Artistic Display Brings Zooplankton Into Focus

UCSD student’s art show inspired by collaboration with the Jaffe Lab at Scripps

Original Article Written By: Brittany Hook, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

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Artistic depictions of zooplankton currently adorn the walls of UC San Diego’s Geisel Library, as well as the entrance of the Biomedical Library, thanks to a showcase created by UC San Diego biology student and artist Elizabeth Stringer.

Stringer’s two-part exhibit, My Meditations End in Reverie, was inspired by the time she has spent working as a volunteer in the Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imagery and in the Physical-Biological Interactions Lab of biological oceanographer Peter Franks at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, a part of UC San Diego. The exhibit’s paintings and backlit photographs bring to life the mysterious world of zooplankton, microscopic animals that float near the surface in marine environments.

This project has allowed Stringer, a double major in human biology and studio arts, to combine her passion for science with the arts. “I use my art practice to express my own passion that I have for biology and to play and make sense of the biological facts swimming in my head,” said Stringer. Read more…

Missing: The Fate of the Nazi Concentration Camp Archives

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Don’t miss the final Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) of the 2014-2015 academic year on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 in the Seuss Room of the Geisel Library from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

The workshop, The Fate of the Nazi Concentration Camp Archives, will feature J.J. Surbeck, a Swiss-educated attorney who served 16 years with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

The ICRC was founded in 1863 as a private Swiss organization, striving to ensure protection and assistance for victims of armed conflict and help reunite POWs and uprooted civilians with their families. In 1864, it persuaded governments to adopt the first Geneva Convention, the treaty that required armies to care for wounded soldiers, whatever side they were on.

With the Nazi conquest of most of Europe resulting in the displacement of millions of individuals, the British Red Cross and the ICRC began working together to trace victims of incarceration, forced labor, and relocation in 1943. This effort eventually led to the establishment of the

International Tracing Service (ITS), which is now a massive archive in Bad Arolsen, Germany containing 30 million records on the survivors and victims of the Nazi concentration camps.

Surbeck will discuss the inter-workings and history of the ICRC and the role it played in WWII. This event is free and open to the public. No reservation necessary. Refreshments will be served.

For more information about the HLHW, which is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and Judaic Studies Program, please contact Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

‘San Diego Welcomes the World’ Salutes Centenary of Panama–California Exposition of 1915

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San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, which commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal, and launched the City as an international venue. The construction of the Panama Canal was an immense engineering feat, dramatically cutting the distance and cost of international shipping by opening a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It also proved to be an excellent opportunity for enhancing San Diego’s profile–as it would become the first port north of the Panama Canal on the West Coast of the United States.  The event also provided San Diego leaders with the impetus for transforming Balboa Park from an undeveloped, arid property, into a lush and distinctly Spanish paradise. The 1915 Exposition led to both the greening of Balboa Park as well as the creation of the park’s cultural institutions and stunning Spanish Revival architecture.

The exhibition, which is on display on the main floor in Geisel Library (2nd floor, West Wing) until July 5, 2015, includes images of some of the few permanent structures designed for the fair, including the California Tower and dome, the Cabrillo Bridge, and the Spreckels Organ Pavilion. Other items in the exhibit include souvenir books and postcards, newspaper articles, sheet music, a special student admittance pass, maps of the Canal, and more.

Carillon Chimes atop Geisel Library Make Telematic Debut at La Jolla Symphony Concerts

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On Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, the La Jolla Symphony & Chorus will premiere The Moon in La Jolla, the 2015 winner of the prestigious Nee Commission Award. In addition to the classic orchestral ensemble, the UC San Diego Library’s carillon, which sits atop Geisel Library, will make its debut in the La Jolla Symphony performances via telematic technology.

This “tele-concerto” incorporates technology that allows musicians to play music together from different sites via the Internet. Thus, for the first time in the carillon’s 26-year history, the orchestra in Mandeville Auditorium will play in real-time with a carillon soloist from atop Geisel Library at the May 2 and 3 concerts.

