UC San Diego Library Celebrates National Poetry Month

This April, the UC San Diego Library will celebrate National Poetry Month by providing a space for poets, both published and unpublished, to share and talk about their work.  This is our first year doing this, and we are pleased by the amount of response. We have some local poets, as well as poets from as far afield as Ontario, Canada. UC San Diego Library would like to thank this year’s participants, and all poets, for keeping the craft alive.

For a live event honoring National Poetry Month please join us in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library on April 2 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. for a mini-marathon reading sponsored by the Department of Literature, the New Writing Series, and the UC San Diego Library.

 

Amanda Chiado:

Amanda Chiado is a writer and educator from Hollister, California. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts in San Francisco. Her work has appeared in Best New Poets: 50 Poems from Emerging Writers, Fence, Dusie, Cranky, and Line4.

Myron Michael:

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Myron Michael is a publisher, recording artist, and writing teacher. His poetry appears in a number of journals including Nanomajority, Toad Suck Review, Harvard Review Online, Eleven Eleven, Cave Canem XII, Spillway, Days I Moved Through Ordinary Sounds (City Lights, 2009), and Fourteen Hills. His chapbook Scatter Plot won the 2010 Willow Books Integral Music Chapbook Prize, and he is co-author of Hang Man (Move Or Die, 2010). Born and raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan, he considers the San Francisco Bay Area his second home.

Rachel Winchester:

Rachel Winchester

Rachel Winchester is a poet and choreographer in the second year of her Master’s Program for Dance at University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon. In this video she talks about her early writing process, as well as reading some of her work

 

 Chris Vannoy:

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Chris Vannoy has been a staple of the San Diego, California writing and arts scene for the last twenty years. He has performed his work at a variety of venues: from gallery readings curated by Quincy Troupe, to Lollapalooza, to your average coffeehouse open mic.

 

 Heidi Andrea Restrepo Rhodes:

 Heidi RR

Heidi Andrea Restrepo Rhodes is a Queer Feminist Colombian Mestiza; writer, scholar, artist, and political activist. Her performances, creative writing, and photography have been seen or are forthcoming in places such as San Francisco’s SomArts, Galería de la Raza, the SICK Collective, Veils, Halos and Shackles: International Poetry on the Abuse and Oppression of Women, Brown and Proud Press, The Blue Lyra Review, The Progressive, Mobius: A Journal for Social Change, Yellow Medicine Review, From the Ground Up, and others. Her scholarship and advocacy are focused on human rights and social justice in Colombia and the United States. She currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

 

 Alex Bosworth:

Alex B.

Alex Bosworth is a satirist, internet comedian, and spoken-word performer from San Diego, California. His collection of stories Chip, Chip, Chaw was published in 2012 by Renegade Muses Press. In this performance excerpt he has a little bit of fun with Edward Lear’s The Owl and the Pussycat.

 

Andrew Maranzanor (A. Razor):

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Andrew Maranzanor (A. Razor) is a spoken word performer from Lost Angeles, California. He is editor/publisher for Punk Hostage Press, an independent press out of Hollywood. The following poem was read in San Francisco, California at “Poems Under the Dome,” a poetry performance inside San Francisco City Hall

 

Alexandra Naughton:

Alexandra Naughton is a poet living in Oakland, California. The following videos were created to promote her book I Will Always Be Your Whore (Love Songs for Billy Corgan) released in 2013 from Punk Hostage Press. She describes the project as “More than fan fiction, this is the creation of a new pop culture.”

Thumbnail                      Alexandra Naughton

 

The following two poet entries come to us from Wisconsin. Hippie Rick and Margaret Rozga took part in a demonstration in the Wisconsin capitol building where many of the protestors were arrested for participating in an act of civil disobedience involving ongoing singing, called The Solidarity Sing Along. Both poems were included in the anthology chapbook called Turn Up the Volume: Poems about the States of Wisconsin published in 2013. The proceeds were used for a legal defense fund for Solidarity Sing Along.

Hippie Rick performing the poem Sing On

Margaret Rozga performing the poem The State of Wisconsin

 

 Marissa Bell Toffoli:

Marissa Bell Toffoli

Marissa Bell Toffoli is an editor and creative writing teacher from Berkeley, California. She publishes interviews with writers online at Words With Writers. Marissa holds an MFA in Writing from California College of the Arts and is the poetry editor for Exterminating Angel Press: The Magazine. Her e-chapbook, Under the Jacaranda, is available from TheWriteDeal.

 

JC Olsthoorn:

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JC Olsthoorn is a poet and painter born and raised outside of Montreal, Quebec and now lives and works in Ottawa, Ontario. Writing poetry for close to forty years, John’s poems have been published in literary magazines and in a chapbook, ‘as hush as us’ (1980).

 

 D. Russel Micnhimer:

 OREGONPOEMTAKEONE

Our last poet is D. Russel Micnhimer reading his work THE BEAUTY OF OREGON: A HEROIC CROWN OF SONNETS. A heroic crown is a poetic form which is concerned with a single theme. Each of the sonnets explores one aspect of the theme, and is linked to the preceding and succeeding sonnets by repeating the final line of the preceding sonnet as its first line. The first line of the first sonnet is repeated as the final line of the final sonnet, thereby bringing the sequence to a close.

