DML Uses SketchFab to Create 360 Degree Photos

SketchDigital cameras are used to capture images in full stereo surround for use in virtual reality systems. These images can cover any field of view, including 360° by 180° spherical panoramas. Two photographic cylinders are created with identical dimensions, capturing the perspective as seen from each eye position. When these cylinders are mapped to a spherical surface, full stereo in all directions is achieved. This technique allows photographic imaging to create the virtual environment itself. The complete stereo image that is created by this technique can be viewed in any direction that is supported by the virtual reality system design.fab allows us to embed 360 photo viewers in browser now. All we have to do is make a sphere, apply the panorama as a texture, and move the camera inside of it. These photos come from the CaveCam collection now hosted on the Geisel Library Digital Collections site.

This imaging technique complements existing technologies such as LiDAR or SfM providing more detailed textural information that can be used in conjunction for analysis and visualization. The advantages of this digital imaging technique for cultural heritage can be seen in its non-invasive and rapid capture of heritage sites for documentation, analysis and immersive visualization. The technique is applied to several significant heritage sites in Luxor, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

Sketchfab now allows for embedded 360 photo viewers in browsers. These photos come from the CaveCam collection now hosted on the Geisel Library Digital Collections site (CaveCam Collection, UC San Diego Library).

Colorful Propaganda Posters Offer a Glimpse into North Korean Life

North Korea, a closed nation that was created during a tumultuous time post World War II and the Korean Civil War of the early 1950s, has been in the news a lot lately. Primary source materials, including evidence, artifacts or other items created within the boundaries of North Korea, are hard to find. Very little information is allowed to flow over the country’s two borders with South Korea and China. The UC San Diego Library has one window available into this corner of the world, a collection of 66 North Korean propaganda posters. The original posters are held in the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, and digital copies are available through the Library’s Digital Collections website.  

The posters are high-quality hand painted reproductions of printed posters that exclaim slogans and sayings to bolster the morale of the North Korean populace. From protecting the Supreme Commander to reuniting the Asian continent the posters are a way to guide the thoughts and actions of the North Korean people and make them proud of the actions of their government. They use bright colors to attract the eye and most are large in size to overwhelm and consume the viewer. The posters, with catchy slogans and cartoon-like images attempt to persuade the North Korean people to work hard, be loyal to the government and be proud of their heritage.

This collection of posters, created between 1985 and 2002, is unique in Calisphere and Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). These two online treasure troves collect images from a wide variety of organizations, including UC San Diego. Calisphere collects digital material from educational and cultural heritage institutions throughout California, while DPLA has a broader scope that includes all fifty states and institutions like Harvard University, ARTstor and Library of Congress. While other institutions may have collections of North Korean propaganda posters in their physical collections, UC San Diego Library is unique in making these resources accessible through these two popular online portals.

UC San Diego Library Wraps Up Holocaust Living History Workshop Lecture Series May 30



Join us for the last installment of the 2017-2018 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) with Eva Clarke on Wednesday, May 30 from 5-7 p.m. in the Seuss Room. This event is free and open to the public.

Eva Clarke

What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Clarke was one of three “miracle babies” who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva’s chances of survival were extremely slim. Against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK and settled in Cardiff. Nowadays, Eva regularly talks to audiences, and her remarkable story has been featured in the British and American media. She and her mother are among the protagonists of Wendy Holden’s book “Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance, and Hope.”

Every year the popular HLHW invites high-caliber speakers to campus to share inspiring stories that broaden our understanding of the past, foster tolerance and preserve the memories of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. This year we heard from individuals such as international lawyer Philippe Sands and POLIN Museum’s curator Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.

If you missed the opportunity to attend a workshop, you can watch recordings of selected talks for research through the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections and UCTV.

China Through the Lens of Friendship Delegations in the 1970s

A dialog and reception to launch the digital collection of photographs taken by the Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars (CCAS) Friendship Delegations

 

The UC San Diego Library is pleased to launch a new digital collection of images of early 1970s China contributed by members of the Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars (CCAS) Friendship Delegations.

You are cordially invited to a dialog and reception with CCAS delegates and contributors to the collection on Thursday, January 18, 2018 from 4-6pm in Geisel’s Seuss Room. RSVP here.

The event features Paul Pickowicz, distinguished professor of history and Chinese studies at UC San Diego, and William Joseph, professor of political science at Wellesley College, sharing their experiences while traveling in mainland China followed by a Q&A session with the audience. Light refreshments will be served.  Read more…

Paul Blackburn Audio Collection Now Online

The UC San Diego Library is pleased to announce the launch of our latest digital collection, the Paul Blackburn Audio Collection. These digitized recordings feature poetry readings, lectures, conversations, and correspondence recorded on reel-to-reel tape by Paul Blackburn from 1960 to 1971 in New York City.

