February Workshops – PubMed, Refworks, and Patents

The Library’s Febrary workshops (complete list for Winter 2015)

PubMed Essentials
Feb 4 (Wed), 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Biomed Lib Bldg, Classroom 3
Register

This hands-on workshop focuses on what every user needs to know about PubMed, whether doing a search for a specific author or topic using keywords. Learn to focus your results with limits, become familiar with the features of the advanced search screen, and know how to use UC E-Links to easily get to full text articles.

PubMed: Beyond the Essentials
Feb 18 (Wed), 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Biomed Lib Bldg, Classroom 3
Register

Move beyond the basics to refine and expand your searching skills. Learn about MeSH terms and how to use them in a search. Use MyNCBI and its numerous tools to keep you updated and to customize PubMed for your most frequent types of searches. Great for the frequent searcher.

Patents & Patent Searching
Feb. 12, 2015 (Tues), 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Geisel Lib Classroom 1
Register

Patents are critically important in protecting intellectual property and companies are investing fortunes in them to safeguard their inventions. It is estimated that between 2010 and 2012 in the smartphone industry alone, over $20 billion was spent on patent purchases and litigation. Without the protection afforded by patent coverage, technological innovation would dry up.

In this class, you will learn how patents protect your intellectual property and what rights they confer, what to expect in the patent application process, how to read and interpret patent documents, and why international patents matter. Learn how you can work with the UCSD Technology Transfer Office to manage and protect your inventions. Finally, learn about free web search engines you can use to discover if your invention has already been patented. Even if you don’t have an invention on the drawing board, this class will give you valuable insight into how patents work.

Refworks
Feb 18 (Wed), 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Geisel Lib Bldg Classroom 3
Register

Learn how to organize your references and instantly format your research papers, articles, and other publications using APA, NLM and hundreds of other writing styles. You’ll also learn how to download references using your favorite research databases and library catalogs. Collaborate with other authors via the RefShare tool.

New UCSD Database – MarinLit (Marine Natural Products)

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The UCSD Library recently licensed the MarinLit Database. Once available only to individuals through the University of Canterbury, it was acquired in late 2013 by the Royal Society of Chemistry and now offered to campuses with a site license.

MarinLit is a text and structural searchable database of the marine natural product literature, with some unique search features and dereplication tools that are not available in our other chemical information resources. This database will be useful to anyone researching marine natural products at SIO, SSPPS, and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. There are numerous ways to search the database, including:

  • Bibliographic Information: article title and citation, author, trivial name
  • Taxonomy
  • Location
  • Compound (for dereplication of newly isolated compounds): name, structure, molecular formula, mass, UV maxima, functional groups, NMR predicted shifts

If you have questions about using MarinLit, please contact Amy Butros (abutros@ucsd.edu) or Teri Vogel (tmvogel@ucsd.edu).

Library Workshops in January – EndNote and SciFinder

The Library’s January workshops (complete list for Winter 2015)

EndNote

Jan 20 (Tues), 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Geisel Lib Bldg Classroom 1
Register

Writing a research paper and need to manage your references? Using EndNote already, but want to learn about its “power” features (e.g., Connect, “Cite While You Write,” etc.)? Take this workshop to learn to build your own EndNote reference library and work with Word to write your paper and seamlessly create bibliographies. Attendees from all departments are welcome.

Special EndNote instructor, Doug Nguyen, from Thomson-Reuters will be teaching the session.

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SciFinder Essentials for Chemists and Non-Chemists

Jan 29 (Thurs), 10:00 – 11:30 am
Biomed Lib Bldg Classroom 3
Register

SciFinder is one of the core information resources for exploring the chemical literature, but it’s not just for chemists. It can also be helpful to researchers in engineering, environmental sciences, physics, and radiology and other health sciences.

This hands-on workshop will cover the SciFinder essentials: topic and author searching, improving your search results, accessing the full text articles, and how SciFinder compares with other databases like Web of Science. You’ll also learn to search CAS Registry to find chemical substance information, and get an introduction to the built-in editor for drawing chemical structures and reactions.

