2018 Holocaust Living History Workshops Highlight Law, Justice, and Accountability after the Holocaust

Posted On: January 9, 2018

Reconstructed painted ceiling of an 18th-century synagogue that once stood in Gwoździec, an exhibition centerpiece at POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

 

The 2017-18 Holocaust Living History Workshops (HLHW) continue this January at the University of California San Diego with six profound lectures focusing on the roles of memory and justice in the process of renewal following the persecution of countless individuals during the Holocaust. The 2018 speakers will remind us that these concepts constitute the threads that run through the tapestry of a history that is tragic yet also inspiring.

Co-hosted by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program, the HLHW lecture series invites members of the public and campus community to attend the events to hear personal stories and memories from Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars. The goal of the program is to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust while emphasizing their continued relevance in the world today.

All events are free and held on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., with some exceptions (as noted below).

January 17—The Holocaust Litigations: Defining Guilt, Extracting Reparations —With William Lerach

Sponsored by Philip and Gayle Tauber

William Lerach

The first event this winter will be held on Wednesday, January 17 featuring William Lerach who was part of a small group of American lawyers who, decades later, exposed the widespread complicity of major Swiss banks and multi-national German corporations in the Holocaust. Lerach will discuss the litigations that recovered stolen property worth several billion dollars. He’s also a member of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council, and is the recipient of the prestigious Legacy Laureate Award from the University of Pittsburgh. Patrick Patterson, a professor of history at UC San Diego, will provide an introduction and comments.

February 7—Face to Face with Demjanjuk: The Elusive Quest for Closure—With Martin Haas

On Wednesday, February 7, the HLHW series will feature UC San Diego professor emeritus Martin Haas who will share the tragic history of his family’s death and his experience in court where he came face-to-face with the man who was involved in his family’s murder. Haas was born into a Dutch-Jewish family and spent World War II in hiding with a Catholic family. In 1946, he was adopted by a distant relative and emigrated to Israel. Years later he moved to California to pursue a Ph.D.

February 28—East West Street: On the Origins of “Genocide” and “Crimes against Humanity”—With Award-Winning Author, Philippe Sands

Sponsored by William and Michelle Lerach

Philippe Sands

An extraordinary tale about human rights and their adversaries sits at the heart of Philippe Sands’ book, East West Street. A professor of law and director of the Centre on International Courts and Tribunals at University College London, Sands is a regular commentator on the BBC and CNN and writes frequently about international law for leading newspapers. He was prominently featured in My Nazy Legacy, a documentary released in 2015. This event will be held in the Hojel Auditorium at 7:00 p.m. with a reception and book signing to follow. Copies of East West Street will be available for purchase at the event from Warwick’s. RSVP is required at hlhw_sands_eventbrite.com Read more…

Make Your Mark at the Library

Posted On: September 12, 2017

Now Accepting Applications for the Library Student Advisory Council 

Do you want to shape what we do at the Library, meet new peers, and have fun at the same time? Be a changemaker! Join a group of students dedicated to connecting the Library to the campus student body.

The UC San Diego Library is in a dynamic period of change. We believe your voice is essential as we strive to meet our students’ evolving academic needs.

The Library Student Advisory Council (LSAC) is a forum for ongoing dialogue between students and Library staff with the goal of providing the diverse UC San Diego student community with the best possible library services, collections, and spaces.

How do I apply? 
We’re taking applications for the 2017-2018 academic year, with a deadline of Sept. 30, 2017. For more information about the Library Student Advisory Council, visit lib.ucsd.edu/lsac. To apply, click here.

What would I gain from the experience?
Serving on the Council will provide an opportunity to share with Library staff concerns of highest priority to students. Participation can provide connections for future references; be an opportunity to meet new friends, and help create the kind of UC San Diego community students want. You will be an influencing voice in shaping the Library services and spaces important to you and your peers.

Share your thoughts with LSAC via email at lsac@ucsd.edu.

Scarred For Life: An Exhibition of Works by Ted Meyer

Posted On: April 27, 2017

Biomedical Library Exhibition

May 15, 2017 – July 31, 2017    Biomedical Library Building, 1st floor Breezeway

Opening Reception with Artist Ted Meyer

Monday, May 15, 2017     3:00 – 5:00 PM    Biomedical Library Building

“It isn’t just a scar. It’s my scar”

After years of doing work about his own rare illness, and becoming bored by his personal situation, artist Ted Meyer changed focus and began visually telling the stories of other people who have been through major traumas. For more than 16 years Meyer has been creating a graphic yet beautiful depiction of people’s suddenly altered bodies and the resulting scars in an ever-enlarging collection of artworks entitled, Scarred for Life.

