Top International Lawyer Philippe Sands to Discuss Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity on Feb. 28

Philippe Sands, Photo Credit: John Reynolds

The creation of the International Criminal Court in 1998 was a turning point in human rights law. Over the last two decades, the court has made significant progress—despite its many challenges—in putting international justice on the map. It has made great strides in fighting war crimes and crimes against humanity by holding the perpetrators accountable. Renowned international lawyer Philippe Sands has been dedicated to human rights issues throughout his career and has worked on high-profile human rights cases involving abuse and torture. Now, in his award-winning book East West Street, Sands explores the creation and development of legal concepts that came about as a result of Hitler’s Third Reich which changes our understanding of history and how civilization has tried to cope with mass murder.

Sands, a professor of law and director of the Centre on International Courts and Tribunals at University College London, will be the featured speaker at the Wednesday, February 28 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW), a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program. The February 28 lecture—sponsored by Michelle and William Lerach—will take place at 7:00 p.m. in Hojel Auditorium at the Institute of the Americas on the UC San Diego campus. A book signing and dessert reception will follow the talk; copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event from Warwick’s. The event is free and open to the public. However, reservations must be made in advance; to reserve tickets visit, hlhw_sands_eventbrite.com.

Sands’ Nazi-era saga East West East Street is akin to a personal detective thriller that uncovers secret pasts, weaving his grandfather’s story with the lives and work of two historically important men: Hersch Lauterpacht and Raphael Lemkin. Sands examines the personal and intellectual evolution of Lauterpacht and Lemkin, who simultaneously originated the ideas of “genocide” and “crimes against humanity.” Lauterpacht and Lemkin, not knowing the other, studied at the same university, in the city of Lviv which was a major cultural center of Europe at the time.  Read more…

Cambridge Structural Database 2018 Now Available

The 2018 Cambridge Structural Database System (including ConQuest and Mercury) is now available to download from the UC distribution site at UCLA. The Cambridge Structural Database is the largest database of validated crystal structures, with 900,000+ entries for organic and organometallic compounds.

Downloading CSD:

  • You must be on the campus network or wifi, or using VPN to access the files on that page.
  • Don’t forget the site and confirmation codes, which you can get to by clicking San Diego (UCSD) link. You’ll need those codes during the CSDS installation.
  • CSDS is available for Windows, OSX, and Linux/Unix. It is recommended that you uninstall CSDS 2017 before you start this installation.
    • There’s an additional Windows application that can be downloaded separately. CrossMiner is a “novel tool that allows crystal structure databases such as the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to be searched in terms of pharmacophore queries.”
  • You can also search the CSD structures through WebCSD, without installing any software.

Read more…

New Popular Science Reading – February 2018

Here are some books we’ve just added to our Popular Science collection.

The books are shelved on the main (2nd) floor in the Geisel Library Building West Wing, near the Research Assistance Desk and New Books shelf, arranged by call number so you can browse by topic.

Many of the books under the “On Order” tab already have links to records in Roger, so if there’s one on that list that catches your attention, you can place a Request on the book and be the first one to read it when it arrives.

Book covers from new popular science books

Medical Illustrations Exhibit

  

Medical Illustrations Exhibit
January 16 – March 4, 2018
Biomedical Library Breezeway

The UC San Diego Library recently installed a Medical Illustrations exhibit featuring visual literary materials that record and relay medical and biological knowledge. The ongoing exhibit aims to explore the noteworthy craft of artists and writers that have contributed to our understanding of modern medicine.

Among the items on display include illustrations, books, and studies highlighting critical medical achievements. Featured works include a reproduction oil painting on canvas by Rembrandt, vibrant illustrations from Niki de Saint Phalle’s personal call to action in the earliest years of the public health crisis, and examples of Leonardo Da Vinci’s groundbreaking anatomical studies. Additional works include a Native American medicine hut drawn by a Cheyenne warrior and excerpts chronicling the advent of herbal medicine in the nineteenth century.

We are open to suggestions for additional works to showcase in the exhibit. Please send us your ideas via Twitter or Instagram DM @ucsdlibrary.

The exhibit will be up through the month of February in the Biomedical Library Building breezeway.

 

16th Annual Paper Theatre Festival: It’s the Smallest Show on Earth!

This Scale Model Educational Toy is Being Rediscovered and Celebrated at the UC San Diego Library

Festival Dates:
Saturday, February 10 • Noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday, February 11 • Noon to 5 p.m.
(impromptu performances throughout the day both Saturday and Sunday)

Monday, February 12 • 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
(special premiere performance from alumna Lily Huang at noon)
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

This three-day exhibit in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library features replicas of Victorian Era paper theatres as well as modern versions of the toy. Live performances are featured throughout each day.

In the Victorian Era, theatrical playhouses printed fine souvenir posters showing architectural elements of their theatre. Aspects of set design were shown on the posters along with representations of actual actors of the company (shown in costume from a specific production). Condensed scripts were included in these poster kits and paper doll players were soon seen in lively productions on a table top at home, with many aspects of theatre arts being introduced to producers and performers of all ages.

From these posters, families and hobbyists would cut out the proscenium, the curtain, etc., to create a scale model of that specific theatre. These paper theatre hobbyists ended up learning much about scenic design, lighting effects, sound effects, music, acting, directing, blocking—all through this paper theatre toy. Theatre-goers often bought these paper theatre posters as souvenirs promoting an actual production they saw. Those living far from the theatre district ordered paper theatres from a catalog and had them delivered to their small town as an educational toy for the household. A lot of cutting and pasting was involved but hours of educational fun and artistic exploration would follow. The many two-dimensional layers of a paper theatre add up to something with surprising depth and charm.

