noon on the day before Thanksgiving and is presented in the style of an old-time live radio broadcast.

In this fast-paced show: get instruction on how to use turkey calls and find out how the American turkey became popular in European art.

Special note: with all due respect to the East Coast turkey, visit us at this show and find out why the West Coast turkey rules!

Hosted by sound effects expert Scott Paulson and featuring the Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra. Special guests, all coming from various corners of Geisel Library and UC San Diego, include Aislinn Sotelo as “radio ballet teacher” and Melanie Peters as “story lady.” Featuring actors Ellen Lawson & Glenn Motil and musicians Christian Hertzog & Kirk Wang.

Host and bandleader Scott Paulson, a UC San Diego alumnus, has an unusual apocryphal pedigree: he has been described by San Diego’s U-T as: “the love child of Garrison Keillor and Vincent Price.” He has also been called by that same paper:  “an avant-garde vaudevillian–think Samuel Beckett meets John Cage.” The Los Angeles Times described his activities as follows: “Paulson’s brand of G-rated fun, a sort of modern day morphing of Captain Kangaroo and Spike Jones, is always lively and at times wonderfully chaotic.”

Info: spaulson@ucsd.edu      or   (858) 822-5758

or visit  http://libraries.ucsd.edu

More info: http://scottsounds.com

 

Categories: Uncategorized Comments: 0

The silent films of La Jolla Cinema League, screened with live music!

Saturday, May 25th at 3:00 p.m.  Seuss Room, Geisel Library, UCSD. FREE!

The La Jolla Cinema League, a silent film club active in the 1920′s, was an amateur group with professional standards. League members wrote their own screenplays and produced, directed, shot, developed and edited films with their own equipment.

Familiar landscapes and landmarks in these movies will surprise you: a handsome early campus of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, elegant newly-built Irving Gill architecture, ocean vistas –and acting from local residents of the day!
Kiss

A small exhibit about La Jolla Cinema League is on display on the lower level, West wing of UC San Diego’s Geisel Library through June 15th.

(Here is a link to a digitized version of a 1929 issue of the official magazine of THE AMATEUR CINEMA LEAGUE….which shows the kind of guidance that club provided to its members)

A free screening of the films of LJCL with live music from UC San Diego alumnus Scott Paulson and his silent film band takes place Saturday, May 25th at 3:00 p.m. in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library.

La Jolla Light Article on event and exhibit.

http://libraries.ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758 or spaulson@ucsd.edu

 

12th Annual Toy Piano Festival!

A family friendly free show! Come early, or else you’ll end up sitting on the floor (the toy piano performers have to sit on the floor, though, so you’ll be in good company!) Hope to see you at 12:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 5, 2012 for the Twelfth Annual Toy Piano Festival!

Serious music for toy piano?
The first composer to write a “serious” piece for toy piano was American composer John Cage. His Suite for Toy Piano, written in 1948, uses nine consecutive white notes of a piano keyboard. This is significant because some toy pianos only have white notes (the black notes are sometimes merely painted on as a reference point so that players will know where “C” and all the other notes are.) Composer George Crumb used toy piano to great effect in his chamber music piece Ancient Voices of Children (1970). The score of this piece even shows a diagram of where to place the toy piano on stage.

Here in San Diego, toy pianos are celebrated with great fanfare in the month of September (because John Cage’s birthday is September 5!!) at UC San D’iego’s Geisel Library. It is there that Scott Paulson and his colleagues at the UCSD Arts Library host an annual toy piano festival. Composers visit the Library and pick a specific toy piano from the collection, and a piece is written specially for that instrument. Some toy pianos only have nine notes, some three octaves—so each piece has its own special charm and special limitations.

The Toy Piano Collection at Geisel Library consists of actual instruments, recordings, extant literature and commissioned scores. In 2001, because of the Toy Piano Collection’s activities, the Library of Congress issued a special call number and subject heading for Toy Piano Scores: M 175 T69

UCSD has a history with toy pianos that pre-dates the annual toy piano festival. Composer Robert Erickson, a founder of UCSD’s Music Department wrote a piece for toy pianos and bells that was premiered on California’s PBS television stations in 1966, just months before Erickson’s arrival at UCSD.

Featured: new works from local composers, a work from John Cage and songs from The Cat in the Hat Songbook.

Performers and composers this year include: Sue Palmer (the Queen of Boogie Woogie!) Ryoko Amadee Goguen, Christian Hertzog, Kenneth Herman, Gail Gipson, Ellen Lawson, Dana Mambourg Zimbric & of course, Scott Paulson!

A Brief History of John Baldessari

Video narrated by Tom Waits!

Love it.

