ChemBioOffice 14 and SciFinder

The campus-wide site license for ChemBioOffice/ChemDraw is funded by ACMS and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and administered by ACMS. Questions about the license or registration codes should be directed to software@ucsd.edu. For questions about SciFinder, contact Teri Vogel.

UCSD faculty, staff and students can now download the new ChemBioOffice 14. Among the enhancements, you can send your ChemDraw structure and reaction queries directly to SciFinder without having to copy/paste or import into the SciFinder structure editor. Instructions and technical information after the jump.

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Natural Standard Database Access Restored

Access to the Natural Standard database on integrative medicine was not available for UCSD users in April and much of May due to licensing and renewal problems. CDL/UCSF licensing efforts have concluded and we now have access again. Thank you for your patience. The new site is https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

Additional resources for natural product medicine include the following:

Reaxys Update

This week, Elsevier released an updated Reaxys interface with some new search features. Reaxys is one of the core databases to search chemical literature, particularly reactions and substance property data.

The new features:

  • An Ask Reaxys Toolbar that allows you to run topic searches that you would normally start from the Reactions or Substances menu, like “synthesis of taxol,” “preparation of Ni(PPh3)2Cl2,” “19F nmr of fluorobenzene,” “melting of steel,” or “crystal structure of MgSO4.”
  • A Molecular Formula query builder where you can select atoms (plus counts, charges, and ranges) as well as groups and series.
  • With the Alloy search, you can search for alloys, glasses and ceramic materials by the percentages, which can be expressed by weight, atom or volume.
  • The Reaxys Tree offers an alternative way to search the entries and properties. You can browse through the various groupings (chemical transformations, physico chemical properties, etc.) or search across the tree for an entry or property (calorimetry, Wittig reaction, modulus) and run a literature search on the selected results.

There is one content change. For literature references, from mid-2013 going forward, bioactivity data (including pharmacological data as well as toxicological data related to biological specimens) will no longer be visible in Reaxys. You will still see literature citations, but instead of data or other information about the bioactivity, there will be a comment like “physiological behaviour discussed.” The legacy bioactivity data will still be visible.

Digital Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive Acquired

A rich digital archive documenting the UFW Farmworkers’ Movement in Central California from 1962 to 1993 has been acquired by the University of California, San Diego Library. The archive, which was developed by LeRoy Chatfield, includes a wide variety of information on the activities, accomplishments, challenges, and work of Cesar Chavez and the farmworkers who participated in the farmworker movement.

“In a world that has become increasingly digital, it makes perfect sense for libraries to acquire born-digital archives, especially when excellent opportunities like this present themselves,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “Given the strengths of our collections in terms of California and Baja California history, the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive is an outstanding addition to our holdings. LeRoy Chatfield has done a tremendous amount of important work in building this expansive website, and now, as part of the Library’s collection, it will be preserved and made broadly accessible to future generations of scholars and students.”

The Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive, which can now be accessed on the Library’s website, comprises thousands of items documenting the United Farmworkers’ (UFW) history and related events, including a timeline of significant milestones, oral histories, and manuscripts, as well as essays, and poetry penned by volunteers. Also included are 13,000 photographs, videos—including a short video on the farmworker union (NFWA/UFW) historic march to Sacramento in 1966—and a variety of art and images of cultural artifacts such as stamps, posters, paintings, and illustrations.

From 1962 to 1993, Cesar Chavez, founding president of the UFW, dedicated himself to organizing a farmworker movement in Central California. Although Chavez is renowned as an historic labor leader, Chatfield, a longtime Christian Brother and humanitarian who worked with Chavez from 1963 to 1973, said his vision began with, but stretched beyond the workers in the fields.

“Cesar Chavez’s vision for the farmworker movement encompassed far more than organizing a union,” said Chatfield. “His status as a revered icon has less to do with his union activities than with the personal sacrifices, commitment to nonviolence, and deep religious conviction that marked his life of service to impoverished farmworkers. I’m very pleased that his story—and the many stories of those involved in the farmworker movement—will now be maintained as part of the UC San Diego Library’s collections.”

Chatfield first met Chavez in 1963, and the two became close friends, bonding over their mutual commitment to and compassion for the farmworkers who labored in the Delano, California fields, picking grapes and other produce. Chavez asked Chatfield to work for him when the Delano Grape Strike began in 1965, and he continued to serve under his leadership until 1973, when he relocated to Sacramento.

Although Chavez’s death in 1993 brought an end to the farmworker movement, it reunited Chatfield with dozens of former UFW colleagues and brought back “floods of fond memories,” he recalled, “regarding my association with Cesar Chavez and his movement.” In 1994, Chatfield published a “private memoir” recounting his experiences with Chavez,Cesar 1968, now part of the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive site. After he retired as executive director of Sacramento Loaves & Fishes in 2000, Chatfield became inspired to document the farmworker movement, after reading a New York Times article lamenting the fact that the history of much of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s had gone undocumented, with many stories lost to the dustbin of history.

“Thousands of people were actively involved in the Civil Rights Movement but barely a fraction of their stories were told,” said Chatfield. “Because so much time had passed, their stories would never be told and preserved for future generations. This fact made me realize that I too had been immersed in a similar movement, and I knew at least 50 others like myself who had been involved. I realized I was well positioned to document Cesar Chavez’s farmworker movement and began to feel obligated to do so.”