Exhibit and accompanying live events of this Paper Theatre Festival are free and open to the public. For more information Contact Scott Paulson via email at spaulson@ucsd.edu or by phone at (858) 822-5758.

For information about accessible parking on campus, click here.

Love and Breakup Letters to the Library

Letters to the Library
Deadline: Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018 at 6 p.m.

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, what better time to share your reasons for loving the UC San Diego Library, send us a love letter explaining your affectionate feelings … or let us know it’s time to break up by detailing your grievances.

Why write a letter to the Library?
Your letters will help us understand your needs and experiences, how you use the Library, and what you value about our offerings.

Guidelines

  • Letters are limited to no more than 150 words
  • Letters must pertain to library resources, spaces, services, or activities and may not include profanity
  • Multiple entries will be accepted
  • Authors may be identified or anonymous
  • Submission deadline is February 28 at 6 p.m.
  • Each (non-anonymous) submission will enter you into a drawing for an Audrey’s Café gift card

Yours truly,
The UC San Diego Library

 

Library Sponsors Hackathon for Virtual, Mixed, and Augmented Reality

HackXR
36-hour VR/ AR Hackathon
February 23-25, 2018
CSE Building, UCSD (EDU3)
Application Deadline: Friday, Feb. 16
Register: hackxr.io

The student-run Virtual Reality Club at the University of California San Diego is launching the university’s first-ever hackathon devoted exclusively to software programming for what they call ‘Extended Reality’ (XR) applications.

The 36-hour hackathon will run over three days from 7 p.m. on Friday, February 23 to 1 p.m. on Sunday, February 25. The event will take place in and around the VR Lab located in the basement of the Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) building on the UC San Diego campus. The cutoff for registration is February 16, 2018.

“Until now, most hackathons have focused on general software programming, while making room for some hackers who wanted to develop virtual-reality applications,” said HackXR director Anish Kannan, a senior majoring in Computer Science and officer of the VR Club. “We thought it was time to devote an entire hackathon to the growing ranks of students who are developing not only virtual worlds for virtual reality (VR), but also for other points on the spectrum of virtual environments including augmented reality and mixed reality.”

HackXR is open to students from any university (with ID), but organizers are planning to cap participation at 100 entrants because of a limit on the number of XR-related systems available to support all competitors. Available hardware, space, computers, and computer peripherals will include HTC Vives, Oculus Rifts, Microsoft Hololens, Windows Mixed Reality Headsets, Samsung Gear VRs, Google Daydreams and Google Cardboards (for viewing VR programs playing on a smartphone). Mentors will also be available to help participants get mixed-reality software including ARCore and ARKit working on students’ smartphones. Read more…

UC San Diego Library Launches “Showcase Your Bookface” Contest

Channel your literary creativity and artistic spirit into creating your best bookface! Bookface is the growing trend of matching your face or part of your body to a book cover to illustrate a melding of life and art. The top five entries will receive a $20 Audrey’s Café gift card!

We encourage those interested in participating to browse and explore book covers for inspiration at the UC San Diego Bookstore, local bookstores, public libraries. 

Contest Details

Timing: Monday, February 5 (12:01 a.m. PST) – Wednesday, March  14 (11:59 p.m. PST)

How to enter:

  • Find the perfect book cover to capture your #Bookface.
  • Follow our Instagram page @ucsdlibrary then upload your entry to your Instagram account with the hashtag #GeiselBookface in the caption.

Who can enter: Current UC San Diego students, faculty, staff, and alumni.  

For the official rules and guidelines, click here. Entries will be judged on originality, creativity, technical quality, and compliance with the contest rules.

Tips:

  • If the face on the book cover is the same size as your face, hold the book close; if smaller than your face, hold the book further away.
  • Get your friends involved (hold the book, take the picture, or have them pose with you).

Fantastic Fans of the African Diaspora

Fantastic Fans of the African Diaspora Exhibit
February 1-28, 2018
Geisel Lobby (near east wing)

An exhibit of Fantastic Fans of the African Diaspora is featured February 128 in Geisel Library on the UC San Diego campus for Black History Month.

Among the items on display in three flat cases near Geisel’s east wing (main floor) are hand-held paper fans from North America popular throughout the 1900’s. The fans were distributed throughout churches and at civic assembly meetings to keep cool and relay information. These fans were a particularly important advertising tool for the African-American community. Black-owned businesses could be advertised on one side of the fan and an inspirational message or uplifting graphic on the other.

Also on display, vintage  fans featuring iconic images and inspirational messages of the Civil Rights Movement, woven fans from the African continent, and souvenir fans from many nations relaying the African diaspora.

For more information about the exhibit contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu.

Materials Science & Engineering Database (new)

UC San Diego now has access to ProQuest’s Materials Science & Engineering Database. This is a single platform to search across multiple MSE databases, including Earthquake Engineering Abstracts and Engineered Materials Abstracts (both already licensed by UC San Diego),  METADEX, Corrosion Abstracts, Environmental Engineering Abstracts, and Ceramic Abstracts, plus full text coverage 2,000+ journals.

Featuring content from 1962 to present, the database supports materials science research, covering topics such as metals, polymers, ceramics, composites, and biomaterials and dealing with areas such as corrosion, biotechnology, recycling, sustainability, materials testing and selection, metallurgy, energy and fuels, and new technologies. To support engineering research, the database provides easy access to millions of bibliographic abstracts for deep coverage of engineering research, including civil, mechanical, environmental, earthquake, biomedical, and transportation. Sources go beyond scholarly journals to include grey literature like patents, conference proceedings, government reports, and more.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Events Calendar

<< Dec 2018 >>
SMTWTFS
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5