Paul Blackburn portrait

Blackburn was a cornerstone of the New York Poetry scene – In addition to writing his own poetry and translating such writers as Octavio Paz and Julio Cortázar, Blackburn played an important role in organizing and attending poetry readings throughout New York City and hosted his own poetry radio show, Contemporary Poetry on WBAI in New York.  These events provided opportunities for both established and unknown writers to participate in the New York poetry community. He recorded these readings, lectures, conversations about poetry with friends, as well as radio and news broadcasts.

The editor of Blackburn’s posthumously published Collected Poems (1985), Edith Jarolim, has called this collection “the most comprehensive oral history of the New York poetry scene between the late 1950s and 1970.” An example of its rarities is the only known recording of an interview by the poet Mina Loy. Among others, the collection includes recordings of

The first release of this collection includes over 100 recordings featuring over 100 poets, now available for streaming. Subsequent releases will bring the total number of recordings to over 200 available for online streaming and about 50 descriptions of recordings that can be made available onsite at UC San Diego Library’s Special Collections & Archives.  We anticipate having the entire digital collection complete by February 2018.  Read more…

Results of Digital Collections 2017 Summer Survey

The Digital Library Development Program, working with the Library’s Digital User Services, conducted a 3-question quick poll on the Digital Collections site, July 7-17, 2017 in order to gain insight into who was using our digital collections and for what purpose.  Getting data on digital content has never been easier with Google Analytics (GA) – We can quickly gather statistics on page hits or duration of a visit, and even how users found our content.  However, we have found that GA only provides one side of the story and we were hoping to find out more about our users.  Who are the users of Digital Collections and how are they using our content?  Is it an undergraduate student looking for primary source materials for a paper?  A post-doc doing research in a lab?  Is it a genealogist in Pennsylvania looking to find out more about her family?  Knowing who is using the collections and how will help the Digital Library Development Program in making decisions regarding the design, what type of information to display, and even what type of content to pursue for our collections.

So what story do the results of this survey tell us?  Read more…

UC San Diego’s 1961-2011 General Catalogs Available in the Library’s Digital Collections

The UC San Diego Library is proud to announce the online availability of UC San Diego’s General Catalogs. The catalogs include degree requirements and descriptions for colleges, departments, and schools offered by UC San Diego, with course descriptions for each course. Catalogs were produced and distributed by the Campus Registrar each year. Historically the Library would then microfilm these paper catalogs as they were received to preserve and make them accessible to users in the Library. Alumni seeking to verify enrollment for transfer credit at grad school needed to visit the Library and search the microfilm for each year to find course descriptions, making grainy printouts to submit for verification. For alumni outside of San Diego this meant a special trip to San Diego or requesting copies through their local library or the UC San Diego Library Ask A Librarian service. Now online, these catalogs can be accessed from any computer with an internet connection and are full-text searchable – no more special trips to the Library or fighting with the microform printer!

Each catalog is available in its entirety as a PDF that can be downloaded to the user’s computer. Catalogs include not only course descriptions but Program and Certificate descriptions, faculty lists, and pertinent campus information including photos and maps of campus. Student and faculty profiles also offer a glimpse of campus life. Below is a short list of “notable”s found in the General Catalogs.

  • 1973-1974 General CatalogIn 1970-1971, we predicted:”The San Diego campus is expected to reach maximum growth by 1995, with a student enrollment of 27,500. By that time twelve interrelated colleges, grouped in clusters of three or four  colleges each, will have been established” (pdf page 13).
  • In 1978-1979, we declared: Most Sports-Minded Campus: UC San Diego Physical Education Department Chairman Dr. Howard Hunt calls this campus “the most sports-minded in America.” And Dr. Hunt has the statistics to prove it. UC San Diego fields more intercollegiate athletic teams – thirty- than any other college or university in the nation. This total is all the more remarkable in light of the fact that UC San Diego has no big-time football team and that the student body voted four-to-one against allowing any athletic scholarships (pdf page 13).
  • Most of the catalogs include faculty and student profiles. You’ll find important campus figures like Faith Ringgold, professor of Visual Arts in 1996-1997 (pdf page 170).

Although we currently only have PDF versions of catalogs through 2011, more recent catalogs are available online through the Registrar’s Office website. We hope that the addition of this content to our holdings will further enhance information available about the history of UC San Diego.

We would love to hear how you use UC San Diego Library Digital Collections — whether for work or for fun; for academic or creative projects. Your stories help us improve the site and demonstrate its value. Let us know! You can leave a comment below or email us at dlp@ucsd.edu.

Texas Digital Library Joins Chronopolis Digital Preservation Network

The Texas Digital Library (TDL), along with the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin, has joined the Chronopolis digital preservation network, becoming the first new node since the network’s inception in 2008. Other nodes in the TRAC-certified digital preservation network, which is administered by the UC San Diego Library, include the University of California San Diego; the National Center for Atmospheric Research; and the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.

“By collaborating with other mission-aligned institutions in the Chronopolis network, we are advancing our collective goal of digitally preserving our cultural and scientific heritage for this and future generations,” said Kristi Park, Executive Director of the Texas Digital Library. “In Texas, in particular, this partnership gives our state’s institutions another trusted, non-commercial option for secure long-term storage of their uniquely valuable digital materials.”

