DML uses SketchFab to create 360 degree photos

SketchDigital cameras are used to capture images in full stereo surround for use in virtual reality systems. These images can cover any field of view, including 360° by 180° spherical panoramas. Two photographic cylinders are created with identical dimensions, capturing the perspective as seen from each eye position. When these cylinders are mapped to a spherical surface, full stereo in all directions is achieved. This technique allows photographic imaging to create the virtual environment itself. The complete stereo image that is created by this technique can be viewed in any direction that is supported by the virtual reality system design.fab allows us to embed 360 photo viewers in browser now. All we have to do is make a sphere, apply the panorama as a texture, and move the camera inside of it. These photos comes from the CaveCam collection now hosted on the Geisel Library Digital Collections site.

This imaging technique complements existing technologies such as LiDAR or SfM providing more detailed textural information that can be used in conjunction for analysis and visualization. The advantages of this digital imaging technique for cultural heritage can be seen in its non-invasive and rapid capture of heritage sites for documentation, analysis, and immersive visualization. The technique is applied to several significant heritage sites in Luxor, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

Sketchfab now allows for embed 360 photo viewers in browsers. These photos comes from the CaveCam collection now hosted on the Geisel Library Digital Collections site (CaveCam Collection, UC San Diego Library).

North Korean Poster Collection

North Korea, a closed nation that was created during a tumultuous time post World War II and the Korean Civil War of the early 1950s, has been in the news a lot lately. Primary source materials, including evidence, artifacts or other items created within the boundaries of North Korea, are hard to find. Very little information is allowed to flow over the country’s two borders with South Korea and China. The UC San Diego Library has one window available into this corner of the world, a collection of 66 North Korean propaganda posters. The original posters are held in the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, and digital copies are available through the Library’s Digital Collections website.  

The posters are high-quality hand painted reproductions of printed posters that exclaim slogans and sayings to bolster the morale of the North Korean populace. From protecting the Supreme Commander to reuniting the Asian continent the posters are a way to guide the thoughts and actions of the North Korean people and make them proud of the actions of their government. They use bright colors to attract the eye and most are large in size to overwhelm and consume the viewer. The posters, with catchy slogans and cartoon-like images attempt to persuade the North Korean people to work hard, be loyal to the government and be proud of their heritage.

This collection of posters, created between 1985 and 2002, is unique in Calisphere and Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). These two online treasure troves collect images from a wide variety of organizations, including UC San Diego. Calisphere collects digital material from educational and cultural heritage institutions throughout California, while DPLA has a broader scope that includes all fifty states and institutions like Harvard University, ARTstor and Library of Congress. While other institutions may have collections of North Korean propaganda posters in their physical collections, UC San Diego Library is unique in making these resources accessible through these two popular online portals.

Geisel Library Exhibits Focus on Civil Rights Era’s Impact

 

Photo by: Spider Martin, National Archives.

John Lewis: #GoodTrouble
June 2018
Exhibit, Geisel Library, main floor, west wing
Digital Exhibit, Geisel Library, main floor, east wing

“Sometimes you have to get in trouble–good trouble, necessary trouble–to make a way out of no way.” – John Lewis

Georgia Congressman John Lewis has been a longtime advocate for civil and human rights. His story starts in rural Alabama where he honed his preaching skills by preaching to his chickens. In college, he helped organize sit-ins in Nashville. Students occupied lunch counters and Freedom Riders rode interstate buses through the South, risking their lives to test new anti-segregation laws. In 1963 he was the youngest speaker at the March on Washington. In 1965, Lewis was front and center on the Edmund Pettus Bridge on “Bloody Sunday” when Alabama state troopers attacked folks peacefully marching from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

This activism leads to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Lewis has served as U.S. Representative of Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District since 1986 where he continues to be a supporter for justice and non-violent protest. More recently he has been a strong advocate for immigration policy reform and gun safety legislation.

The Library created two exhibits to highlight his long-standing commitment to activism. The exhibits include materials from Lewis’ March trilogy, as well as materials from the library’s collection on the Civil Rights Movement.

UC San Diego Library Launches Food for Fine$ Drive, Waiving Library Fines for Food Donations

Food for Fine$ 
Sunday, May 27- Saturday, June 9 
Geisel Library & Biomedical Library buildings

Bring food items to donate to either Library Front Desk between May 27 to June 9 (Weeks 9 & 10) for $2 per item off your library fines from Spring Quarter. All donated items go to UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry.

