Feed Your Appetite at Dinner in the Library Sept. 12 with Julia Child Biographer

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Evening set in Geisel Library benefits the UC San Diego Library

The University of California, San Diego’s 11th annual Dinner in the Library will take place Friday, Sept. 12 in the Geisel Library building, with proceeds benefiting the UC San Diego Library’s collections and services, which support student and faculty research and teaching. The evening’s festivities will include dinner and cocktails, a silent auction, and a keynote talk from internationally recognized biographer Noël Riley Fitch on “Sharing Julia Child’s Appetite for Life.”

Fitch wrote the first authorized biography of Julia Child, entitled “Appetite for Life.” As part of the evening, Fitch will give attendees a revealing look at Child’s incredible life. A culinary icon, Child is credited with bringing French cuisine to the American public with her cooking shows and famous cookbook, “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.”Thanks to a generous gift from the American Institute of Wine & Food (AIWF), a national organization founded by Child and Robert Mondavi, the UC San Diego Library is home to the AIWF’s Culinary Collection, which includes more than 6,500 volumes and other food and wine-related materials dating back to the 17th century.

“The UC San Diego Library provides the foundation for the campus to advance knowledge and discoveries in everything from public policy and the arts, to healthcare and science,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “Private support for the UC San Diego Library provides essential resources to help meet the information needs of our researchers, physicians, artists, students and community members.”

The UC San Diego Library provides access to more than seven million digital and print volumes, journals and multimedia materials.The Library’s vast resources, collections, and services are accessed more than 87,500 times each day via the Library’s website.

“The UC San Diego Library ranks among the top 25 public academic libraries in the nation,” said Brian E.C. Schottlaender, UC San Diego’s Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “It is support from our dedicated donors, alumni, and friends, that helps ensure that the Library can continue to advance the university’s leading-edge research and world-class education.”

As part of the evening, Dorothy Gregor will be honored with the 2014 Geisel Citation for Library Philanthropy. Gregor has played an integral role in the growth and success of the UC San Diego Library. She served as university librarian from 1985 to 1992, and led the Library through a period of great change, overseeing the underground addition to the Geisel Library building. Since then, she has continued to provide valuable assistance, including establishing the Dorothy D. Gregor Endowment for general support of the Library’s distinguished collections.

“Dorothy’s thoughtful patronage serves as an inspiration to others who understand the importance of academic research libraries in the pursuit of transformational discovery and knowledge,” said Schottlaender.

Sponsors of the 2014 Dinner in the Library include: The Dr. Seuss Fund at The San Diego Foundation; Don and Maryann Lyle; John A. Berol; Karen B. Dow; James Forbes, Ph.D., and Julianne Larsen; UC San Diego Alumni; Joel and Nancy Dimsdale; Elsevier B.V.; The Evans Foundation; Union Bank; EBSCO Information Services; James M. Hall; Jeanne Jones and Don Breitenberg; Standish and Theresa Fleming; Anne S. Otterson and United Capital Management.

Tickets for Dinner in the Library are available for $225 per person or $1,800 per table. Cocktails and the silent auction begin at 5:30 p.m., with dinner and Fitch’s talk following at 7 p.m. For more information or to register for the dinner, please visit: library.ucsd.edu/about/dinner.

Steampunk Tea at The Library

Steampunk TeaSteampunk Tea! Join futurists, adventurers, and writers from from the Clarion Science Fiction Workshop at UCSD for a lively event, Sunday, June 29, 3-5:00pm in Geisel.

The tea—which is free and open to the public— will be a celebration of steampunk literature, which re-imagines the Victorian Era with a sci-fi aesthetic in a steam-powered world. Steampunk Tea, 2012

Gaslight Gathering leader, Anastasia Hunter, will present a unique look into the Steampunk movement, and guests will enjoy live Steampunk-themed chamber music, films, Victorian Era paper theatre models, magic lanterns and a real working time machine!

http://libraries.ucsd.edu/blogs/events/steampunk-tea/

Steampunk Tea, 2012

New Data Management Tool Available

The University of California and several partners have released an enhanced and much anticipated version of the Data Management Planning Tool (DMPTool), a free tool that helps researchers and their institutions create effective data DMPTool logomanagement plans required by the federal government.

“The DMPTool, whose development was led by the UC Curation Center (UC3) in Oakland, is a critical service to UC faculty and an essential component in the suite of data management tools provided to researchers by the UC San Diego Library, ” according to David Minor, Director of the Library’s Research Data Curation Program.

The DMPTool aids researchers with a critical component of research practice required by agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Under the 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy directive, this requirement will expand to nearly all federal agencies within the next year.“This innovative technology was created by a talented group of colleagues working together,” said Patricia Cruse, Director of the UC Curation Center (UC3). “This highlights the importance of collaboration in the success of complex projects such as this.”Read the UC press release in its entirety.

RDCPlogo UCSDTo learn more about using the DMPTool and the data management, curation and sharing services available to UCSD faculty and researchers,  visit UCSD’s Research Data Curation Program (RDCP) website or email the RCDP for assistance in getting started with data management.

