Lost Hitchcock Film, Found!

VIA The Film Archive
After a world-wide search, a large part of The White Shadow (1923), thought to be the earliest surviving feature by Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1990), the celebrated master of suspense has been found in New Zealand – just in time for the filmmaker’s 112th birthday.

A wild, atmospheric melodrama starring Betty Compson in a dual role as twin sisters, one angelic and the other “without a soul,” the lost film turned up among the cache of unidentified American nitrate prints safeguarded for the last 23 years by the New Zealand Film Archive. So far, only the first three reels of the six-reel feature have been found; no other copy is known to exist.
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Robert Sklar, Film Scholar, Is Dead at 74

From NYT online

Robert Sklar, a film scholar whose 1975 book “Movie-Made America” was one of the first histories to place Hollywood films in a social and political context, finding them a key to understanding how modern American values and beliefs have been shaped, died on Saturday in Barcelona. He was 74.

The cause was a brain injury sustained in a bicycle accident, his son Leonard said.

Mr. Sklar, who was a professor of cinema studies at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts for more than 30 years, came to film in the 1960s, when he was asked to serve as a faculty adviser to the Cinema Guild, the student film society at the University of Michigan, where he taught in the American culture program.

He found the proposal enticing. After publishing a cultural study of F. Scott Fitzgerald, he had begun focusing on Hollywood film as a lens for analyzing American society in the 1920s and 1930s.

When he could not find a satisfactory history of American film, he decided to fill the gap himself and wrote “Movie-Made America: A History of American Movies.” It immediately became a standard work on the subject and has never been out of print. In 1994 it was reissued in a revised and expanded version.

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R.I.P. Leonora Carrington

Leonora Carrington, a British-born Surrealist and onetime romantic partner of Max Ernst whose paintings depicted women and half-human beasts floating in a dreamscape of images drawn from myth, folklore, religious ritual and the occult, died on Wednesday in Mexico City, where she lived. She was 94.

“The Inn of the Dawn Horse (Self-Portrait),” oil on canvas, 1939, Ms. Carrington’s first major Surrealist work. The painting is now in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A sculpture from a recent exhibition of Leonora Carrigton’s work at the Estación Indianilla Cultural Center in Mexico City.

The cause was pneumonia, Wendi Norris, the co-owner of Frey Norris Contemporary and Modern gallery in San Francisco, said.

Ms. Carrington, one of the last living links to the world of André Breton, Man Ray and Miró, was an art student when she encountered Ernst’s work for the first time at the International Surrealism Exhibition in London in 1936. A year later she met him at a party.

The two fell in love and ran off to Paris, where Ernst, more than 25 years her senior, left his wife and introduced Ms. Carrington to the Surrealist circle. “From Max I had my education,” she told The Guardian of London in 2007. “I learned about art and literature. He taught me everything.”

She became acquainted with the likes of Picasso, Dalí and Tanguy. With her striking looks and adventurous spirit, she seemed like the ideal muse, but the role did not suit. Miró once handed her a few coins and told her to run out and buy him a pack of cigarettes. “I gave it back and said if he wanted cigarettes, he could bloody well get them himself,” she told The Guardian. “I wasn’t daunted by any of them.”

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Roger Reynold’s PING

The UCSD Libraries are pleased to collaborate with Professor Roger Reynolds and MFA student Ross Karre for sound and image restoration services for Reynold’s Ping. Some of these digitized materials will be used for a performance of Ping on Friday, May 27th, 2011, 8:00 pm, at the Conrad Prebys Music Center Recital Hall (free!) The performers are Rachel Beetz (flute), Paul Hembree (live electronics), Ross Karre (percussion and video), and Roger Reynolds (piano).  The concert will include a screening of “Ping Migration,” a documentary short by Ross Karre.

The Arts Library is also hosting a “Ping Migration” exhibit through June 10th,  presenting images and artifacts related to Ping’s creation and UCSD premiere in 1968, while using an audio/visual component to contrast them to the new performance technologies.

The Ping digitization project involves excerpts and creative materials such as compositional sketches and diagrams, as well as interviews with Reynolds and photographs from both the 1968 and 2011 UCSD performances.  These digitized images will be part of the Libraries’ collection and made available to the public online.