Brain Cancer; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

Scarred for Life continues to grow and now consists of nearly 100 artistically enhanced monoprints taken directly from the scarred skin of his subjects. Each image – accompanied by a photographic portrait taken by Ted and a written story by his subject – tells a unique and intriguing story of medical crisis, resilience and healing. The resulting, ever-expanding presentation of mono-prints, narratives, and photographs has been exhibited nationally and received press coverage in such publications as the New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, as well as NPR and PBS. This exhibition was most recently on display at Saint John the Divine in New York City and National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring Maryland.

The opening reception at the Biomedical Library is free and open to the public. No RSVP required. For more information about the event, please contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu.

Open heart surgery at one month – ventricle septic defect; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

A related exhibit of the artist’s work will be on display at the Oceanside Museum of Art from May 27 – September 17, 2017. For more information, visit oma-online.org/meyer.

For more information about the artist, visit tedmeyer.com.

Please Note: All visitors to the UC San Diego campus are required to display a valid parking pass. The closest parking to the Biomedical Library is the Gilman parking structure. More information about parking on campus.

 

 

From Crisis to Change: How to Organize for Action Workshop

Posted On: April 26, 2017

May 10, 2017 workshop on student activism and direct organizationWith Patricia Arroyos, UCSA Statewide Organizing Director,
Cristela Garcia Spitz, Digital Initiatives Librarian,
and Tamara Rhodes, Social Sciences Librarian and Living Archive Coordinator

2 – 4 pm, Wednesday, May 10, 2017
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Register online: http://bit.ly/crisistochange

Doors open at 1:45 pm
Refreshments will be served.

According to Maya Angelou, “the more you know of your history, the more liberated you are.” Knowledge of history, along with direct action organizing, can create significant change by making students aware of their own power in order to alter the existing power relations. In this two-part training, attendees will learn about the history of UC San Diego as it relates to current campus climate, social change, and activism through the Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive project. It will be followed by concrete skills-building to learn the basic principles of direct action organizing. Students will learn the strategies, tools, and organizing math behind direct action that leads to victories for our communities.

This program will be part of a larger suite of programs compiled by the T+LC as part of their spring 2017 Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship program. Participation in any of these workshops gives credit on a student’s co-curricular record (CCR).

Speaker Information:

Patricia Arroyos, UCSA Statewide Organizing Director
As Organizing Director, Paty serves as the primary advocate and support staff for the UC Undergraduate student campaigns. Paty helps students create and implement organizing strategies for successful UCSA campaign development. Paty earned her B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2012. During her time at Berkeley, she directed a student led organization on campus that focused on mentoring at-risk students in Richmond High School, providing the academic tools and resources needed for pursuing higher education. She was also heavily involved in canvassing for local grassroots campaigns such as Environment California and the Human Rights Campaign. As a Los Angeles native and first-generation college graduate, Paty is excited to return to the education sphere and empower students to become advocates for their own education.

Cristela Garcia Spitz, UC San Diego Digital Initiatives Librarian
Cristela collaborates across areas of the library, campus, and community on projects to ensure the long-term accessibility, use, and preservation of the University’s unique collections.  Content such as photographs from the Melanesian Archive and Baja California collections, experimental recordings from the Department of Music, and all types of objects on Oceanography are available in UC San Diego’s Digital Collections website.  For the Tell Us How UC It project, she worked on the submission process, timeline, and technical infrastructure for the physical and digital exhibit.

Tamara Rhodes, UC San Diego Social Sciences Librarian and Living Archive Coordinator
Tamara started at UC San Diego in August 2015 as an Instruction Librarian and became the Subject Librarian for Psychology, Cognitive Science, Human Development, and Linguistics in January 2017. In 2013, Tamara won the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Student Paper Award for her paper on living archives, which was subsequently published. This became the basis for the Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive project. After attending the BGSA and GSA Race Relations Town Hall in April 2016, Tamara believed a living archive could be a way for the library to help support the social movements happening in the UC San Diego student community.

This event is free and intended for current UC San Diego undergraduate and graduate students. For questions or more information, please contact Tamara Rhodes, tlrhodes@ucsd.edu.

Sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the University of California Student Association.

Film Screening: Chicano Park

Posted On: March 28, 2017

Film Screening: Chicano Park
Monday, May 1, 2017
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Noon – 1:00 PM

historical picture of chicano park murals

[Chicano Park Murals, between 1964 and 2007]. Herman Baca Papers. MSS 0649. Special Collections & Archives, UC San Diego.