Cambridge Structural Database 2015

The 2015 Cambridge Structural Database System (CSDS) is available for UCSD faculty, staff, and students to download and install. The regular UC distribution site at UCLA will be updated with the 2015 CSDS shortly, but until then you can access the files directly from the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC).

  • Go to the CCDC download page.
  • Enter your email address and the UCSD site and confirmation codes, which you can find here. If off campus, you’ll need VPN or proxy to reach this page.
  • You will receive an email from CCDC with the links to download CSDS (Windows, OSX, Linux), along with additional Windows and/or Linux programs: DASH, IsoStar, SuperStar, and GoldSuite. It usually takes a few hours for the files to download, and these links are good for 24 hours.

Once you have the CSDS file, you can install the programs. It is recommended that you uninstall CSDS 2014 first. The first time you run CSDS, you will be prompted to register with the site and confirmation codes.

The Cambridge Structural Database is a repository of more than 700,000 organic and organometallic crystal structures, searchable by chemical name, molecular formula, elements, experimental details, and literature reference information like author. If you have questions about CSDS, please contact Teri Vogel.

UC Libraries Become Hub for Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) DPLA 2brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world online. An online library into the United States’ historical and cultural heritage, DPLA aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more.

The UC Libraries have recently joined the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as a Content Hub. In our role as a DPLA Content Hub, the California Digital Library will be sharing metadata records from Calisphere, a website containing approximately 250,000 digital primary source objects contributed by libraries, archives, and museums across the state of California– including unique content from across the UC Libraries. Because of the increased exposure, the UC Libraries’ digital resources will have a broader, nationwide audience that will be able to find and discover unique collections maintained across the UC Libraries.

Browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, physical location via a map, a virtual bookshelf, and faceted search. You can also save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. Never has our cultural heritage been so easy to explore!

ChemBioOffice 14 and SciFinder

The campus-wide site license for ChemBioOffice/ChemDraw is funded by ACMS and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and administered by ACMS. Questions about the license or registration codes should be directed to software@ucsd.edu. For questions about SciFinder, contact Teri Vogel.

UCSD faculty, staff and students can now download the new ChemBioOffice 14. Among the enhancements, you can send your ChemDraw structure and reaction queries directly to SciFinder without having to copy/paste or import into the SciFinder structure editor. Instructions and technical information after the jump.

Read more…

Natural Standard Database Access Restored

Access to the Natural Standard database on integrative medicine was not available for UCSD users in April and much of May due to licensing and renewal problems. CDL/UCSF licensing efforts have concluded and we now have access again. Thank you for your patience. The new site is https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

Additional resources for natural product medicine include the following:

Reaxys Update

This week, Elsevier released an updated Reaxys interface with some new search features. Reaxys is one of the core databases to search chemical literature, particularly reactions and substance property data.

The new features:

  • An Ask Reaxys Toolbar that allows you to run topic searches that you would normally start from the Reactions or Substances menu, like “synthesis of taxol,” “preparation of Ni(PPh3)2Cl2,” “19F nmr of fluorobenzene,” “melting of steel,” or “crystal structure of MgSO4.”
  • A Molecular Formula query builder where you can select atoms (plus counts, charges, and ranges) as well as groups and series.
  • With the Alloy search, you can search for alloys, glasses and ceramic materials by the percentages, which can be expressed by weight, atom or volume.
  • The Reaxys Tree offers an alternative way to search the entries and properties. You can browse through the various groupings (chemical transformations, physico chemical properties, etc.) or search across the tree for an entry or property (calorimetry, Wittig reaction, modulus) and run a literature search on the selected results.

There is one content change. For literature references, from mid-2013 going forward, bioactivity data (including pharmacological data as well as toxicological data related to biological specimens) will no longer be visible in Reaxys. You will still see literature citations, but instead of data or other information about the bioactivity, there will be a comment like “physiological behaviour discussed.” The legacy bioactivity data will still be visible.

Digital Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive Acquired

A rich digital archive documenting the UFW Farmworkers’ Movement in Central California from 1962 to 1993 has been acquired by the University of California, San Diego Library. The archive, which was developed by LeRoy Chatfield, includes a wide variety of information on the activities, accomplishments, challenges, and work of Cesar Chavez and the farmworkers who participated in the farmworker movement.

