Special Event for New Graduate Students

The UC San Diego Library invites new graduate and professional students to attend an Open House on Thursday, October 16 Grad Students UCSDfrom 4-6 pm in the Geisel Library’s Seuss Room.

Mix and mingle with UCSD Subject Librarians, connect with graduate students, learn more about the myriad of Library resources available to support your studies, and enjoy refreshments.  Subject Librarians across disciplines will be available to answer questions, showcase resources from a wide range of disciplines, and highlight Library services particularly useful to graduate-level research.

Grad Student UCOPPlease sign up for this event at: http://tinyurl.com/ucsdgradopenhouse.

Note: This event is for new graduate and professional students only.

Contact Nancy Stimson, nstimson@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-6321,  with questions about the Open House.

Welcome! Get Started @ The Library

Students Instagram CollageOn behalf of everyone at the UC San Diego Library, welcome to campus for the Fall Quarter!

To help you get started, below is a list of our top ten things to know about the Library:

  1. The UC San Diego Library has two library buildings on campus – the Geisel Library and Biomedical Library Buildings. Each are located on opposite ends of Library Walk.
  2. Library Hours are online.
  3. The Geisel Library building is open 24/5 during the quarter and 24/7 during Finals Week.
  4. Course Reserves are course-related materials that your instructors have made available in the Library or online. Use the Course Reserves system to look them up.
  5. Find books in the library, computing labs, printers, etc. quickly using this handy webpage.
  6. Easily find research materials for your course assignments using our Course & Subject Guides.
  7. Reserve Study Rooms in Geisel and the Biomedical Library Buildings online.
  8. Have questions? Save time and Ask a Librarian. You can text message us, chat online 24/7 with a UC librarian, stop by in-person, phone or email us. We have subject librarian experts in every subject area that can help you with your course-work and research assignments.
  9. Use our mobile website, and see the availability of computers in every computing lab on campus.
  10. Stay Connected to the Library on your favorite social media!    Social Media Icons connect

Journal Publication and Ethics: A Discussion (Aug 20)

rsc

Dr Robert D. Eagling, executive editor of several flagship journals from the Royal Society of Chemistry like Chemical Communications and Chemical Science, will be here on August 20 to talk about publication ethics. Whether you have published a number of articles or still working toward your first article, this is a great opportunity to hear an editor’s perspective, discuss some real examples, and to ask questions.

The RSC publishes journals in chemistry, engineering (including nanotechnology and materials science), environmental science, and the biological and health sciences. This talk is open to all regardless of program or major, and graduate students and postdocs are especially welcome.

Date: August 20, 2:00-4:00pm
Location: Price Center West Ballroom
Light refreshments will be served

Please RSVP to: info@rsc.org

Questions: please contact tmvogel@ucsd.edu

Nature journals – new additions

UCSD Library has added electronic subscriptions to the following titles from Nature Publishing Group:

And UC has purchased the backfiles for the following titles perpetually back to volume 1 at the Nature site:

ChemBioOffice 14 and SciFinder

The campus-wide site license for ChemBioOffice/ChemDraw is funded by ACMS and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and administered by ACMS. Questions about the license or registration codes should be directed to software@ucsd.edu. For questions about SciFinder, contact Teri Vogel.

UCSD faculty, staff and students can now download the new ChemBioOffice 14. Among the enhancements, you can send your ChemDraw structure and reaction queries directly to SciFinder without having to copy/paste or import into the SciFinder structure editor. Instructions and technical information after the jump.

Read more…

Four Students Win Library Research Prize

Congratulations to the 2014 Undergraduate Library Research Prize Winners!  ULRP2014Jessica Gross, Maarouf Saad, Jessica Knapp, Adam Simon (not shown)

Co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UCSD Alumni Association, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the annual prize includes cash awards of $1000 and $500 for first and second place. Awards are given in two categories, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities, and Physical and Life Sciences, to undergraduate students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and use of The Library’s resources in research undertaken at UCSD. We applaud this year’s winners for their intellectual prowess, and stellar critical thinking and research skills.

In the Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities category, first prize went to Jessica Knapp for her project, “The Effects of Mental Illness on the Javanese Family.” Second prize was awarded to Jessica Gross for her project, “Religious Women as Apothecaries and Practitioners in Early Modern France.”

First prize in the Life and Physical Sciences category went to Maarouf Saad for his project, “Alcohol-Dysregulated MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Cancer.” And, second prize was awarded to Adam Simon for his project, “Synthesis of a Novel 2-Deoxystreptamine Mimetic: Building Blocks for Aminoglycoside Analogs.”

To be considered for the Undergraduate Libraries Research Prize, students must be nominated by faculty members and must participate in either the annual UC San Diego Undergraduate Research Conference held in the spring, or in other university programs that foster and recognize student research and scholarship. The Undergraduate Research Conference is one of three major undergraduate scholarly meetings that the Academic Enrichment Programs coordinate each year that afford students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to present findings of research conducted under the guidance of UC San Diego faculty members.

