UC Libraries Become Hub for Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) DPLA 2brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world online. An online library into the United States’ historical and cultural heritage, DPLA aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more.

The UC Libraries have recently joined the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as a Content Hub. In our role as a DPLA Content Hub, the California Digital Library will be sharing metadata records from Calisphere, a website containing approximately 250,000 digital primary source objects contributed by libraries, archives, and museums across the state of California– including unique content from across the UC Libraries. Because of the increased exposure, the UC Libraries’ digital resources will have a broader, nationwide audience that will be able to find and discover unique collections maintained across the UC Libraries.

Browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, physical location via a map, a virtual bookshelf, and faceted search. You can also save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. Never has our cultural heritage been so easy to explore!

Sharing Julia Child’s Appetite for Life

Internationally recognized biographer Noel Riley Fitch offers some food for thought in “Sharing Julia Child’s Appetite for Life,” the title of her keynote address at the Library’s recent Dinner in the Library event now available for viewing on UCTV’s The Library Channel.

Fitch gives a revealing look into how Child’s passion for French cuisine made her a culinary icon to generations of Americans. Julia came of age in what Fitch jokingly called “The Golden Age of Food Processing,” when Julia, as a student at Smith College, would ravenously consume jelly-filled donuts, brownies with chocolate sauce, and other “tasty junk food.” At 6’3,” said Fitch, Julia was always hungry but was not all that interested in food per se. It would be many years before Julia became interested in French cuisine, laboring for a decade on her first book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, which launched her as a culinary icon.

Fitch’s book, Appetite for Life: The Biography of Julia Child, was the only biography exclusively authorized by Julia Child; her other subjects include fellow Paris expats Ernest Hemingway, Sylvia Beach and Anais Nin.

http://www.uctv.tv/shows/28563

UCTV Julia Child Fitch

 

Information Management Workshops in November

Upcoming workshops to help you manage your research:

Managing Citations
Nov 13 (Thurs), 12:00 – 1:30 pm, Geisel Lib Bldg Classroom 1
Register

This session will provide an introduction to a variety of tools for managing papers and citations including EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero, Mendeley and discuss how to choose the tool that’s right for you.

Refworks
Nov 19 (Wed), 2:00 – 3:30 pm, Biomed Lib Bldg Classroom 3
Register

Learn how to organize your references and instantly format your research papers, articles, and other publications using APA, NLM and hundreds of other writing styles. You’ll also learn how to download references using your favorite research databases and library catalogs. Collaborate with other authors via the RefShare tool.

EndNote
Dec 4 (Thurs), 12:00 – 1:30 pm, Geisel Lib Bldg Classroom 1
Register

Writing a research paper and need to manage your references? Using EndNote already, but want to learn about its “power” features (e.g., Connect, “Cite While You Write,” etc.)? Take this workshop to learn to build your own EndNote reference library and work with Word to write your paper and seamlessly create bibliographies. Note: We use examples from life sciences databases, but attendees from other departments are welcome.

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century

“That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century,” a new exhibit on display in UC San Diego’s Geisel Library, features a wide Ballots NewHampshire1884RepPresStCounty-190range of voting ballots or tickets that were used during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The ballots are the property of Samuel Kernell, a professor of Political Science at UC San Diego and co-author (with Erik J. Engstrom) of the new book “Party Ballots, Reform, and the Transformation of America’s Electoral System.” The book explores the fascinating and puzzling world of 19th and early 20th century American elections.

Ballots NewHampshireDem1882ExampleOfPaster-215According to Kernell, up until the late 1820′s, voting by voice was the prevalent practice for electing candidates for public office. A number of factors made it necessary to transition to a paper ballot system of voting, including the profusion of elective offices with too many voters voting for too many offices, both of which made voice voting impractical. The new practice of voters publicly submitting a party ballot, however, ushered in numerous possibilities for party patronage and outright voter fraud. With a single ballot — or ticket, as ballots were referred to then– affecting so many offices, party politicians sought to mobilize as many supporters as possible. And, since the voting was public, they could confirm that a voter voted “correctly,” which enabled party bosses to promise services, jobs, and even direct bribes–$5 gold pieces in the 1880 election–were offered up to persuade supporters to go to the polls. By 1880, some presidential elections were generating a nearly 80 percent turnout. It was not until the last decade of the 19th century, that Australian ballot reform swept the nation. This led to the private voting and state-supplied ballot listing of the various political parties’ candidates for each of the offices, which reflects our current voting process.

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century is on display through December 22nd on the main floor of Geisel Library.

Generation Open: The Value of Openness – Graduate Student Event, 10/24

oa

Are you an advocate for free access to publications, education materials, and data? Then you’re an advocate for Open Access!

The theme of Open Access Week this year (October 20–26) is “Generation Open.” The focus is on “highlighting the importance of students and early career researchers as advocates for change in the short-term, through institutional and governmental policy, and as the future of the Academy upon whom the ultimate success of the Open Access movement depends.”

That means you! Graduate students *are* the future of the Academy.  The extent to which you, and other early career researchers, support making research results freely accessible will affect not only your careers but the whole academic landscape.

Come join a discussion of Open Access on Friday, October 24th, 10-11 am in the Biomedical Library Events Room. Speakers will include Eric Bakovic, Linguistics Professor and Chair of the Committee on Library; Maryann Martone, Neurosciences Professor in Residence and Force 11 President; and Nancy Stimson, Scholarly Communications Coordinator for the Library. Coffee and snacks will be provided.

If you have any questions about this event, please contact Nancy Stimson at nstimson@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-6321.

Looking for that Next Good Book?

You could find your next good book to read in the list of recently announced National Book Award (NBA) finalists. The NBA is one of the most distinguished literary prizes in the country. Browse book reviews and the list of NBA finalist authors in the categories of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people’s literature.