“In a world that has become increasingly digital, it makes perfect sense for libraries to acquire born-digital archives, especially when excellent opportunities like this present themselves,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “Given the strengths of our collections in terms of California and Baja California history, the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive is an outstanding addition to our holdings. LeRoy Chatfield has done a tremendous amount of important work in building this expansive website, and now, as part of the Library’s collection, it will be preserved and made broadly accessible to future generations of scholars and students.”

The Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive, which can now be accessed on the Library’s website, comprises thousands of items documenting the United Farmworkers’ (UFW) history and related events, including a timeline of significant milestones, oral histories, and manuscripts, as well as essays, and poetry penned by volunteers. Also included are 13,000 photographs, videos—including a short video on the farmworker union (NFWA/UFW) historic march to Sacramento in 1966—and a variety of art and images of cultural artifacts such as stamps, posters, paintings, and illustrations.

From 1962 to 1993, Cesar Chavez, founding president of the UFW, dedicated himself to organizing a farmworker movement in Central California. Although Chavez is renowned as an historic labor leader, Chatfield, a longtime Christian Brother and humanitarian who worked with Chavez from 1963 to 1973, said his vision began with, but stretched beyond the workers in the fields.

“Cesar Chavez’s vision for the farmworker movement encompassed far more than organizing a union,” said Chatfield. “His status as a revered icon has less to do with his union activities than with the personal sacrifices, commitment to nonviolence, and deep religious conviction that marked his life of service to impoverished farmworkers. I’m very pleased that his story—and the many stories of those involved in the farmworker movement—will now be maintained as part of the UC San Diego Library’s collections.”

Chatfield first met Chavez in 1963, and the two became close friends, bonding over their mutual commitment to and compassion for the farmworkers who labored in the Delano, California fields, picking grapes and other produce. Chavez asked Chatfield to work for him when the Delano Grape Strike began in 1965, and he continued to serve under his leadership until 1973, when he relocated to Sacramento.

Although Chavez’s death in 1993 brought an end to the farmworker movement, it reunited Chatfield with dozens of former UFW colleagues and brought back “floods of fond memories,” he recalled, “regarding my association with Cesar Chavez and his movement.” In 1994, Chatfield published a “private memoir” recounting his experiences with Chavez,Cesar 1968, now part of the Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive site. After he retired as executive director of Sacramento Loaves & Fishes in 2000, Chatfield became inspired to document the farmworker movement, after reading a New York Times article lamenting the fact that the history of much of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s had gone undocumented, with many stories lost to the dustbin of history.

“Thousands of people were actively involved in the Civil Rights Movement but barely a fraction of their stories were told,” said Chatfield. “Because so much time had passed, their stories would never be told and preserved for future generations. This fact made me realize that I too had been immersed in a similar movement, and I knew at least 50 others like myself who had been involved. I realized I was well positioned to document Cesar Chavez’s farmworker movement and began to feel obligated to do so.”

“The Farmworker Movement Documentation Project is a labor of love and commitment accomplished by one man—LeRoy Chatfield,” said Literature Professor Jorge Mariscal, director of UC San Diego’s Chicano/a~Latino/a Arts & Humanities program. “But like the farmworker movement itself, one man stands in for the hundreds of dedicated contributors whose words and images live on in the archive. This will be a major research and educational tool for generations to come. Brian Schottlaender and the UC San Diego Library deserve high praise for acquiring this one-of-a-kind treasure trove of California history.”

What started as the Farmworker Movement Documentation Project in book form, morphed into an online presence in 2004, when Chatfield was introduced to a young woman, Jennifer Szabo, who possessed the requisite web skills needed to organize and present all the materials Chatfield was collecting in a digital format.

“I had amassed a large amount of farmworker movement primary source documents and materials,” said Chatfield. “Moving this project to the Internet enabled us to include oral histories, videos, photographs, artwork, cartoons, and buttons—a veritable multimedia presentation of the farmworker movement, an historical documentation of a 31-year social movement and the largest website of its kind.”

Media Contact

Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667,ddavies@ucsd.edu

Unveiling of Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive

UC San Diego Press Release

FarmworkersArchive_flyerFINAL

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