Categories: All!, just art, Uncategorized Comments: 0

Walters Museum uploads 19,000 photos to Wikimedia Commons

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, has donated more than 19,000 freely-licensed images of artworks to Wikimedia Commons. The Walters’ collection includes ancient art, medieval art and manuscripts, decorative objects, Asian art and Old Master and 19th-century paintings.

The images and their associated information will join our collection of more than 12 million freely usable media files, which serves as the repository for the 285 language editions of Wikipedia. ‬Check it out!!

Categories: All!, Database News, just art, Uncategorized Comments: 0

R.I.P. Don Cornelius

Sad news. (via NPR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: All!, Music, Uncategorized Comments: 0

Alan Lomax ‘Global Jukebox’ Goes Digital

One of the greatest ethnomusicologists ever is getting a wider audience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the NYT Online:

A decade after his death technology has finally caught up to Lomax’s imagination. Just as he dreamed, his vast archive — some 5,000 hours of sound recordings, 400,000 feet of film, 3,000 videotapes, 5,000 photographs and piles of manuscripts, much of it tucked away in forgotten or inaccessible corners — is being digitized so that the collection can be accessed online. About 17,000 music tracks will be available for free streaming by the end of February, and later some of that music may be for sale as CDs or digital downloads.

On Tuesday, to commemorate what would have been Lomax’s 97th birthday, the Global Jukebox label is releasing “The Alan Lomax Collection From the American Folklife Center,” a digital download sampler of 16 field recordings from different locales and stages of Lomax’s career.

MORE

Categories: Articles, Music, Streaming Resources, Uncategorized Comments: 0

National Kazoo Day!

You missed it! (That’s okay, I did too.) But the Arts Library didn’t!

From the Huffington Post Online:

Jan. 28 is celebrated as National Kazoo Day,a day when, according to organizers, Americans are supposed to take time to recognize the kazoo, that musical instrument that takes only a minute to master for a lifetime to annoy.

But while the kazoo can be irritating when played by a hyperactive 5-year-old, it is a legitimate musical instrument, according to Scott Paulson, who uses kazoos to help provide soundtracks at silent movie screenings.

“It can be annoying, but it can be a delightful instrument,” Paulson told HuffPost Weird News. “It’s known mostly as a child’s toy, but it has a history of being a ritual instrument in Africa.”

Paulson says those early kazoos were used in rituals where the natives would disguise their voices using an animal horn and the membrane from spider eggs.

“It’s basically a mask of the voice,” he said.

Legend has it that the modern kazoo was invented in 1850 by former slave Alabama Vest of Macon, Ga., who devised the plans and than had it built by clockmaker Thaddeus von Clegg, a German immigrant. It was introduced two years later at the 1852 Georgia State Fair, but the familiar sub shape wasn’t created until 1902.

Click here for more video and to read the entire article!!

R.I.P. Eva Zeisel, groundbreaking designer

From the Washington Post Online

Eva Zeisel, who designed and produced stylish but simple lines of tableware that were credited with bringing a sense of serenity to American dinnertime, died Dec. 30 at her home in New City, N.Y.

Mrs. Zeisel was 105 and had come to America just before World War II, after a harrowing series of adventures in the turbulent Europe of the 1930s.

Her daughter, Jean Richards, confirmed the death but said she did not know the medical cause.

Mrs. Zeisel was widely regarded as a master of modern design. Her salt and pepper shakerscreamers and ladles are included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Yet she resisted being characterized as an artist. “Art has more ego to it than what I do,” she once told the New Yorker.

What Mrs. Zeisel did was create everyday objects that fundamentally changed the look of American kitchens and dining rooms.

She brought “a trained designer’s eye and touch to the kind of inexpensive daily goods that were available to everyone,” said Karen Kettering, vice president for Russian art at Sotheby’s and a former curator at the Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens in the District, which featured a retrospective of Mrs. Zeisel’s work in 2005.

Mrs. Zeisel received artistic training in her native Hungary in the years after World War I. She moved to the Soviet Union, where she worked in a factory and, after building a reputation as a talented ceramicist, landed a job as art director of the state-run porcelain and glass industries.

While in that position, Mrs. Zeisel was falsely accused of conspiring to assassinate Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. Read more…

Categories: All!, Articles, just art, Uncategorized Comments: 0

Rhizome

Check out the online art resource dedicated to the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology through open platforms for exchange and collaboration at http://rhizome.org/. Rhizome, an affiliate of the New Museum (New York City) includes Artbase (online archive of new media art), Community (artists’ portfolios, etc.), and Programs (publications, exhibits).

The UCSD Libraries initiated a subscription to Rhizome, enabling UCSD students, faculty and staff using their UCSD email to register for full access to the powerful and interactive features of Rhizome.

Categories: All!, Database News, Uncategorized Comments: 0
Older Posts »

Archives