UCSD Research Data Curation Web site

UCSD Research Data Curation Email

Four Students Win Library Research Prize

Congratulations to the 2014 Undergraduate Library Research Prize Winners!  ULRP2014Jessica Gross, Maarouf Saad, Jessica Knapp, Adam Simon (not shown)

Co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UCSD Alumni Association, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the annual prize includes cash awards of $1000 and $500 for first and second place. Awards are given in two categories, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities, and Physical and Life Sciences, to undergraduate students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and use of The Library’s resources in research undertaken at UCSD. We applaud this year’s winners for their intellectual prowess, and stellar critical thinking and research skills.

In the Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities category, first prize went to Jessica Knapp for her project, “The Effects of Mental Illness on the Javanese Family.” Second prize was awarded to Jessica Gross for her project, “Religious Women as Apothecaries and Practitioners in Early Modern France.”

First prize in the Life and Physical Sciences category went to Maarouf Saad for his project, “Alcohol-Dysregulated MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Cancer.” And, second prize was awarded to Adam Simon for his project, “Synthesis of a Novel 2-Deoxystreptamine Mimetic: Building Blocks for Aminoglycoside Analogs.”

To be considered for the Undergraduate Libraries Research Prize, students must be nominated by faculty members and must participate in either the annual UC San Diego Undergraduate Research Conference held in the spring, or in other university programs that foster and recognize student research and scholarship. The Undergraduate Research Conference is one of three major undergraduate scholarly meetings that the Academic Enrichment Programs coordinate each year that afford students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to present findings of research conducted under the guidance of UC San Diego faculty members.

 

 

Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered

ruthRuth Klüger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis’ “model ghetto.” Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Klüger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir Still Alive, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Klüger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write. At this event, she will be introduced by history professor Frank Biess.

Sponsored by Phyllis and Dan Epstein Co-sponsored by International House at UCSD

When: Wednesday May 14, 2014, 5 pmstill alive

Where: Great Hall at International House, UC San Diego

Who: free and open to the public – refreshments served 

Holocaust Living History Workshop Series Continues

UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW), co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the Judaic1389.5 Holocaust B Studies Program, will present two final lectures in its “Journeys, Memories, Echoes” series. The HLHW is an educational outreach program whose aim is to broaden understanding of the past, to foster tolerance, and to preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. Members of the campus community and the public have an opportunity to meet with survivors and scholars and to learn more about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest compendium of Holocaust video testimony.

On Wednesday, May 7th, Ian Hancock will talk about his ground-breaking research Porrajmos: The Romanis and the Holocaust. The Judeocide is by far the best studied aspect of the Nazi agenda of persecution and destruction, while other victims have received comparatively little popular and scholarly coverage. It is a little known fact, for example, that the Holocaust claimed anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million Romani lives. Hancock will address this tragedy the Romani and Sinti refer to as “the Devouring” (Porrajmos).

HLHW3_hancockbookHancock received his PhD from London University, and for the last four decades has taught English and linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also the director of the Romani Archives and Documentation Center. Through his scholarship and activism he has successfully drawn attention to the centuries-long discrimination of the Romani and has helped to reassess the Romani identity within the Western world. He has represented the Romani people at the United Nations, served as a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, and is currently a state commissioner on the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. Hancock’s published works include The Pariah Syndrome, We are the Romani People, and most recently, Danger! Educated Gypsy.

While the Porrajmos has generated relatively few written records, ever more Holocaust victims HLHW2_bookcontinue to come forward with their stories. On Wednesday, May 14th, Ruth Kluger will read from her best-selling book, Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered. Kluger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis’ “model ghetto.” Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Kluger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Kluger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write.

This lecture is made possible by through the generosity of Phyllis and Dan Epstein. The lecturer will be introduced by UC San Diego history professor Frank Bless.

Please note times and locations: Parrajmos: The Romanis and the Holocaust will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room on the UC San Diego campus. Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered will take place in The Great Hall. Both lectures are from 5 – 7 pm. Driving and parking directions are available on the HLHW website.

An integral part of the Holocaust Living History Workshop is the Visual History Archive. The UC San Diego Library is one of only three university libraries on the West Coast to have access to the Archive, which is administered by the Shoah Foundation Institute at the University of Southern California. In addition to the over 52,000 original testimonies from Holocaust witnesses and survivors, additional video testimonies with survivors of the Nanjing massacre have recently been added. The testimonies are in the original Mandarin with English subtitles. Students and members of the public can access the Archive from any computer on the UC San Diego campus.

For more information about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact program coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://library.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Porrajmos: The Romanies and the Holocaust

ian_hancockThe Holocaust claimed anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million Romani lives, a tragedy the Romani people and Sinti refer to as the Porrajmos, or “the Devouring.” Notwithstanding the scope of the catastrophe, the Romani genocide has all too often been minimized or ignored. A Romani-born British citizen, activist, and scholar, Hancock has been instrumental in raising awareness about this tragedy. For the past four decades, he has been a professor of English and linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is the director of the Romani Studies program and the Romani Archives and Documentation Center. He has represented the Romani people at the United Nations, served as a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, and is currently a state commissioner on the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. At this special event Hancock will be introduced by Yale Strom, an expert in Jewish and Roma culture during and after the Holocaust.

