New Writing Series Features Award-Winning Poets and Multi-Genre Novelists

UC San Diego’s New Writing Series is excited to announce their upcoming readings from Ari Banias, Vanessa Angélica Villareal, Ronaldo Wilson, and Kate Bernheimer. The events are free and open to the public. Hosted in partnership with the Department of Literature and the Division of Arts and Humanities.

Ari Banias — Wednesday, January 23 — Geisel Library, Seuss Room at 5 p.m.Ari Banias photo 2

Banias is the author of Anybody, which was named a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the PEN Center USA Literary Award. His poems have appeared in various journals, in Troubling The Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and as part of the MOTHA exhibition Transgender History in 99 Objects. He is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and Stanford University’s Wallace Stegner program. Banias works with small press books and teaches poetry in the Bay Area. His most recent chapbook, A Symmetry, was published by The Song Cave in 2018.

Vanessa Angélica Villareal — Wednesday, January 30 — Geisel Library, Seuss Room at 5 p.m. 

VAV-Blue.jpgVillareal was born in the Rio Grande Valley borderlands to formerly undocumented Mexican immigrants. She is the author of the collection Beast Meridian, winner of the John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry from the Texas Institute of Letters, and featured as a best-of book at The Los Angeles Times, NBC News, BOMB, Literary Hub, Bustle, and Entropy. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Rumpus, The Boston Review, The Academy of American Poets, BuzzFeed, Epiphany, PBS Newshour and elsewhere. She is a CantoMundo Fellow, and is currently pursuing her doctorate in English Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, where she is raising her son with the help of a loyal dog.  Read more…

The Spanish Civil War 1936-1939

In July 1936, officers of the Spanish military initiated an uprising against their own Republican government in Spanish-held Morocco, as other planned uprisings were held throughout mainland Spain. General Francisco Franco took charge of the military coup and Spain was soon embroiled in a civil war.

The Spanish Civil War 1936-1939 Exhibit
Geisel Library, 2nd Floor West
On view through February 17

As historian Matt Crawford has written:

“Beyond the implications of the civil war in terms of Spain’s own history, the war is viewed, retrospectively, as a prelude to the larger ideological conflicts between fascism, communism, and democracy that eventually consumed all of Europe in World War II. The Spanish Civil War is also remembered as a testing ground for new techniques and technologies of both 20th-century warfare — as immortalized in the bombing of Guernica — and 20th-century media as represented by the rise of war photography and photojournalism.”

Read more…

Yearlong Holocaust Lecture Series Offers Perspective on Gender, Humanity and Resistance

 

The 2018-2019 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) series continues this winter at the University of California San Diego with an author talk, film screening and lecture. In line with this year’s theme of “History, Memory & Meaning of the Holocaust,” each workshop features a Holocaust survivor, witness, or scholar who lends their experience and expertise to highlight memories of the Holocaust that are constantly being written, erased and rewritten. The series is presented by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program.

January 17 — When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust with Marion Kaplan

With support from Muir College and Sixth College

Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection “When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany” raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. The publication edited by Renate Bridenthal, Atina Grossman and Marion Kaplan explored women’s double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In her lecture, Kaplan takes the audience on a historical tour of her research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies. RSVP is required at https://hlhw-kaplan.eventbrite.com.

*This event is sold out but walk-ins will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis if seats become available.

February 6 — 49,172: The Rescue of Bulgaria’s Jews with Atanas Kolev

Sponsored by Daniel and Phyllis Epstein

The saving of the entire Jewish minority in Bulgaria is an extraordinary act of humanism and yet unbeknownst to many. In this documentary, a team of U.S.-based Bulgarian filmmakers embark on a journey to discover how the country was able to shield their Jewish community from deportation and execution. Drawing on private and public archives in the U.S., Israel and Bulgaria, the film depicts a mosaic of faces and stories woven together by the courage and resourcefulness of individuals in both powerful and powerless positions. The screening will be followed by a conversation with producer Atanas Kolev. RSVP is required at https://hlhw-kolev.eventbrite.comRead more…

Vladimir Vysotsky, a Russian Cultural Legend: A Talk by Dmitry Bykov

 

Dmitry Bykov

Vladimir Vysotsky: a Russian Cultural Legend
Thursday, January 24 • 5 – 7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
RSVP: bykov_talks_vysotsky.eventbrite.com
Accompanying exhibit on display in Geisel West, 2nd Floor through March 22

Vladimir Vysotsky. Photo Credit: Igor Palmin.