Truly a 21st century work, the innovative musical piece was composed by UC San Diego Ph.D. candidate and Hong Kong composer, Yeung-ping Chen, and is based on a poem written by Hong Kong poet and UC San Diego alumnus, Leung Ping-Kwan, also known by the pen name Yasi. Ping-Kwan crafted the poem, The Moon in La Jolla, when he was studying at UC San Diego in the late 1970s.

Yeung-ping Chen, an award-winning composer, has been the recipient of numerous prizes and grants, including the prestigious Altius Fellowship from the Asian Cultural Council. Chen, who is currently studying with UC San Diego Music Professor Lei Liang, is conducting research on telematics musical composition, performative strategies for electro-acoustic music, and a hyper-transcriptional compositional process which he calls “Sonic Engraving.”

The carillon in Geisel Library, is operated by musician Scott Paulson, a UC San Diego alumnus and Library employee. Paulson, who performs noon concerts and musical requests on the carillon, has been collaborating for many months with Chen, Library staff, and La Jolla Symphony musicians to bring the “tele-concerto” to fruition.

For more information about the concerts, or to purchase tickets, visit lajollasymphony.com.

Archive for New Poetry Previews Audio Clips from Blackburn Collection

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Join us for this “virtual reading” that will feature newly digitized recordings from the large archive of poetry readings created by poet and translator Paul Blackburn [1926-1971]. Blackburn played an important role in the New York poetry community, and his archive has been described as “the most comprehensive oral history of the New York poetry scene between the late 1950s and 1970.”

Thursday, May 7
4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Seuss Room, Geisel Library

The readings that Blackburn recorded are now being digitized by the UC San Diego Library. They were indexed soon after their acquisition in 1973 by UC San Diego Literature Professor Michael Davidson, who had recently been hired as the first curator of the Archive for New Poetry and who was instrumental in acquiring the final segment of Blackburn’s papers. During his tenure as curator, he built the Archive for New Poetry into one of the world’s preeminent collections documenting experimental post-WW II poetry and has continued to promote it and to advise the Library on its subsequent development. The event will honor Davidson’s many contributions to the Library over the past 40 years. An exhibit of his own works and manuscripts will be on display at the reception following the reading. This event is free and open to the public.

Read more…

2015 Earth Week DIY Maker’s Day Photo Booth

We had a great time learning all the ways you help save the environment by taking action every day! As promised, here are the pictures from the Photo Booth station– https://www.flickr.com/photos/ucsd_libraries/sets/72157652139702701/

If you would like your image removed, please email the request, including link to the image, to Gayatri Singh (gasingh@ucsd.edu).

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A recent addition to the Library’s National Poetry Month project

April is National Poetry Month, a time when the Library honors the poetic spirit of our own community by providing a virtual space for people to share poetry. We honor and feature poets who are both published and unpublished, whose poems reflect all poetic styles. This is our second year in providing this virtual space for sharing poetry, and, like last year, we’ve already had another great response to this project. We want to thank all the poets who contributed video and audio clips of their work!

We will continue to post submissions throughout April, so if you are a poet or a poetry lover and want to contribute, please send us a video or an audio file (up to 10 minutes) of you either reading your own work, talking about your work, or reading the work of a poet who has inspired you. Send your submissions to the project’s creator, Christina Continelli at: ccontinelli@ucsd.edu.

 

Our most recent submission is from Tendai R. Mwanaka:

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(Tendai R. Mwanaka reads two poems–“Ode to Grief” and “I am the Only Needle“)

Tendai. R. Mwanaka is a multidisciplinary artist from Chitungwiza, Zimbabwe. His oeuvre of works touches on literary disciplines (non-fictions, poetry, plays, fictions), music and sound art disciplines, visual art disciplines (photography, drawings, paintings, video,collage…) inter-genres and inter-disciplines etc… Voices from Exile, a poetry collection on Zimbabwe’s political situation and exile in South Africa came out from Lapwing Publications, Northern Ireland, 2010, Keys in the River, a novel of interlinked short fictions came out from Savant Books and Publications, 2012, Zimbabwe: The Blame Game, a book of creative non fictions on Zimbabwe came out from Langaa RPCIG, 2013. Forthcoming books include; Zimbabwe: The Urgency of Now (creative non-fictions) from Langaa RPCIG, A Dark Energy (full length novel) from Aignos Publishing Inc, Finding a Way Home (short fictions) from Savant. Work has been published in over 300 journals, anthologies and magazines in over 27 countries. Nominated, shortlisted and won some prizes and work has been translated into French and Spanish.
 