Cindy Sherman Pic is Most Expensive Art Photo Ever

 Art dealer Philippe Segalot purchased Cindy Sherman’s “Untitled #96″ (1981) for $3.89 million at a Christie’s auction last week..

 ”Cindy Sherman Print Sells For $3.9 Million At Auction, The Highest Ever For A Photograph

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Hidden Art in Woody Woodpecker

Via BoingBoing and NYT Online

Did animation pioneer Shamus Culhane secretly slip his own abstract paintings into 1940s Woody Woodpecker cartoons? Apparently so, according to cartoon historian Tom Klein writing in the new issue of Animation: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Watch the Video HERE and see for yourself!

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Souta de Moura has won the 2011 Pritzker Prize

From the LA Times online:

Nobody can say Eduardo Souta de Moura is in Alvaro Siza’s shadow any longer. Souta de Moura has won the 2011 Pritzker Prize.

The 58-year-old Portuguese architect, who worked in Siza’s office for several years as a young architect, is the winner of this year’s Pritzker Architecture Prize, the field’s most prestigious honor.

Souta de Moura has produced a varied body of public and private work but is probably best known for a stadium in Braga, Portugal, that was completed in 2004.

The Pritzer jury also singled out his House No. 2 in Bom Jesus, Portugal, for praise. Like Siza, who won the Pritzker in 1992, Souto de Moura works in Porto, Portugal’s second-largest city.

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SILENT ZONE: ETHICAL INTRUSIONS IN AESTHETIC BEHAVIOR

Exhibit runs April 15-June 8, 2011 – With a Panel Discussion and Opening Reception (5 pm) in the  Calit2 Auditorium, 6pm Friday, April 15, 2011.

Curated by Karla Villegas Featuring artwork byJosé Antonio, Vega Macotela, Laura Balboa, Laboratorio 060

The gallery@calit2 is pleased to announce “Silent Zone: Ethical Intrusions in Aesthetic Behavior,” which will be on exhibit April 5-June 8, 2011. Curated by Karla Villegas, it features the work of José Antonio Vega Macotela, Laura Balboa, and Laboratorio 060. The exhibition includes “Time Divisa,” a ceramic tile relief installation that replicates the main wall of the Santa Martha Acatitla prison in Mexico City,  and “The wind blows where it wants to” a series of dialogues with inmates of the prison, by José Antonio Vega Macotela. Laura Balboa’s installation “.tv,” refers to the internet country code top-level domain for the islands of Tuvalu, and uses projection and LCD displays to visualize the islands, a country in danger of disappearing due to ecological decay and global warming. Laboratorio 060 presents “Frontera,” an interactive display of sounds and narratives based upon situations along the border between Tijuana and San Diego.

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Have A Request?

During winter and spring quarters, in honor of UCSD’s 50th Anniversary, Scott Paulson, the University Carilloneur and outreach coordinator for the UCSD Arts Library, will take song requests and play requested tunes on the Geisel Library carillon at noontimes.  Members of the campus and surrounding communities should send their song requests to Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu!

Paulson, a UCSD alumnus (Warren, ’84) and a well known musician and entertainer, has long taken song requests for the carillon from members of the campus and local communities.  Requests have ranged from  The Ramones to Salt ‘N Pepa -  He’s also received requests to play theme songs from the “Twilight” movies on Robert Pattinson’s birthday and was once asked to “Rick Roll” the carillon to the strains of Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up.” For more on this, the carillon and Scott Paulson!

Archiving a Movement at SDSU. Tonight!

Today! Wednesday evening, October 20th Martín Gómez,  the City Librarian of the Los Angeles Public Library will speak on the topic: “Archiving a Movement.”  This event celebrates the inauguration of our first bilingual exhibit, Unidos Por la Causa: The Chicano Experience in San Diego and the work of the Chicana & Chicano Archives Project.

His presentation will take place at 7:00pm in room 430 of Love Library at SDSU.  There will be complimentary parking for this event on the first and second floors of Parking Structure 1 (PS1) located at the College Avenue and Alvarado intersection

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