Vladimir Vysotsky (1938-1980) was a singer, songwriter, actor, and poet — a giant in Russian popular music and popular culture alike. Vysotsky was an icon of the 1960s and continues to unite the Russian-speaking diaspora.

In commemoration of what would have been Vysotsky’s 80th birthday, the UC San Diego Library is hosting an ongoing winter quarter exhibit on the late singer’s life and legacy. Included in the exhibit is a commemorative medal on loan from Riga, Latvia in appreciation of the university’s ongoing relationship with the Russian-speaking diaspora community.

Dmitry Bykov, Moscow-based scholar, novelist, and poet will discuss Vysotsky’s life, work, and legacy. The lecture and exhibit are jointly sponsored by the UC San Diego Library; the UC San Diego Institute of Arts and Humanities; Jewish Studies; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program; and the San Diego-based European Staff Association.

Dmitry Bykov is a celebrated Russian writer, poet, and journalist. He is a well-loved host of television and radio programs in Russia, and is the co-creator, with Mikhail Yefremov, of the popular Citizen Poet project, which presents contemporary Russian topics in the form of classic poetry. His fiction writing includes the novels, Justification (2001), Orthography (2003), How Putin Became President of the USA: New Russian Fairy Tales (2005), Living Souls (2006), X (2012), and The Block: A Walkthrough (2014). He has published biographies of Boris Pasternak, Maxim Gorky, and the singer-songwriter, Bulat Okudzhava, as well as several collections of essays and poetry. He lectures widely in Russia and abroad.

For more information about the event, please contact the event coordinator, Mariah Fellows.

When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust with Marion Kaplan

When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust
with Marion Kaplan
Thursday, January 17 • 5 – 7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Register: hlhw-kaplan.eventbrite.com

*This event is sold out but walk-ins will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis if seats become available.

The Holocaust Living History Workshop series continues with an insightful talk from Marion Kaplan on Thursday, January 17.

Marion Kaplan

Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. The publication, edited by Renate Bridenthal, Atina Grossman and Marion Kaplan, explored women’s “double jeopardy” as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Kaplan takes the audience on a historical tour of this research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies.

Kaplan is the Skirball Professor of Modern Jewish History at NYU and the three-time winner of the National Jewish Book Award for her books The Making of the Jewish Middle Class: Women, Family, and Identity in Imperial Germany (Oxford University Press, 1991); Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (Oxford University Press, 1998); and Gender and Jewish History, co-edited with Deborah Dash Moore (Indiana University Press, 2011).

Giving Back to Inspire: Nobel Laureate Harry Markowitz Places Nobel Prize in UC San Diego Library

Harry Markowitz’s Nobel Prize Medal.

 

Nobel laureate Harry Markowitz, an adjunct professor at the Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego, has placed his Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (Nobel Prize) in the UC San Diego Library. The medal and the accompanying diploma were gifted by Markowitz to the Rady School of Management in 2016 and placed in the Library’s Special Collections & Archives at an intimate ceremony at Geisel Library in early November.

Left to right: Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla; Rady School of Management Dean Robert Sullivan; Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Elizabeth H. Simmons; (center) Nobel Laureate Harry Markowitz.

Markowitz was awarded the prize in 1990 by the Swedish Academy for his pioneering work in the theory of financial economics. He was one of the first academics to identify the benefits of adding additional assets to a portfolio and introduced the idea of diversification. His work in understanding risk and how it applies to stock markets was seminal in the development of what became modern portfolio theory.

During the ceremony, Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla talked about UC San Diego’s powerful history in economics and praised the 91-year-old faculty member for his philosophic spirit and his motivation to seek the truth.

