Eugenia: A Book Talk with UC San Diego Librarian Sarah Buck Kachaluba

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Eugenia, a little-known gem of utopian/dystopian fiction published in Mexico in the early 20th century takes place in a eugenically engineered society of the future. Long before dystopian classics by Aldous Huxley and George Orwell emerged, Eugenia tackled some of the most important challenges of modern society, such as population growth, reproductive behavior and technologies, experimentation with gender roles, and changes in family dynamics. Nearly a century later–in February 2016–an English translation of Eugenia has been published, translated and edited by Sarah Buck Kachaluba, the UC San Diego Library’s Latin American Studies and Iberian Languages and Literatures Librarian, and Aaron Dziubinskyj, Associate Professor of Spanish, DePauw University.  Buck Kachaluba will discuss and sign copies of the new book.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP’s are not required. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, contact Mariah Fellows at mfellows@ucsd.edu.

Maria Clara Sharupi Poetry Reading

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3:00 – 4:00pm

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Reading in Shuar Language and Spanish

Maria Clara Sharupi Jua has written and published poetry in Shuar and Spanish, she has also read her work in venues around Latin America and the United States.  Sharupi has co-authored three books and is currently working on a new book of short stories entitled Tarimiat.  She also served on a team of professional Shuar translators that edited the official translation of the Ecuadorian constitution from Spanish into Shuar Chicham. Sharupi Jua was born and raised in the Amazon rain forest and her work mixes imagery from nature and the traditions of her indigenous culture.  Such imagery and traditions are central to the folklore and artistic expressions of Amazonian peoples.

The Shuar nation includes more than 110,000 peoples settled primarily within the nation-state of Ecuador, in various upper and basin river areas, including those of the Amazon.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Sarah Buck-Kachaluba at sbuckkachaluba@ucsd.edu.

Open Access Publishing Workshop (for Grads, Postdocs) – April 26

OAlogo Is Open Access Publishing right for you?
Expand the reach of your scholarly work

Workshop for Postdocs and Graduate Students
Tuesday, April 26, 2016 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Horizon Room, Career Services Center

Register at https://libraryopenaccess2016.eventbrite.com

Read more…

Workshop: Increasing Openness and Reproducibility in Quantitative Research

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There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Center for Open Science, to learn easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work. The workshop will be hands-on. Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

Topics covered:

  • Project documentation
  • Version control
  • Pre-Analysis plans
  • Open source tools like the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework to easily implement these concepts in a scientific workflow.

This workshop is aimed at faculty, staff, and students across disciplines, who are engaged in quantitative research. The workshop does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows.

RSVP:  https://goo.gl/bIHJ5Z

LOCATION: San Diego Supercomputer Center in the Synthesis Center, La Jolla, CA 92093
DATE: Friday, April 29, 2016
TIME: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

The workshop will be led by April Clyburne-Sherin, Reproducible Research Evangelist at the Center for Open Science and coheads their training programs for reproducible research methods. She has an MS in Epidemiology from the University of Guelph.

Social Media Data Now Available via Crimson Hexagon

Crimson Hexagon logo

Do you use social media posts as a data source? The Library is piloting (through September 30, 2017) a subscription to Crimson Hexagon, a web-based library of social media posts (updated in real-time) and social media analysis software platform. Posts can be searched using keywords and then either downloaded for off-line analysis with third party tools or analyzed using Crimson Hexagon’s data visualizations.

Data sources include:

  • Twitter: Full Twitter Firehose (all public tweets) through a direct partnership with Twitter beginning July 2010. Twitter content via the Gardenhose from July 2009.
  • Tumblr: Full Tumblr Firehose through a direct partnership with Tumblr beginning January 2015.
  • Google Plus
  • Blogs, for example blogspot.com.
  • Forums, for example reddit.com and yahoo.com.
  • Facebook
  • Instagram Hashtags
  • Reviews: Product-based reviews from consumer sites such as tripadvisor.com and amazon.com.
  • News: Fact-based articles by formal news organizations, such as CNN, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, etc.
  • Comments: Reader responses to blogs, news, and forum posts.
  • YouTube: Content from video descriptions and comments.
  • Weibo*: As of September 1, 2015, currently unavailable due to the Chinese Government has forcing SINA to suspend all data leaving China through any and all data delivery vehicles pending an official policy regarding foreign use.

For more information on using Crimson Hexagon, see our guide or contact Annelise Sklar (asklar@ucsd.edu), Social Sciences Collection Coordinator, or Tim Dennis (timdennis@ucsd.edu), Data Services & Collections Librarian.

Las Misiones Jesuíticas – Digital Exhibit on Display in Geisel Library Through March 16

Las Misiones Jesuíticas de la región Guaranítica: Una experiencia cultural y social Americana, curated by Ramon Gutiérrez (Universidad de Granada, Spain), is on display through March 16, 2016 at the UC San Diego Library (Geisel West, 2nd floor). The digital exhibit, composed of various images of Jesuit missions and mission communities operating in the greater South American Amazon region, illustrates the economic, cultural, and social ideas and practices that gave rise to this mission system.

Founded by Ignacio de Loyola, Francisco Javier, and others in 1539, the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) would become an effective instrument in the Counter-Reformation. Jesuit evangelizers arrived in Brazil in 1556 and moved north to Peru and Mexico in 1572. As they carried out their evangelizing work among indigenous peoples, Jesuits also developed professional skills, so that their expansion into Europe, Asia, and America forged spaces of worldwide scientific development.

