Digital Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive Acquired

A rich digital archive documenting the UFW Farmworkers’ Movement in Central California from 1962 to 1993 has been acquired by the University of California, San Diego Library. The archive, which was developed by LeRoy Chatfield, includes a wide variety of information on the activities, accomplishments, challenges, and work of Cesar Chavez and the farmworkers who participated in the farmworker movement.

“In a world that has become increasingly digital, it makes perfect sense for libraries to acquire born-digital archives, especially when excellent opportunities like this present themselves,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “Given the strengths of our collections in terms of California and Baja California history, the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive is an outstanding addition to our holdings. LeRoy Chatfield has done a tremendous amount of important work in building this expansive website, and now, as part of the Library’s collection, it will be preserved and made broadly accessible to future generations of scholars and students.”

The Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive, which can now be accessed on the Library’s website, comprises thousands of items documenting the United Farmworkers’ (UFW) history and related events, including a timeline of significant milestones, oral histories, and manuscripts, as well as essays, and poetry penned by volunteers. Also included are 13,000 photographs, videos—including a short video on the farmworker union (NFWA/UFW) historic march to Sacramento in 1966—and a variety of art and images of cultural artifacts such as stamps, posters, paintings, and illustrations.

From 1962 to 1993, Cesar Chavez, founding president of the UFW, dedicated himself to organizing a farmworker movement in Central California. Although Chavez is renowned as an historic labor leader, Chatfield, a longtime Christian Brother and humanitarian who worked with Chavez from 1963 to 1973, said his vision began with, but stretched beyond the workers in the fields.

“Cesar Chavez’s vision for the farmworker movement encompassed far more than organizing a union,” said Chatfield. “His status as a revered icon has less to do with his union activities than with the personal sacrifices, commitment to nonviolence, and deep religious conviction that marked his life of service to impoverished farmworkers. I’m very pleased that his story—and the many stories of those involved in the farmworker movement—will now be maintained as part of the UC San Diego Library’s collections.”

Chatfield first met Chavez in 1963, and the two became close friends, bonding over their mutual commitment to and compassion for the farmworkers who labored in the Delano, California fields, picking grapes and other produce. Chavez asked Chatfield to work for him when the Delano Grape Strike began in 1965, and he continued to serve under his leadership until 1973, when he relocated to Sacramento.

Although Chavez’s death in 1993 brought an end to the farmworker movement, it reunited Chatfield with dozens of former UFW colleagues and brought back “floods of fond memories,” he recalled, “regarding my association with Cesar Chavez and his movement.” In 1994, Chatfield published a “private memoir” recounting his experiences with Chavez,Cesar 1968, now part of the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive site. After he retired as executive director of Sacramento Loaves & Fishes in 2000, Chatfield became inspired to document the farmworker movement, after reading a New York Times article lamenting the fact that the history of much of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s had gone undocumented, with many stories lost to the dustbin of history.

“Thousands of people were actively involved in the Civil Rights Movement but barely a fraction of their stories were told,” said Chatfield. “Because so much time had passed, their stories would never be told and preserved for future generations. This fact made me realize that I too had been immersed in a similar movement, and I knew at least 50 others like myself who had been involved. I realized I was well positioned to document Cesar Chavez’s farmworker movement and began to feel obligated to do so.”

“The Farmworker Movement Documentation Project is a labor of love and commitment accomplished by one man—LeRoy Chatfield,” said Literature Professor Jorge Mariscal, director of UC San Diego’s Chicano/a~Latino/a Arts & Humanities program. “But like the farmworker movement itself, one man stands in for the hundreds of dedicated contributors whose words and images live on in the archive. This will be a major research and educational tool for generations to come. Brian Schottlaender and the UC San Diego Library deserve high praise for acquiring this one-of-a-kind treasure trove of California history.”

What started as the Farmworker Movement Documentation Project in book form, morphed into an online presence in 2004, when Chatfield was introduced to a young woman, Jennifer Szabo, who possessed the requisite web skills needed to organize and present all the materials Chatfield was collecting in a digital format.

“I had amassed a large amount of farmworker movement primary source documents and materials,” said Chatfield. “Moving this project to the Internet enabled us to include oral histories, videos, photographs, artwork, cartoons, and buttons—a veritable multimedia presentation of the farmworker movement, an historical documentation of a 31-year social movement and the largest website of its kind.”