The theme for this year’s Cesar Chavez Celebration is United, Resistant & Unafraid!  Join us for a screening of the documentary Chicano Park. From the book Mediating History, “This documentary traces the history of the San Diego Chicano community of Logan Heights, or Barrio Logan. This is a story of artists and community organizers who resisted the encroachment of freeways and urban development which divided their community. In the 1920s, Barrio Logan was the second largest Mexican-American community on the West Coast; but the community was uprooted during the Depression, when large numbers of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were deported under US government policies intended to protect jobs for Anglos.

In the 1960s, Chicano community activists fought to build a park on a parcel of land under the freeway. Civic and cultural pride came together in an historical vision of the Southwest that traced its origins to the mythical Aztec homeland of Aztlan, located in what is now the US Southwest, and continues the settlement of the barrio in 1900. Community residents, artists and activists discuss the long process of creating Chicano Park, which was finally opened in 1970 on a freeway underpass. The park became the site for community events and expressions from cultural performances to murals.

This is a look at a community which set out to reclaim its cultural roots, land, and heritage.”

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served!

For questions or more information, please contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

Abrash, B., & Egan, C. (1992). Mediating history: The MAP guide to independent video by and about African American, Asian American, Latino, and Native American people. New York: New York University Press.

The University and the Universe: A Black Feminist Archive of the Possible

Posted On: March 18, 2017


Alexis Gumbs

The University and the Universe:
A Black Feminist Archive of the Possible
Wednesday, April 19, 2017
1:00 – 3:00 PM
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
RSVP:  ucsd.libcal.com/event/3233074

Sista Docta Alexis Pauline Gumbs will offer an interactive training for students, staff and community members interested in connecting their global passions to their daily lives within the structure of the university.  Using writing, listening, and small and large group activities, we will explore self, space, power, and purpose.

Alexis Pauline Gumbs is a queer black trouble-maker and a black feminist love evangelist. She walks in the legacy of black lady school teachers in post slavery communities who offered sacred educational space to the intergenerational newly free in exchange for the random necessities of life. As the first person to do archival research in the papers of Audre Lorde, June Jordan and Lucille Clifton while achieving her PhD in English, Africana Studies and Women’s Studies at Duke University, she honors the lives and creative works of Black feminist geniuses as sacred texts for all people. She believes that in the time we live in, access to the intersectional holistic brilliance of the black feminist tradition is as crucial as learning how to read.

This free event is open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Lia Friedman at lgfriedman@ucsd.edu.

Sponsored by the Library Diversity & Inclusion Committee and Library Training.

Gender Equity & Health: A Discussion with Dr. Anita Raj

Posted On: February 15, 2017

Gender inequities and gender based violence pose a major threat to the health and full social and economic development of women and girls across the globe. Join Dr. Anita Raj to discuss the issues being tackled by the UC San Diego Center on Gender Equity and Health.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

5:00 – 6:00 PM

Anita Raj, PhD, is a Professor of Medicine and Global Public Health and Founding Director of the Center on Gender Equity and Health at the University of California San Diego. Dr. Raj is a developmental psychologist and public health researcher with more than 20 years of experience conducting studies in the areas reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH), sexual and reproductive health (SRH) including HIV, gender-based violence, substance use, engaging men and boys in SRH and RMNCH interventions, and the health effects of child marriage and adolescent motherhood. Her research has focused on South Asia, the United States, Russia, and more recently, West and Central Africa. Read more…

Creativity and Purpose: The NIA Cultural Organization and Black Power in San Diego, 1967-1977

Posted On: February 13, 2017

Creativity and Purpose: The NIA Cultural Organization and Black Power in San Diego, 1967-1977
With Mychal Odom
Monday, February 27, 2017
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Noon – 1:00 PM

NotesSlidesAudio

 

Letters from the NIA Cultural Organization

[Letters from the NIA Cultural Organization, 1977-1980]. Herman Baca Papers. MSS 0649. Special Collections & Archives, UC San Diego.

 

NIA picket

[NIA picket, between 1964 and 2007]. Herman Baca Papers. MSS 0649. Special Collections & Archives, UC San Diego.

The very publicized shooting between the Black Panther Party and Us Organization at UC Los Angeles’ Campbell Hall in January 1969 has often been understood as the decline of the Black Power movement in Southern California specifically, and the United States more generally.  However, as Mychal Odom will explain, a study of the National Involvement Association (NIA) Cultural Organization intervenes into that reading of the Black Liberation Movement.  Founded by former advocates of the San Diego Us Organization in 1970, NIA “very likely saved the Black Power Movement in San Diego” as Mychal Odom argues in his doctoral research.  Drawing from oral histories he has conducted, private collection material, periodicals, and rare materials housed in the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, Odom will explain the role NIA’s educational programming, cultural work, labor activism, and African liberation support continued the work of Black Power and laid the very important ground for anti-apartheid struggles in San Diego during the 1970s and 1980s.