 

 

Natural Standard Database Access Restored

Access to the Natural Standard database on integrative medicine was not available for UCSD users in April and much of May due to licensing and renewal problems. CDL/UCSF licensing efforts have concluded and we now have access again. Thank you for your patience. The new site is https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

Additional resources for natural product medicine include the following:

UCSD & the Local Ecosystem: Insights from Wireless & Biotech

UC San Diego and the Local Ecosystem: Insights from Wireless and Biotech
UC San Diego Library Seuss Room
Thursday, May 15, 2014
3:30 – 5:00PM

UC San Diego has played a central role in the development of the San Diego high-technology economy in both the wireless and biotechnology industries. Dean Mary Walshok (UCSD) and Professor Steven Casper (Keck Graduate Institute) will present results from their chapters on UC San Diego in the forthcoming Stanford University Press book Public Universities and Regional Development: Insights from the University of California edited by Martin Kenney (UC Davis) and David Mowery (UC Berkeley).

SDTA_may_15_event

Reaxys Update

This week, Elsevier released an updated Reaxys interface with some new search features. Reaxys is one of the core databases to search chemical literature, particularly reactions and substance property data.

The new features:

  • An Ask Reaxys Toolbar that allows you to run topic searches that you would normally start from the Reactions or Substances menu, like “synthesis of taxol,” “preparation of Ni(PPh3)2Cl2,” “19F nmr of fluorobenzene,” “melting of steel,” or “crystal structure of MgSO4.”
  • A Molecular Formula query builder where you can select atoms (plus counts, charges, and ranges) as well as groups and series.
  • With the Alloy search, you can search for alloys, glasses and ceramic materials by the percentages, which can be expressed by weight, atom or volume.
  • The Reaxys Tree offers an alternative way to search the entries and properties. You can browse through the various groupings (chemical transformations, physico chemical properties, etc.) or search across the tree for an entry or property (calorimetry, Wittig reaction, modulus) and run a literature search on the selected results.

There is one content change. For literature references, from mid-2013 going forward, bioactivity data (including pharmacological data as well as toxicological data related to biological specimens) will no longer be visible in Reaxys. You will still see literature citations, but instead of data or other information about the bioactivity, there will be a comment like “physiological behaviour discussed.” The legacy bioactivity data will still be visible.

UC San Diego Library Receives Personal Papers of Jonas Salk

Media Contact:  Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667 or ddavies@ucsd.edu

The University of California, San Diego Library has become the official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk, noted physician, virologist, and humanitarian, best known for his development of the world’s first successful vaccine for the prevention of polio.              Salk1

The papers—which constitute almost 600 linear feet (or nearly 900 boxes)—were recently donated to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections by Salk’s sons, Peter, Darrell and Jonathan, all of whom, like their father, trained as physicians and are involved in medical and scientific activities.

Salk2While recognized world-wide for his significant contributions, Jonas Salk is particularly noted locally for his founding of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies adjacent to UC San Diego and the impact this had on the city’s metamorphosis into a major center for biomedical and scientific research and discovery. The Institute will celebrate the Jonas Salk Centenary in the fall of 2014 and, as part of this notable milestone, the Library will hold a major exhibition of the Salk Papers and collaborate with the Institute on other celebratory events.

“It is a great honor for the Library to be the official repository for Jonas Salk’s papers,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “The UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses the papers of some of the world’s most prominent and accomplished scientists, including Francis Crick, Stanley Miller, and Leo Szilard, as well as Nobel Laureates Harold Urey, Hannes Alfven, and Maria Goeppert Mayer. The papers of Jonas Salk are an excellent complement to these materials.”

The Salk papers constitute an exhaustive source of documentation on Salk’s professional and scientific activities. The papers cover the period from the mid-1940s to his death in 1995; best documented are activities largely related to the development of the Salk polio vaccine in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and the founding of the Salk Institute. The papers cover general correspondence, files relating to polio, his writings, photographs, artifacts—including two dictating machines—personal writings, and various research materials.   Salk4

The collection includes correspondence with a number of prominent scientists and others,  including Basil O’Connor and officers of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis/March of Dimes; immunologists Thomas Francis and Albert Sabin; physicist and biologist Leo Szilard; mathematician and philosopher Jacob Bronowski; architect Louis Kahn and other important figures in the worlds of art, science, education, public administration, and humanitarianism.

Salk came to La Jolla following a career in clinical medicine and virology research. After obtaining his M.D. degree at the New York University School of Medicine in 1939, he served as a staff physician at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He then joined his mentor, Dr. Thomas Francis, as a research fellow at the University of Michigan. There he worked to develop an influenza vaccine at the behest of the U.S. Army. In 1947, he was appointed director of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of  Pittsburgh School of Medicine, where he began to put together the techniques that would lead to his polio vaccine.

Salk3Salk’s research caught the attention of  O’Connor, then president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, and the organization decided to fund his efforts to develop a killed virus vaccine against the most frightening scourge of the time—paralytic poliomyelitis. Given the fear and anxiety that polio caused during the first half of the century, the vaccine’s success in 1955 made Salk an international hero, and he spent the late 1960s refining the vaccine and establishing the scientific principles behind it.

Salk chose San Diego as the site for what was to become the Salk Institute for Biological Studies after a year touring the country for the right location. In June, 1960, through a referendum, the citizens of San Diego overwhelmingly voted to make a gift of 27 pueblo lots in the La Jolla area, just west of the new University of California San Diego campus, for Salk’s dream. The Institute began operation in temporary quarters in 1963, and permanent buildings designed by architect Kahn were completed in 1967. The complex soon gained international fame for its extremely modern and austere design, which now enjoys a cult following among architecture and design buffs. Salk served as the Institute’s director until 1975.

 

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Events Calendar

<< Apr 2015 >>
SMTWTFS
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 1 2

Twitter Feed