Media Contact

Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667,ddavies@ucsd.edu

Unveiling of Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive

UC San Diego Press Release

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Got data:? Announcing the Beta launch of openICPSR – ICPSR’s Public Access Data Collection

ICPSR recently announced that openICPSR has launched in its Beta form for use by member institutions. The service is found at: www.openicpsr.org

openICPSR is a research data-sharing service for the social and behavioral sciences. Because depositors pay to deposit research data and documentation, the service allows the public to access research data at no charge. openICPSR assists researchers in meeting requirements for public access to federally funded research data. It ensures that data depositors fulfill public-access requirements of grant and contract RFPs.

openICPSR will run in beta form through June 2014. During the beta period, researchers at member institutions are welcome to self-deposit data and documentation free of charge. Beginning in July 2014, the service will open to the public and the fee for self-deposits will be $600 US per project.

Please contact Annelise Sklar for the members-only promotion code.

Please note that professional curation deposits are not included in the openICPSR free offer. Researchers desiring professional curation with public access should contact ICPSR for a quote at deposit@icpsr.umich.edu or 734-647-2200.

openICPSR will continue to add functionality over the course of the next several months; however, self-deposits, when published, will indeed be available to the public, assigned a DOI, and cataloged. (One exception is the deposit of restricted-use data. These data will be accepted, assigned a DOI, and cataloged; however, restricted-use data will not be distributed until later in the year and then via our virtual data enclave (VDE) with a nominal charge to the data requester.)

Downloading PDFs from HathiTrust

The HathiTrust Digital Library contains over 4.7 million titles, many of which are full text viewable and downloadable volumes. For UC-affiliated users who login, 3.6 million fully viewable books and journal volumes published pre-1923, as well as later public domain books, are available. Some volumes in the HathiTrust Digital Library are only available to search, but are not available as full text or for download.

To download PDFs from HathiTrust:

  1. Go to www.hathitrust.org.
  2. Click Login in the upper right. Select University of California, San Diego and click Continue.
  3. Choose Active Directory, then enter your username and password. You will be redirected to HathiTrust.
  4. Search the collection, with the Full text only box checked.
  5. Select the full view link next to the item in the search results.
  6. From the record view, select Download whole book (PDF) from the left column.
    1. If you did not login earlier, you will be prompted to do so at this point.
  7. Once your PDF is built, you can download it.
    1. At this time, you can only download the entire book or journal volume, rather than a single chapter or article. However, you can use Adobe Acrobat Pro or another PDF editor to delete the pages you don’t want.

Public Beta Launch: UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections Website

We are excited to announce the public beta launch of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website.

The Digital Collections website contains more than 65,000 digital items that include documents, photographs, audio, video, and data sets that are unique to the UC San Diego Library.                          DAMS4

Unique Digital Collections include the Baja California Collection, the Dr. Seuss Collection, the Missions of Alta California, the Spanish Civil War Collection, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology, and UC San Diego History.

The Digital Collections also contain more than 6,000 digital objects of research data gathered by campus researchers as part of UC San Diego’s The Research Cyberinfrastructure Program.

We are in a test phase before replacing our current site: https://libraries.ucsd.edu/digital/ Help us by being a beta tester. We encourage you to use the “Help” menu of the site to report bugs or to submit any suggestions for improvement.

The new Digital Collections website incorporates responsive web design so you can browse the site on all your devices. Browse and discover the unique collections contained in our Digital Collections website at: Browse by Collection.

And, bookmark the UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website at:  http://library.ucsd.edu/dc

 

Materials Documenting the Birth of the Nuclear Age to Be Digitized

The papers of Leo Szilard, one of the nation’s most influential scientists, will soon be digitized by the University of California, San Diego Library, thanks to a $93,000 grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).                                                                             LeoSzilard_Einstein

The Library’s Leo Szilard materials, which extend from 1938 to 1998, chronicle the birth of the nuclear age, the work of the Manhattan Project—which Szilard helped to create—and the beginnings of the study of molecular biology. While the physicist and inventor played an essential role in the development of the atomic bomb, he was a passionate advocate for global arms control and argued for using the bomb as a deterrent, not as a force for destruction.

More than 50,000 items will be digitized, including some 550 photographs, as well as several hours of video and audio recordings. The papers include correspondence with numerous fellow scientists with whom Szilard collaborated, including Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, Jonas Salk, Edward Teller, and Linus Pauling. Also included are a variety of biographical materials, such as immigration papers and passports—Szilard was born in Budapest, emigrating to the U.S. in 1938– and biographical articles and sketches.

For more information, visit http://libraries.ucsd.edu/news/releases/2014/szilard.html

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