Guidelines

  • Fines eligible  for dismissal include course reserve and recall overdues, billing fees, and processing fees (no replacement charges)
  • Fines must be from the current term: Spring Quarter Weeks 1-8
  • Earn credits to a maximum of $40
  • Fines already paid may be credited
  • Food donations accepted at Geisel & BLB Front Desks
  • Small, individually-wrapped items in a larger bundle will count as one item (e.g. fruit cups in 4-pack)

Most Needed Items

  • Cereal, oatmeal, rice, pasta/sauce
  • Canned meats (tuna, chicken, ham)
  • Dry or canned beans
  • Peanut butter or granola bars
  • Canned soup or cooking oils
  • Canned fruits or vegetables

Read more…

Learning to Curate History: Arts & Humanities Undergraduates Explore the Library’s Special Collections & Archives

By Anthony King

UC San Diego Arts and Humanities undergraduates explore Geisel Library archives, presenting exhibits on Tijuana tourism and South Pacific expeditions

A selection from the Tijuana Photograph Postcard Collection, Special Collections & Archives, UC San Diego Library

Have you ever wanted to curate your own museum exhibit? Three students from the UC San Diego Division of Arts and Humanities got the chance to develop their own exhibitions, culled from material housed at the UC San Diego Library.

The students participated in the very first, two-quarter undergraduate curating course: independent study opportunities made available by the Institute of Arts and Humanities and the Library’s Special Collections & Archives. The curating project culminated in two exhibitions currently on display at Geisel Library, on the main floor leading to the Seuss Room.

“We are tremendously excited by our very first two exhibits because it not only provided a tactile practical experience for our undergraduate curators, but they have been able to teach the UC San Diego community something new and exciting about the past,” said Mark Hanna, a professor in the Department of History and associate director of the Institute of Arts and Humanities. “I enjoy watching students explore the exhibits each time I go to the library.”  Read more…

UC San Diego Library’s ‘Food for Fine$’ Program Waives Overdue Fees for a Good Cause

The UC San Diego Library is teaming up with the UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry to offer students a unique alternative to paying recall or reserve library fines with nonperishable food donations.

In support of the food pantry, the Library’s Food for Fine$ is a new initiative encouraging students to offer food donations to receive a $2 credit per eligible item toward their existing fines for recent overdue Library materials.

“This initiative demonstrates the Library’s commitment to the UC San Diego community by providing needed relief to some students who might otherwise skip a meal to save money,” said Kymberly Goodson, program director for Spaces, Lending, & Access (SLA). “We’re thrilled about this partnership with the Food Pantry. It’s something we’ve never done at the Library, and we hope we can continue it in the future.”

To participate, students can drop off nonperishable foods at the Geisel or BLB Front Desks, including canned meats, canned vegetables, boxes of cereal, cooking oils, and much more (see details of eligible donations and fines here). No glass containers will be accepted and food cannot be repackaged, damaged, opened, or expired. Food for Fine$ kicks off May 27 and runs through June 9.

“Only fines incurred in Weeks 1 through 8 of Spring Quarter will be credited by donated goods, up to a $40 maximum,” said Goodson. “Alternately, participants can receive a credit for already paid fines from this time period.”

The UC San Diego Library joins a network of other universities with similar programs, such as UC Irvine Libraries, U-T at Arlington, and Texas A&M. Food for Fine$ originated in public libraries as a way to further contribute to their communities while also providing a way for library users to decrease or pay their fines and begin using their library cards again.

“We’ve seen an increase in students using the pantry as tuition costs rise. We currently serve over 700 students per week. A 2012 UC Undergraduate Experience Survey showed 25 percent of UC San Diego students ‘often’ skip meals to save cash,” said Sherlock Li, manager at the Triton Food Pantry. “With summer around the corner, Food for Fine$ is a great way for students to clear their cupboards before moving out and keep the Food Pantry stocked.”

The Triton Food Pantry was launched by Associated Students in February 2015 to ensure the academic success of students of all backgrounds. All registered students with a valid UC San Diego identification card can visit the pantry once per week to get up to 10 points worth of food. Fresh produce is also available to supplement students’ needs.”

For more information about the Food for Fine$ program, contact staff at either the Geisel or BLB Front Desks.

‘Master Storyteller’ Luis Alberto Urrea to be Keynote Speaker for 2018 Dinner in the Library

 

San Diego-raised novelist and UC San Diego alumnus, Luis Alberto Urrea ‘77, will be the featured speaker at this year’s Dinner in the Library on Friday, September 21, 2018 in Geisel Library.