“We really appreciate what Harry has done for UC San Diego,” said Khosla. “His greatest gift is teaching us that it’s not about our own expertise. Our own expertise is an outcome of us seeking the truth in a certain field of study. This in itself has and continues to inspire our students to look deeper and not limit their innovation and exploration for truth.”  Read more…

Veterans Day – Library Hours and Resources

Library Hours for the 2018 Veterans Day Holiday are:
Geisel building
10 AM – 6 PM Sunday, November 11
10 AM – 12 Midnight Monday, November 12

Biomedical building
12 Noon – 12 Midnight Sunday, November 11
10 AM – 6 PM Monday, November 12

Resources about the 100th anniversary of the Armistice and end of the Great War:

  • Peace at Last: A Portrait of Armistice Day, 11 November 1918 by Guy Cuthbertson, Yale University Press, 2018. Available at JSTOR
  • Online exhibition at the National WW1 Museum and Memorial in Kansas City
  • Library of Congress current exhibition Echoes of the Great War; and online guide to WW1 materials

Workshop: Introducing Esri ArcGIS Hub

Workshop:  Introducing Esri ArcGIS Hub
Tuesday, November 13, 2018 from 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
UC San Diego – Geisel Library, Dunst Classroom (Classroom 1)

Transform how you engage and collaborate with your community using GIS. ArcGIS Hub provides a framework for a two-way engagement to content inside and ArcGIS Organization with the community through initiatives. This workshop will introduce ArcGIS Hub and Open Data framework that combine data, visualization, analytics and collaboration technology. Some familiarity with GIS will be useful for this workshop.

Instructor:  Canserina Kurnia, Esri, Solution Engineer

Registration: special login needed for workshop ucsdarcgishubworkshop.eventbrite.com

ArcGIS Hub is available to UC San Diego students, faculty, and staff through the University of California’s Esri ArcGIS license. More info on ArcGIS Hub, Initiatives, and Open Data.

For questions, please contact Amy Work, awork@ucsd.edu or Maryam Sarkhoush, maryam@ucsd.edu.

Life in Crazy Times: An American Internee in War-torn Europe with Lou de Beer

Life in Crazy Times: An American Internee in Warn-torn Europe with Lou de Beer
Thursday, November 8 • 5 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room 
Register for the event 

This event is sold out but walk-ins will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis if seats become available.

On Thursday, November 8, the HLHW series will feature Lodewyk “Lou” de Beer.

Lou de Beer

“I live in crazy times,” Anne Frank wrote in her attic on the Prinsengracht in Amsterdam. Lou might have echoed that sentiment, though his life was not in immediate danger. The son of American parents, Lou was born in Amsterdam. As a boy, he witnessed the arrival of the German troops in 1940 and lived through 18 months of occupation. When the US joined the war against Germany, the de Beers were declared enemy aliens and subjected to a lengthy odyssey through concentration and internment camps in Holland, France and Germany.

On the periphery of the war and the Holocaust, Lou caught glimpses of devastation and oppression without fully grasping their significance, though he would experience the hardship of war firsthand during his service in Korea in the 1950s. His experience adds an important and generally overlooked angle to the history of the Second World War in Europe.

For more information about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman at (858) 534-7661. To register for the event by phone, contact Ellysa Lim at (858) 534-1183. Please note: If you’re unable to reserve a seat before the event sells out, walk-ins will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis if seats become available.

Singing Our Way to Freedom Film Screening and Discussion

Courtesy: Espinosa Productions

Singing Our Way to Freedom Film Screening & Discussion
Wednesday, October 24 •  5:15-7:45 p.m.
Atkinson Hall Auditorium 
Register for the event

The Institute of Arts & Humanities (IAH) at UC San Diego invites you to a special documentary film screening and discussion. The film Singing Our Way to Freedom highlights the powerful story of Ramon “Chunky” Sanchez and the inspiring music of the Chicano Civil Rights Movement in San Diego. The screening is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Office of the Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion.

Singing Our Way to Freedom is a multilayered look at the life of Chicano musician, composer and community activist, Ramon “Chunky” Sanchez. Borrowing from musical traditions on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, Chunky uses music and humor as powerful weapons in fighting for social justice. From his humble beginnings as a farmworker in rural California to the dramatic moment when he received one of his nation’s highest musical honors at the Library of Congress, this character-driven narrative reminds us that the battle for freedom has to be fought anew by every generation.

Following the event will be a special panel featuring filmmaker Paul Espinosa, Ph.D. along with guests Estevan Azcona and Michelle Tellez, concluding with an audience Q&A session. The event is free and open to the public. Reserve a seat.

The UC San Diego Library is honored to be home to Espinosa’s archive. The rich materials document Espinosa’s more than 35 years of filmmaking, including interviews, photos, and correspondence, as well as films scripts, DVD’s, and video. The Library’s collections have particular strengths on California and Baja California history, as well as on Chicano culture and activism.

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