UC San Diego Library Receives Personal Papers of Jonas Salk

Media Contact:  Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667 or ddavies@ucsd.edu

The University of California, San Diego Library has become the official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk, noted physician, virologist, and humanitarian, best known for his development of the world’s first successful vaccine for the prevention of polio.              Salk1

The papers—which constitute almost 600 linear feet (or nearly 900 boxes)—were recently donated to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections by Salk’s sons, Peter, Darrell and Jonathan, all of whom, like their father, trained as physicians and are involved in medical and scientific activities.

Salk2While recognized world-wide for his significant contributions, Jonas Salk is particularly noted locally for his founding of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies adjacent to UC San Diego and the impact this had on the city’s metamorphosis into a major center for biomedical and scientific research and discovery. The Institute will celebrate the Jonas Salk Centenary in the fall of 2014 and, as part of this notable milestone, the Library will hold a major exhibition of the Salk Papers and collaborate with the Institute on other celebratory events.

“It is a great honor for the Library to be the official repository for Jonas Salk’s papers,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “The UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses the papers of some of the world’s most prominent and accomplished scientists, including Francis Crick, Stanley Miller, and Leo Szilard, as well as Nobel Laureates Harold Urey, Hannes Alfven, and Maria Goeppert Mayer. The papers of Jonas Salk are an excellent complement to these materials.”

The Salk papers constitute an exhaustive source of documentation on Salk’s professional and scientific activities. The papers cover the period from the mid-1940s to his death in 1995; best documented are activities largely related to the development of the Salk polio vaccine in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and the founding of the Salk Institute. The papers cover general correspondence, files relating to polio, his writings, photographs, artifacts—including two dictating machines—personal writings, and various research materials.   Salk4

The collection includes correspondence with a number of prominent scientists and others,  including Basil O’Connor and officers of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis/March of Dimes; immunologists Thomas Francis and Albert Sabin; physicist and biologist Leo Szilard; mathematician and philosopher Jacob Bronowski; architect Louis Kahn and other important figures in the worlds of art, science, education, public administration, and humanitarianism.

Salk came to La Jolla following a career in clinical medicine and virology research. After obtaining his M.D. degree at the New York University School of Medicine in 1939, he served as a staff physician at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He then joined his mentor, Dr. Thomas Francis, as a research fellow at the University of Michigan. There he worked to develop an influenza vaccine at the behest of the U.S. Army. In 1947, he was appointed director of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of  Pittsburgh School of Medicine, where he began to put together the techniques that would lead to his polio vaccine.

Salk3Salk’s research caught the attention of  O’Connor, then president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, and the organization decided to fund his efforts to develop a killed virus vaccine against the most frightening scourge of the time—paralytic poliomyelitis. Given the fear and anxiety that polio caused during the first half of the century, the vaccine’s success in 1955 made Salk an international hero, and he spent the late 1960s refining the vaccine and establishing the scientific principles behind it.

Salk chose San Diego as the site for what was to become the Salk Institute for Biological Studies after a year touring the country for the right location. In June, 1960, through a referendum, the citizens of San Diego overwhelmingly voted to make a gift of 27 pueblo lots in the La Jolla area, just west of the new University of California San Diego campus, for Salk’s dream. The Institute began operation in temporary quarters in 1963, and permanent buildings designed by architect Kahn were completed in 1967. The complex soon gained international fame for its extremely modern and austere design, which now enjoys a cult following among architecture and design buffs. Salk served as the Institute’s director until 1975.

 

Got data:? Announcing the Beta launch of openICPSR – ICPSR’s Public Access Data Collection

ICPSR recently announced that openICPSR has launched in its Beta form for use by member institutions. The service is found at: www.openicpsr.org

openICPSR is a research data-sharing service for the social and behavioral sciences. Because depositors pay to deposit research data and documentation, the service allows the public to access research data at no charge. openICPSR assists researchers in meeting requirements for public access to federally funded research data. It ensures that data depositors fulfill public-access requirements of grant and contract RFPs.

openICPSR will run in beta form through June 2014. During the beta period, researchers at member institutions are welcome to self-deposit data and documentation free of charge. Beginning in July 2014, the service will open to the public and the fee for self-deposits will be $600 US per project.

Please contact Annelise Sklar for the members-only promotion code.

Please note that professional curation deposits are not included in the openICPSR free offer. Researchers desiring professional curation with public access should contact ICPSR for a quote at deposit@icpsr.umich.edu or 734-647-2200.

openICPSR will continue to add functionality over the course of the next several months; however, self-deposits, when published, will indeed be available to the public, assigned a DOI, and cataloged. (One exception is the deposit of restricted-use data. These data will be accepted, assigned a DOI, and cataloged; however, restricted-use data will not be distributed until later in the year and then via our virtual data enclave (VDE) with a nominal charge to the data requester.)