Mychal Odom is a doctoral candidate in the UC San Diego History Department and a Hill Fellowship recipient.  A resident of San Diego since 1997, Odom has over ten years of teaching experience in Black Studies at the college and university level.  At UC San Diego, he has been active in the Black Graduate Student Association and the Black Studies Project.  He is also a member of Pillars of the Community San Diego, a community organization who fights for the rights of formerly incarcerated people and their families, among their many other projects.

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served!

For questions or more information, please contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

Valentine’s Day Free Screening of the Movie “Loving”

Posted On: February 3, 2017

The Library’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee is proud to sponsor an exhibit located in Geisel West on the 1st floor to promote the Office for the Prevention of Harassment & Discrimination (OPHD)’s screening of the movie Loving.  The FREE screening will be held on:

Tuesday, February 14

Price Center Theatre

6:00 PM

Loving celebrates the real-life courage and commitment of an interracial couple, Richard and Mildred Loving (Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga), who married and then spent the next nine years fighting for the right to live as a family in their hometown. Their civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia, went all the way to the Supreme Court, which in 1967 reaffirmed the very foundation of the right to marry – and their love story has become an inspiration to couples ever since. The film has been nominated for numerous awards, including a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor for Joel Edgerton and Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for Ruth Negga.

OPHD’s mission is to educate the UC San Diego community about issues of bias, harassment and discrimination, and to assist with the prevention and resolution of these issues in a fair and responsible manner. In 2002, OPHD started Sex in the Cinema, sponsoring free screenings that highlight themes of sex and gender in popular films. Now, they also select films that include themes about race, religion, disability or veteran’s status and other protected categories and they pose questions to the audience before the film starts to increase awareness of bias, harassment and discrimination issues. The films provide a compelling forum for OPHD to engage the campus community through cinematic depictions of gender, race and other stereotypes, harassment and discrimination, and to advertise resources available to students and campus affiliates. For more information visit, ophd.ucsd.edu/programs/sex-in-cinema.

Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive

Posted On: December 16, 2016


collage of images from the Tell Us How UC It Living Archive

Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive
Exhibit:
February – March 2017, Geisel Library, 2nd (main floor), near Seuss Room
Online Collection: https://library.ucsd.edu/tellushowucit/

From Crisis to Change: The Student Experience & Activism on Campus
Program & Reception: February 1, 2017 ● 3-5 pm ● Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Recording of the event: https://youtu.be/3GA0GIWRUCU

“Inclusion doesn’t happen spontaneously when an environment becomes more diverse.  We have to be intentional in creating a welcoming environment in which all students, faculty and staff can thrive and reach their full potential.”
—Becky Petitt, Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, UC San Diego

 

UC San Diego prides itself on having a diverse student body. And no wonder, diversity, as numerous studies have shown, enriches everyone.  But as many colleges have discovered, diversity alone is not enough. Promoting diversity without attention to inclusion, mutual understanding, and supporting the needs of all students, particularly traditionally underrepresented groups, can backfire. Badly.

Over the past decade and as recently as the last month, there have been a number of incidents on the  campus that have targeted specific underrepresented groups.  These recurring events affect ALL students, underrepresented or not, and demonstrate the need for a conversation about student experiences related to the campus climate at UC San Diego. This conversation is not top down. UC San Diego has a rich history of student activism. From the university’s beginning, moments of crisis have been met by student-led transformative action.

The UC San Diego Library has begun  a “living archive,” a collection of materials presented in a way that allows for the expression, exhibition, documentation, and preservation of a sentiment or movement in a particular community.  This type of “archiving” is living because it includes content that offers real-time feedback on a particular era. The archive encompasses all manner of material from documents of the past to creative expression through art, film, writing and more.

By  highlighting the campus’s  past of evolving from crisis to accomplishing change, we can bring people together to raise questions, spark conversations, and promote multicultural understanding.

At 3pm on Wednesday, February 1, 2017, the UC San Diego Library will host “From Crisis to Change: The Student Experience & Activism on Campus.” Join us for a panel discussion with staff, faculty, and alumni who have been on the front lines of change at UC San Diego. The panelists will include: Fnann Keflezighi (UCSD Thurgood Marshall College), Angela Kong (UCSD OASIS), Jorge Mariscal (UCSD Literature), and Agustín Orozco (UCSD OASIS).

The event will include a reception and time to view the exhibit.  This free event is open to the public. Questions and general inquiries can be directed to Tamara Rhodes, tlrhodes@ucsd.edu.

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