Co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Department of Ethnic Studies

When: Wednesday May 7 2014, 5 pm     Where: UCSD Geisel Library Seuss room    Who: free and open to the public – refreshments served

Digital Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive Acquired

A rich digital archive documenting the UFW Farmworkers’ Movement in Central California from 1962 to 1993 has been acquired by the University of California, San Diego Library. The archive, which was developed by LeRoy Chatfield, includes a wide variety of information on the activities, accomplishments, challenges, and work of Cesar Chavez and the farmworkers who participated in the farmworker movement.

“In a world that has become increasingly digital, it makes perfect sense for libraries to acquire born-digital archives, especially when excellent opportunities like this present themselves,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “Given the strengths of our collections in terms of California and Baja California history, the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive is an outstanding addition to our holdings. LeRoy Chatfield has done a tremendous amount of important work in building this expansive website, and now, as part of the Library’s collection, it will be preserved and made broadly accessible to future generations of scholars and students.”

The Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive, which can now be accessed on the Library’s website, comprises thousands of items documenting the United Farmworkers’ (UFW) history and related events, including a timeline of significant milestones, oral histories, and manuscripts, as well as essays, and poetry penned by volunteers. Also included are 13,000 photographs, videos—including a short video on the farmworker union (NFWA/UFW) historic march to Sacramento in 1966—and a variety of art and images of cultural artifacts such as stamps, posters, paintings, and illustrations.

From 1962 to 1993, Cesar Chavez, founding president of the UFW, dedicated himself to organizing a farmworker movement in Central California. Although Chavez is renowned as an historic labor leader, Chatfield, a longtime Christian Brother and humanitarian who worked with Chavez from 1963 to 1973, said his vision began with, but stretched beyond the workers in the fields.

“Cesar Chavez’s vision for the farmworker movement encompassed far more than organizing a union,” said Chatfield. “His status as a revered icon has less to do with his union activities than with the personal sacrifices, commitment to nonviolence, and deep religious conviction that marked his life of service to impoverished farmworkers. I’m very pleased that his story—and the many stories of those involved in the farmworker movement—will now be maintained as part of the UC San Diego Library’s collections.”

Chatfield first met Chavez in 1963, and the two became close friends, bonding over their mutual commitment to and compassion for the farmworkers who labored in the Delano, California fields, picking grapes and other produce. Chavez asked Chatfield to work for him when the Delano Grape Strike began in 1965, and he continued to serve under his leadership until 1973, when he relocated to Sacramento.

Although Chavez’s death in 1993 brought an end to the farmworker movement, it reunited Chatfield with dozens of former UFW colleagues and brought back “floods of fond memories,” he recalled, “regarding my association with Cesar Chavez and his movement.” In 1994, Chatfield published a “private memoir” recounting his experiences with Chavez,Cesar 1968, now part of the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive site. After he retired as executive director of Sacramento Loaves & Fishes in 2000, Chatfield became inspired to document the farmworker movement, after reading a New York Times article lamenting the fact that the history of much of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s had gone undocumented, with many stories lost to the dustbin of history.

“Thousands of people were actively involved in the Civil Rights Movement but barely a fraction of their stories were told,” said Chatfield. “Because so much time had passed, their stories would never be told and preserved for future generations. This fact made me realize that I too had been immersed in a similar movement, and I knew at least 50 others like myself who had been involved. I realized I was well positioned to document Cesar Chavez’s farmworker movement and began to feel obligated to do so.”

“The Farmworker Movement Documentation Project is a labor of love and commitment accomplished by one man—LeRoy Chatfield,” said Literature Professor Jorge Mariscal, director of UC San Diego’s Chicano/a~Latino/a Arts & Humanities program. “But like the farmworker movement itself, one man stands in for the hundreds of dedicated contributors whose words and images live on in the archive. This will be a major research and educational tool for generations to come. Brian Schottlaender and the UC San Diego Library deserve high praise for acquiring this one-of-a-kind treasure trove of California history.”

What started as the Farmworker Movement Documentation Project in book form, morphed into an online presence in 2004, when Chatfield was introduced to a young woman, Jennifer Szabo, who possessed the requisite web skills needed to organize and present all the materials Chatfield was collecting in a digital format.

“I had amassed a large amount of farmworker movement primary source documents and materials,” said Chatfield. “Moving this project to the Internet enabled us to include oral histories, videos, photographs, artwork, cartoons, and buttons—a veritable multimedia presentation of the farmworker movement, an historical documentation of a 31-year social movement and the largest website of its kind.”

Media Contact

Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667,ddavies@ucsd.edu

Unveiling of Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive

UC San Diego Press Release

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