Downloading PDFs from HathiTrust

The HathiTrust Digital Library contains over 4.7 million titles, many of which are full text viewable and downloadable volumes. For UC-affiliated users who login, 3.6 million fully viewable books and journal volumes published pre-1923, as well as later public domain books, are available. Some volumes in the HathiTrust Digital Library are only available to search, but are not available as full text or for download.

To download PDFs from HathiTrust:

  1. Go to www.hathitrust.org.
  2. Click Login in the upper right. Select University of California, San Diego and click Continue.
  3. Choose Active Directory, then enter your username and password. You will be redirected to HathiTrust.
  4. Search the collection, with the Full text only box checked.
  5. Select the full view link next to the item in the search results.
  6. From the record view, select Download whole book (PDF) from the left column.
    1. If you did not login earlier, you will be prompted to do so at this point.
  7. Once your PDF is built, you can download it.
    1. At this time, you can only download the entire book or journal volume, rather than a single chapter or article. However, you can use Adobe Acrobat Pro or another PDF editor to delete the pages you don’t want.

Win a VIP Study Room during Finals Week!

VIPStudyRoomWin exclusive, 24/7 “VIP” access to a study room in the Geisel East Learning Commons (Room 2) on Monday March 17th 10am – March 18th 10am.

The study room will be all yours for 24 hours, stocked with  finals-themed goodies, and even a velvet rope!

To be entered to win, tell us what you like most about the Library in the comments below, or on any of our social media accounts, before Midnight March 13, 2014. It’s that easy.

One random winner will be drawn on Friday, March 14th from all entries. Good Luck!

UPDATE: Congratulations to Andres Nevarez from Sixth College, our VIP winner, and thanks to all who entered! Good Luck on finals, Tritons!

Make Your Next RSC Article Open Access (free)

This year the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) is continuing their Gold for Gold program. It offers researchers at participating campuses the opportunity to make their RSC articles gold open access (Gold OA)–free of charge.

  • The article (HTML and PDF) will be available on the RSC website, free to any interested reader. No paywalls, no required affiliation with a university or company that has a subscription or license to the journal.
  • The fees that RSC normally requires to make the articles Gold OA will be waived.

The Library will receive a limited number of vouchers, which the authors will “redeem” to waive the fee. To receive a voucher:

  • At least one author must be from UCSD. Faculty, student, post-doc, etc.
  • The article must be accepted (not just submitted) or very recently published, like last 2-3 months.

Please contact Teri Vogel if you have an accepted or recently published article and want to make it Gold OA.

These were the 9 UCSD publications made Gold OA in 2013, from researchers in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Department of NanoEngineering, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering Program, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography. (titles and links below the fold)

Read more…

How Do You Study?

When in the Library, do you study with a group? If so, we have wonderful study rooms available for your use. Just select the room that will best meet the needs of your group from http://libraries.ucsd.edu/services/places-to-study/ then reserve the room online at http://libraries.ucsd.edu/services/places-to-study/reserve/index.html

 

Cambridge Structural Database 2014

The 2014 Cambridge Structural Database System (CSDS) is now available for download and installation. Access is limited to UCSD faculty, students and staff.

  • Uninstall the 2013 version first.
  • The suite includes ConQuest 1.16, Mercury CSD 3.3, PC Vista, PreQuest, Mogul 1.6, IsoStar 2.2.1 PC Client and all database files. You can (depending on your operating system) also download optional programs, including DASH.
  • Download times will vary, as these are very large files. The ISO installation will require a DVD.
  • You will need the site and registration codes the first time you run CSDS on your computer. These codes are available on that download page.
  • There is also a “lighter” web version available, WebCSD.
  • Documentation
  • Important information for OSX users:

If you have any problems downloading or installing CSDS, please contact Teri Vogel about alternative installation options.

Scopus Workshop, 3/12

Please join us for a workshop to learn how Scopus, a citation/abstract database of 50+ million records, with additional tools to track, analyze and visualize research. It’s strongest journal coverage is in science and engineering, but it also indexes social science, arts, and humanities journals.

Wednesday, March 12, 1-2pm, Geisel Library, Room 274
Registration link here, and seating is limited
Faculty, students, staff welcome

At the workshop you’ll learn how to use Scopus to:

  • Find the latest research in your field
  • Find other researchers doing work like yours
  • Find the best journal to submit your work
  • Find out who is citing your work

This workshop will also cover how to use Scopus to track, analyze and visualize research, how Scopus uses ORCID to solve the name ambiguity problem in research and scholarly communications, and how to use Mendeley as a reference manager to make the process of writing papers more efficient.

The UC Libraries have trial access to Scopus for 2014. Your feedback is essential in helping us determine if we can and should continue access beyond this year. We encourage you to try Scopus and send us your feedback.

Access Medicine working again March 5th

Online access for UCSD has been restored by McGraw Hill to the licensed e-books and e-journals in Access Medicine. Full-text access had been blocked since Monday March 3rd. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience while this was unavailable.

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