Hailed by NPR as a “master storyteller with a rock and roll heart,” Urrea is a prolific author who draws inspiration for his novels from his binational upbringing and dual cultural experiences to explore greater themes of love, loss and triumph.

Urrea was born in Mexico, living the first part of his youth in Tijuana before moving to San Diego in the 1950s. Similar to other writers, he got his start in literature writing poems to impress girls in junior high. His early heroes were all rock stars, but not being musically inclined Urrea chose to follow in the steps of his literary role models. Even though Urrea’s UC San Diego journey began as a theater major, it was the Literature Department that ultimately led him to graduation day. Today, Urrea is most recognized as a border writer, though he says, “I am more interested in bridges, not borders.”

A 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction and member of the Latino Literature Hall of Fame, Urrea is the best-selling author of 17 books and has won numerous awards for his poetry, fiction and essays.  Read more…

Digital Collections Website Serves as One-Stop Resource for State’s History & More

Whether you’re a researcher, a teacher or simply a curious citizen, this one-stop digital platform offers unique cultural archival resources to California history lovers.

Developed and maintained by UC’s California Digital Library, Calisphere provides free access to over 1,025,000 digitized items including photographs, letters, artwork, diaries, oral histories, films, advertisements, musical recordings and documents. The oldest digitized item in Calisphere is an Armenian Manuscript Bible dating back to 1121 A.D.

Calisphere is now one of the largest collections of digital archival material in the state following a significant makeover in 2015—and continues to add new resources every week. These collections have been digitized and curated by all ten UC campuses and other notable libraries, archives and museums throughout California. Visitors can access selections from the collections from any device, at any time and no registration is required. The UC San Diego Library is a major contributor with over 90,000 digital objects in Calisphere. The website also serves as a hub, gathering content and contributing nationally to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)Read more…

Weeklong Summer Training Program for Scholarly Communications Starts July 30

125 participants attended the 2017 FSCI at UC San Diego

 

Do you want to be part of a growing community that aims to transform and improve the future of research communication and e-Scholarship? Then join us for the second installment of the Force11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI) from July 30 to August 3, 2018 at the MET Building on the UC San Diego campus. The program, hosted by the UC San Diego Library, provides learning opportunities for both the expert and the novice in scholarly communication.

The five-day intensive summer training institute is designed to help researchers, students, administrators, librarians, post docs and others navigate the ever-changing and increasingly complex scholarly communications landscape. FSCI will incorporate intensive coursework, seminar participation, group activities, lectures, and hands-on training taught by worldwide leading experts in various aspects of scholarly communication. Participants will attend courses on a wide range of topics including author carpentry, bad publishing, reproducible code and data, software citation, public humanities and more.  Read more…

A New Model for Open Access: Radically Accessible and Transparent

Hear about advances in peer review and options for publishing!

May 15, 2018 at 1:00 pm

Geisel Library Dunst Classroom.

peer review illustration

Image Credit: Flickr User AJC1
Creative Commons License: BY-SA

A New Model for Open Access (OA): Radically Accessible and Transparent 

What exactly does the “access” mean in OA? Some university presses have begun to publish works open access, but this often means that either the authors or their institution have to come up with large subventions to make this possible. We will discuss the benefits of OA broadly but also platinum OA in particular, which is the version that is neither market dependent nor contingent upon subventions.

Along with its benefits, OA has many challenges, one of which is a reputation problem. Presses are dealing with this is through rigorous peer review. But when we say something is peer reviewed, what exactly do we mean? Scholarly publishers of all kinds (OA and traditional, commercial and non-profit) claim that their uniqueness pivots on the process of peer review; however, when we ask individual presses what form that process takes, the answers vary. In this talk, we will discuss the work that is being sponsored by Lever and MIT on a signaling system for peer review transparency. We will also discuss the unique challenge that DH projects pose in the peer review process.

Speaker Bio:

Beth Bouloukos acquires broadly in the humanities and social sciences for the open access and digitally native Amherst College and Lever Presses. She previously acquired books in education, Latin American/Latinx studies, and gender and sexuality studies at SUNY Press for seven years. Beth received her PhD from Cornell University where she researched Latin American literature, film, and culture through a feminist lens.  She has also served as a visiting assistant professor at Fairfield University and the University at Albany, SUNY.

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