“The Farmworker Movement Documentation Project is a labor of love and commitment accomplished by one man—LeRoy Chatfield,” said Literature Professor Jorge Mariscal, director of UC San Diego’s Chicano/a~Latino/a Arts & Humanities program. “But like the farmworker movement itself, one man stands in for the hundreds of dedicated contributors whose words and images live on in the archive. This will be a major research and educational tool for generations to come. Brian Schottlaender and the UC San Diego Library deserve high praise for acquiring this one-of-a-kind treasure trove of California history.”

What started as the Farmworker Movement Documentation Project in book form, morphed into an online presence in 2004, when Chatfield was introduced to a young woman, Jennifer Szabo, who possessed the requisite web skills needed to organize and present all the materials Chatfield was collecting in a digital format.

“I had amassed a large amount of farmworker movement primary source documents and materials,” said Chatfield. “Moving this project to the Internet enabled us to include oral histories, videos, photographs, artwork, cartoons, and buttons—a veritable multimedia presentation of the farmworker movement, an historical documentation of a 31-year social movement and the largest website of its kind.”

Media Contact

Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667,ddavies@ucsd.edu

Unveiling of Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive

UC San Diego Press Release

FarmworkersArchive_flyerFINAL

Got data:? Announcing the Beta launch of openICPSR – ICPSR’s Public Access Data Collection

ICPSR recently announced that openICPSR has launched in its Beta form for use by member institutions. The service is found at: www.openicpsr.org

openICPSR is a research data-sharing service for the social and behavioral sciences. Because depositors pay to deposit research data and documentation, the service allows the public to access research data at no charge. openICPSR assists researchers in meeting requirements for public access to federally funded research data. It ensures that data depositors fulfill public-access requirements of grant and contract RFPs.

openICPSR will run in beta form through June 2014. During the beta period, researchers at member institutions are welcome to self-deposit data and documentation free of charge. Beginning in July 2014, the service will open to the public and the fee for self-deposits will be $600 US per project.

Please contact Annelise Sklar for the members-only promotion code.

Please note that professional curation deposits are not included in the openICPSR free offer. Researchers desiring professional curation with public access should contact ICPSR for a quote at deposit@icpsr.umich.edu or 734-647-2200.

openICPSR will continue to add functionality over the course of the next several months; however, self-deposits, when published, will indeed be available to the public, assigned a DOI, and cataloged. (One exception is the deposit of restricted-use data. These data will be accepted, assigned a DOI, and cataloged; however, restricted-use data will not be distributed until later in the year and then via our virtual data enclave (VDE) with a nominal charge to the data requester.)

Cambridge Structural Database 2014

The 2014 Cambridge Structural Database System (CSDS) is now available for download and installation. Access is limited to UCSD faculty, students and staff.

  • Uninstall the 2013 version first.
  • The suite includes ConQuest 1.16, Mercury CSD 3.3, PC Vista, PreQuest, Mogul 1.6, IsoStar 2.2.1 PC Client and all database files. You can (depending on your operating system) also download optional programs, including DASH.
  • Download times will vary, as these are very large files. The ISO installation will require a DVD.
  • You will need the site and registration codes the first time you run CSDS on your computer. These codes are available on that download page.
  • There is also a “lighter” web version available, WebCSD.
  • Documentation
  • Important information for OSX users:

If you have any problems downloading or installing CSDS, please contact Teri Vogel about alternative installation options.

Scopus Workshop, 3/12

Please join us for a workshop to learn how Scopus, a citation/abstract database of 50+ million records, with additional tools to track, analyze and visualize research. It’s strongest journal coverage is in science and engineering, but it also indexes social science, arts, and humanities journals.

Wednesday, March 12, 1-2pm, Geisel Library, Room 274
Registration link here, and seating is limited
Faculty, students, staff welcome

At the workshop you’ll learn how to use Scopus to:

  • Find the latest research in your field
  • Find other researchers doing work like yours
  • Find the best journal to submit your work
  • Find out who is citing your work

This workshop will also cover how to use Scopus to track, analyze and visualize research, how Scopus uses ORCID to solve the name ambiguity problem in research and scholarly communications, and how to use Mendeley as a reference manager to make the process of writing papers more efficient.

The UC Libraries have trial access to Scopus for 2014. Your feedback is essential in helping us determine if we can and should continue access beyond this year. We encourage you to try Scopus and send us your feedback.

ChemDraw @ UCSD (+ ChemDraw for iPad)

Just a reminder that UC San Diego faculty, staff and students have access to ChemBioDraw (aka ChemDraw). This is a campus-wide license, funded by a joint contribution from ACMS and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

The Windows version includes ChemBioDraw as part of the larger ChemBioOffice Ultra suite (complete list of programs here). ChemBioDraw is available for Mac users. PerkinElmer offers a rich collection of training webinars, shorter video clips, and support resources.

To get ChemBioOffice/ChemBioDraw:

  • Register with PerkinElmer (formerly CambridgeSoft), using your ucsd.edu email address.
  • Once ACMS confirms your status, they will email you the instructions to download and activate the software. Please contact ACMS (software@ucsd.edu) if you have any questions. Note: the Library does not manage the registrations or downloads.

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SciFinder and Structure Editor Problems Java 7u51

Users may experience problems with the Java editor loading in SciFinder with the release of Java 7 Update 51 (1.7.0_51). Chemical Abstracts Service recommends that you add https://scifinder.cas.org to the Exception Site List, which you can find at the Java Control Panel.  This is a new feature in Update 51 and isn’t available in the earlier updates.

More about the structure editor technical requirements (and non-Java alternatives).

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