 

 

 

Preserve, Protect, Pass It On: Celebrating National Preservation Week

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As spring cleaning gets underway, many will be left to contemplate how to preserve new-found treasures. From April 26 – May 2, libraries across the country will provide information and expertise on how to preserve collectibles, digital photos, family records and much more. At UC San Diego Library, we understand the importance of ensuring our university’s resources live on. In fact we have a whole team of preservation experts dedicated to granting our students, faculty and researchers access to what they need, when they need it, and in the form that is most useful to them.

Join us in celebration of National Preservation Week as we demonstrate a variety of book repairs. Preservation staff will be on hand to answer any questions you have. They will also provide you with a handout for more information on how to make your own personal memories – photo collections, letters, family records, and other valuable materials – last for generations.

Thursday, April 30
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Geisel Library, East Wing 2nd Fl
Event is open to the public.

For more information on the Library’s preservation efforts, visit http://libraries.ucsd.edu/about/pubs/domain/2015/spring/joaquim-qa.html

La Jolla Symphony Premiere to Include Telematic Approach Featuring Geisel Library Chimes

On Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, UC San Diego’s La Jolla Symphony & Chorus will premiere The Moon in La Jolla, the 2015 winner of the prestigious Nee Commission Award. Composed by UC San Diego Ph.D. candidate and Hong Kong composer Yeung-ping Chen, this orchestral piece features telematic technology which allows musicians to play music together from different sites via the internet. At the May concerts, the audience in UC San Diego’s Mandeville Auditorium will experience the Geisel Library chimes (rooftop clock/carillon) as they interact with La Jolla Symphony through this telematic approach.Composer Yeung-ping Chen

Yeung-ping Chen’s innovative musical piece is based on a poem, The Moon in La Jolla, written by Hong Kong poet and UC San Diego alumnus Leung Ping-Kwan, also known by the pen name Yasi. Leung Ping-Kwan crafted the poem when he was studying at UC San Diego in the late 1970s.

Since this orchestral work is tailor-made for the Geisel Library chimes and because April is National Poetry Month, the Library is hosting a special exhibition and reading to celebrate this intersection of poetry and music. All are welcome to gather outside on the Forum Level of the Library at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, April 21, where special guest Suyin Mak, Hong Kong music theorist and poet (CUHK Professor and currently a scholar-in-residence at UCLA), read the Yasi poem. UC San Diego carillonneur, Scott Paulson, will perform chiming musical passages of Yeung-ping Chen’s composition in response to the imaginative poem.

Immediately after the reading, the audience is invited into a Library exhibition area (Geisel West, 1st floor) for refreshments. The composer, carillonneur, and Visual Arts student Kim Garcia– collabora  tors of The Moon in La Jolla exhibit — will be on hand to discuss and explain the displayed items, some of which have been donated by Yasi’s widow for this event. They will also share the experience of collaboration, emphasizing Yasi’s works and his memories of life at UC San Diego, showing a parallel view of composer Yeung-ping Chen, and examining the special fellowship between poet Yasi, composer “Ping” and their various mentors.

Earth Week DIY Maker’s Day

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The Library and the Environmental Sustainability Group is hosting a DIY Makers Day celebrating Earth Week on campus, using sustainable, non-toxic, reusable, and recyclable materials. Maker stations include:

  • make your own cleaning supplies (be extra green and bring your own container!)
  • make your own button using recycled book covers
  • make boxes and bookmarks using recycled paper
  • make your own body sugar scrub (be extra green and bring your own container!)
  • plant a succulent
  • watch a demonstration of a 3D Printer (vegetable-based plastic!)

Participants will leave with a sample of a project and ideas to continue making eco-friendly products and reusing consumables on a daily basis!

 

Wednesday, April 22nd
11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library

Refreshments will be served!
Open to the public!

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