Search the UC San Diego Library’s online catalog, Roger, to find copies of these books. And, if we don’t have the book, yet, search the interconnected San Diego Libraries online catalog, Circuit, and have the book delivered to UCSD from a local public library.

What’s going to be the next good book you read?

NBA Finalists 2014

 

 

Research Smarter: Fall Workshops @ The Library

Fall quarter we’re hosting free workshops at the Library for UC San Diego students, faculty and staff. Taught by UCSD Student ComputerLibrarians, learn how to effectively use PowerPoint, research databases, search for patents, manage your research electronically, and more.

For workshop descriptions and to register, please visit:
http://libraries.ucsd.edu/services/instruction/workshops-at-the-library.html

Fall Workshops:

PowerPoint Basics
Thu, Oct 16, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
Biomedical Library Building

PowerPoint Enhancements
Thu, Oct 23, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
Biomedical Library Building                                                Classroom library

PubMed – Beyond the Essentials
Wed, Oct 29, 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Biomedical Library Building

PowerPoint Posters
Thu, Oct 30, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
Biomedical Library Building

Faculty CV Clinic
Thu, Oct 30, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

Patents and Patent Searching
Tue, Nov 4, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

PowerPoint Presentations
Thu, Nov 6, 12:00 – 2:00 pm              BLB Geisel Collage
Biomedical Library Building

Managing Citations
Thu, Nov 13, 12:00 – 1:30 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

RefWorks
Wed, Nov 19, 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Biomedical Library Building

EndNote
Thu, Dec 4, 12:00 – 1:30 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

Presentations on UC Open Access Policy – Oct 22 and Nov 3

The Library will host 2 presentations for faculty, staff and others who want to learn more about the new UC Open Access Policy (which takes effect at UCSD on November 1) and how to deposit their articles in eScholarship.

Please RSVP here. You can also contact your subject librarian directly for individual assistance on uploading articles.

  • October 22, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, Geisel Library Building, Seuss Room, or
  • November 3, 2014, 2:00-3:30 pm, Geisel Library Building, Seuss Room

What does “deposit their articles” mean?

For any article covered by the policy, faculty should deposit the author’s final version in eScholarship (UC’s open access repository) or deposit it in another OA repository and provide eScholarship with a link. If your publisher requires you to opt out in order to publish with them or if you want to opt out of the policy for a particular article or another reason, you can do that on the waiver and embargo page.

The UC Open Access Policy was passed last year by the UC Academic Senate to ensure “that future research articles authored by faculty at all 10 campuses of UC will be made available to the public at no charge.”

Each Faculty member grants to the University of California a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, for the purpose of making their articles widely and freely available in an open access repository. Any other systematic uses of the licensed articles by the University of California must be approved by the Academic Senate. This policy does not transfer copyright ownership, which remains with Faculty authors under existing University of California policy. (Policy)

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series: “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” Themes

This year’s Holocaust Living History Workshop Series, a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the University’swomen with Swastikas Judaic Studies Program, will explore the themes of “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” as they represent survivor experiences.

For nearly 70 years, historians, sociologists, literary theorists, and other academics have tried to make sense of the Holocaust, one of the 20th century’s most disturbing and enigmatic calamities. Despite the massive amount of scholarship that has been generated, some stories and experiences remain lost, neglected or forgotten outright. As part of its mission to educate and raise awareness, the Holocaust Living History Workshop focuses on both well-known and less familiar stories and narratives of the Shoah. This fall’s lecture series sheds light on those lost, forgotten, or poorly documented stories and experiences from the past, to promote a richer understanding of the Holocaust’s myriad dimensions.

Interested members of the public and campus community are invited to attend the events and hear local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars share their stories. Participants can also learn about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest database of Holocaust testimony. All sessions, free and open to the public, will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room, from 5 to 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

 

Oct. 22: Getting Here: An Odyssey through WW II /Ruth Hohberg           gulag_460x276

Born in Bielsko, Poland, Ruth Weiss Hohberg fled eastward during WWII. Her parents were forced into a Siberian labor camp and then relocated to Uzbekistan, where Ruth attended school. At war’s end, she returned to her hometown, only to find the population unwilling to accept returning Jews. After an interlude in Sweden, she arrived in the United States. Her long ordeal depicts an experience that is less familiar to scholars of the Holocaust, yet it is in urgent need of exposure. Hohberg is an artist and writer and lives in Rancho Bernardo.

 

Nov. 13: Hitler’s Furies: Ordinary Women? /Wendy Lower

Nazi womenAward-winning historian Wendy Lower delves into the lives and experiences of German women in the Nazi killing fields. Her research chillingly debunks the age-old myth of the German woman as mother and breeder, removed from the tough, male-dominated world of politics and war. The women Lower labels “furies” humiliated their victims, plundered their goods, and often killed them. And, like many of their male counterparts, they got away with murder. Lower is the John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna University and has published widely on the Shoah in Eastern Europe.

To find out more about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman, the program coordinator at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://libraries.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Special Event for New Graduate Students

The UC San Diego Library invites new graduate and professional students to attend an Open House on Thursday, October 16 Grad Students UCSDfrom 4-6 pm in the Geisel Library’s Seuss Room.

Mix and mingle with UCSD Subject Librarians, connect with graduate students, learn more about the myriad of Library resources available to support your studies, and enjoy refreshments.  Subject Librarians across disciplines will be available to answer questions, showcase resources from a wide range of disciplines, and highlight Library services particularly useful to graduate-level research.

Grad Student UCOPPlease sign up for this event at: http://tinyurl.com/ucsdgradopenhouse.

Note: This event is for new graduate and professional students only.

Contact Nancy Stimson, nstimson@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-6321,  with questions about the Open House.

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