Partnering with TACC to provide a local Chronopolis replication node and access to petabyte-scale storage, TDL will offer digital preservation services to its members using DuraCloudTM@TDL for simple ingest and management. Chronopolis services will be part of a broad range of TDL Digital Preservation Services that also include managed commercial storage in the Amazon cloud, as well as Digital Preservation Network (DPN) services. The first DPN node to offer production services, Chronopolis joins DPN as one of TDL’s efforts to provide community-driven long-term preservation alternatives to Amazon storage.

“Having TDL as a partner is a strategic collaboration that makes sense for a number of reasons,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, Principal Administrator for Chronopolis and UC San Diego’s University Librarian. “Having TDL on board will increase the geographical diversity of the Chronopolis network, advance our shared mission to preserve critical digital materials, and extend digital preservation services throughout Texas. Read more…

University Librarian Helps Guide Efforts to Preserve Digitized Buddhist Art in China’s Mogao Caves

Last fall, University Librarian Brian Schottlaender co-chaired an international meeting of librarians and other preservation specialists to advise the Dunhuang Research Academy on preserving thousands of still and moving images of Buddhist art in the Mogao Caves, in Dunhuang in the Gansu province in northwest China.

Neville Agnew_MogaoCavesEntrance

The nine-story temple (Cave 96) houses a colossal Tang dynasty Buddha statue (photo credit: Neville Agnew)

 

The Mogao Caves, which are located at a strategic point along the Silk Route, were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987. The caves comprise 492 temples, featuring some of the finest examples of Buddhist art, spanning some 1,000 years.

Detail of a wall painting at the Mogao Grottoes (photo credit: Francesca Piqué)

Schottlaender and colleagues from the British Library, the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Hermitage Museum, Harvard, UC Berkeley, University of Cincinnati, National Taiwan University, and other prominent institutions, were invited by the Dunhuang Research Academy to the two-day meeting, to begin consulting on a monumental project called Digital Dunhuang.

The Digital Dunhuang initiative was formed with the long-term goal of digitizing the images of the 492 caves and their cultural resources, including 3-D imaging of murals and sculptures, and the development of long-term strategies for managing and preserving these digital resources. Committee members received a three-year appointment from Wang Xudong, director of the Dunhuang Research Academy, and have prepared and submitted a set of recommendations for future activities in three key areas: digital ass et management, digital resource integration, and digital preservation.

Conservators at work in Cave 85 of the Mogao caves (photo credit: Neville Agnew)

Schottlaender’s co-chair at the International Consultative Committee is Professor Pan Yunhe, of the Chinese Academy of Engineering. In addition to the aforementioned participants, other members of the 40-member visiting team include representatives the University of Hong Kong, Microsoft Research Asia, the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, the Russian Academy of Sciences, Peking University, Jawaharlal Nehru University Library, the National Museum in New Delhi, Zhejiang University, Wuhan University, and the University of Science and Technology of China.

Las Misiones Jesuíticas – Digital Exhibit on Display in Geisel Library Through March 16

Posted On: March 1, 2016

Las Misiones Jesuíticas de la región Guaranítica: Una experiencia cultural y social Americana, curated by Ramon Gutiérrez (Universidad de Granada, Spain), is on display through March 16, 2016 at the UC San Diego Library (Geisel West, 2nd floor). The digital exhibit, composed of various images of Jesuit missions and mission communities operating in the greater South American Amazon region, illustrates the economic, cultural, and social ideas and practices that gave rise to this mission system.

Founded by Ignacio de Loyola, Francisco Javier, and others in 1539, the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) would become an effective instrument in the Counter-Reformation. Jesuit evangelizers arrived in Brazil in 1556 and moved north to Peru and Mexico in 1572. As they carried out their evangelizing work among indigenous peoples, Jesuits also developed professional skills, so that their expansion into Europe, Asia, and America forged spaces of worldwide scientific development.

A lecture about the exhibit will be held on Wednesday, March 16 from 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room. Guest speaker, Graciela Maria Viñuales (Ph.D. Architecture, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman), is a specialist in the preservation and conservation of architectural heritage and restoration of monuments in Ibero-American cultures. This event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit can also be seen at the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies Conference, at the Maritime Museum of San Diego, March 17, 2016 – March 20, 2016 and at the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies (CILAS), March 21-March 24, 2016.

The slides displayed in this digital exhibit were initially created in 2013 for the Centro Cultural Borges, Buenos Aires. It has also appeared at Universidad de Congreso (Mendoza, Argentina), Universidad de Cantabria (Santander, Spain), Instituto Ramón Llull (Barcelona, Spain), Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico), Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (Mexico), Universidad de Lima (Perú), and Universidad Católica (Asunción, Paraguay).

The Amazonia project at UC San Diego draws on, archives, produces, and allows researchers to view digital texts, geo-referenced maps of relevant information, and 3D images of objects, urban/agricultural environments, and the forest itself in order to trace and represent this under-explored history.

 

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