A lecture about the exhibit will be held on Wednesday, March 16 from 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room. Guest speaker, Graciela Maria Viñuales (Ph.D. Architecture, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman), is a specialist in the preservation and conservation of architectural heritage and restoration of monuments in Ibero-American cultures. This event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit can also be seen at the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies Conference, at the Maritime Museum of San Diego, March 17, 2016 – March 20, 2016 and at the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies (CILAS), March 21-March 24, 2016.

The slides displayed in this digital exhibit were initially created in 2013 for the Centro Cultural Borges, Buenos Aires. It has also appeared at Universidad de Congreso (Mendoza, Argentina), Universidad de Cantabria (Santander, Spain), Instituto Ramón Llull (Barcelona, Spain), Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico), Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (Mexico), Universidad de Lima (Perú), and Universidad Católica (Asunción, Paraguay).

The Amazonia project at UC San Diego draws on, archives, produces, and allows researchers to view digital texts, geo-referenced maps of relevant information, and 3D images of objects, urban/agricultural environments, and the forest itself in order to trace and represent this under-explored history.

 

Book publishing that’s Open Access and high quality? Consider Luminos from UC Press.

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UC San Diego authors in the market for a publisher should consider Luminos, the Open Access (OA) publishing program for scholarly monographs from UC Press. Luminos titles go through the same rigorous selection and peer review processes as all other UC press books and are published in both digital and traditional formats. The digital editions of all Luminos-published titles are available free of charge to anyone in the world, which makes them widely accessible to readers regardless of their home institution’s library budget and ideal for assigned course readings in the age of prohibitively high textbook prices. The traditional print copies are available for purchase, review copies, and other publicity such as conference booths.  Both versions will be identical in content and layout, but digital editions can also include live links and interactive multimedia such as audio, video, or maps.

In the OA model, publishing costs are shifted from the final product’s readers to the content creators, in this case: the author and UC Press. Authors are not paid royalties, as any revenue from print sales helps offset the costs of the OA digital editions. UC Press calculates the cost of OA monograph publishing at approximately $15,000; the author’s contribution for University of California faculty, books based on UC dissertations, and books in series where the editor is UC faculty is $5,000.

To support this venture, UC San Diego Library will cover the (full) author fee of $5000 for UC San Diego authors’ accepted books. For more information, contact Annelise Sklar (asklar@ucsd.edu), the Social Sciences Collection Coordinator.

Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire

Join the Library for a discussion and book signing with Mark Hanna, Historian & Author of Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Faculty Club, The Lounge

Light refreshments will be served.

Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire_LARGEMark Hanna is an associate professor of History at UC San Diego, and one of the nation’s top authorities on pirates. Hanna is the author of the new book, Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire (2015, University of North Carolina Press). In his book, he sheds a fresh light on pirates, traditionally depicted as fearless adventurers on the high seas. He examines the crucial role that pirates played on land by contributing to the commercial and economic development of port towns in early America and the British Empire. Hanna’s earlier work, The Pirate’s Nest: The Impact of Piracy on Newport and Charles Town, 1670-1740, challenged prevailing interpretations of piracy and also harnessed the phenomenon of piracy to illuminate the history of early America in the Atlantic world.

This event is free and open to the public. No registration is required. For more information, contact Mariah Fellows at mfellows@ucsd.edu or 858-534-0533. For directions and parking information, click here.

Virtual Victoriana: Roots of 3-D

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A Holmes stereoscope from the 19th century.

Attendee of the 2015 Google I/O conference inspects Google Cardboard. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stereoscopic devices of the 1800’s were used for entertainment and educational purposes. Flat postcard images of exotic locales and architectural wonders were transformed into three-dimensional visits via elegant hand-held stereoscopes. These simple devices are not unlike the cardboard Google glasses that were recently distributed by the New York Times. Important 20th century tools such as 3-D arial maps are directly related to these Victorian diversions.

See these old and new tools at a small exhibit at the UC San Diego Library (Geisel West, 2nd floor) through March 2016.

The exhibit includes stereoscopic books of interest from the Library’s circulating collection, tracing current virtual surgery and modern 3-D motion pictures back to these earliest novelties. Devices on display are simple but effective: original and re-issued stereoscopes, Google glasses, old-school 3-D glasses, early Bakelite “view-masters” and, of course, many Victorian Era stereoscopic postcards.

For more information, contact Scott Paulson at 858-822-5758 or spaulson@ucsd.edu.

What’s Climate Change To You?

What's Climate Changepic

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Events Room, Biomedical Library Building

Light refreshments will be served.

Join us as Dr. Bruce Bekkar, a UC San Diego alumnus and a member of Doctors for Climate Health with the American Lung Association, discusses how climate change is affecting human health, and what we can do to prevent a climate crisis.

Dr. Bekkar just recently left his San Diego medical practice to devote his time to local and global environmental issues. Last spring, he completed Climate Reality Leadership Training, which included instruction from Vice President Al Gore and some of the nation’s leading climate scientists.

“Having been a physician for nearly 30 years not only helps me to understand the risks that a destabilized climate poses to life on earth, but it also gives me the authority and access to the audiences that  need to hear this message,” said Bekkar. “Put another way, as an obstetrician, I worked to preserve human life and helped new ones get started. As a climate activist, I’m working to preserve human health and to preserve nature, which is necessary for our survival as well as our happiness.”  Read more…

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