New Writing Series Features Award-Winning Poets and Multi-Genre Novelists

UC San Diego’s New Writing Series is excited to announce their upcoming readings from Ari Banias, Vanessa Angélica Villareal, Ronaldo Wilson, and Kate Bernheimer. The events are free and open to the public. Hosted in partnership with the Department of Literature and the Division of Arts and Humanities.

Ari Banias — Wednesday, January 23 — Geisel Library, Seuss Room at 5 p.m.Ari Banias photo 2

Banias is the author of Anybody, which was named a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the PEN Center USA Literary Award. His poems have appeared in various journals, in Troubling The Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and as part of the MOTHA exhibition Transgender History in 99 Objects. He is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and Stanford University’s Wallace Stegner program. Banias works with small press books and teaches poetry in the Bay Area. His most recent chapbook, A Symmetry, was published by The Song Cave in 2018.

Vanessa Angélica Villareal — Wednesday, January 30 — Geisel Library, Seuss Room at 5 p.m. 

VAV-Blue.jpgVillareal was born in the Rio Grande Valley borderlands to formerly undocumented Mexican immigrants. She is the author of the collection Beast Meridian, winner of the John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry from the Texas Institute of Letters, and featured as a best-of book at The Los Angeles Times, NBC News, BOMB, Literary Hub, Bustle, and Entropy. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Rumpus, The Boston Review, The Academy of American Poets, BuzzFeed, Epiphany, PBS Newshour and elsewhere. She is a CantoMundo Fellow, and is currently pursuing her doctorate in English Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, where she is raising her son with the help of a loyal dog.  Read more…

2019 Black History Month

Cookbooks by Early Black Californians 1900-1936
with Dr. Hanna Garth

Monday, February 11, 2019
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Noon – 1:00 PM
Doors open at 11:45am. Light refreshments will be served.

 

The theme for this year’s Black History Month is Black Migration: The Movement of African People Across the Diaspora. Join us for an engaging lecture by Dr. Hanna Garth on “Cookbooks by Early Black Californians 1900-1936.”  This talk documents culinary practices in early patterns of Black migration to Southern California.  This talk draws on an analysis of two cookbooks, The Federation Cookbook: a Collection of Tested Recipes by the Colored Women of Southern California (1909) and Eliza’s Cookbook Favorite Recipes of the Negro Culinary Art Club (1936).  Based on this analysis this talk illuminates the forms of cooking that were central to early Black migrants to Southern California, tracing the culinary influences from other regions of the United States.

Dr. Hanna Garth is a sociocultural and medical anthropologist specializing in the anthropology of food. Her work addresses issues of inequality and structural violence, with regional interests in Latin American, the Caribbean, and the United States.  She received her PhD in Anthropology from UC Los Angeles in 2014, and an MPH focused in Global Health from Boston University in 2006.  Dr. Garth has been a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, and a Mellon Mays fellow.  She is co-convener of the UC San Diego Food and Society Research Group.

 

Feeding Body & Soul: Migration and Black Culinary Traditions

Feeding Body & Soul: Migration and Black Culinary Traditions Exhibit
In the early 1900s, looking for better opportunities, many African Americans left the South and headed to the North and West.  As they settled into new neighborhoods, one constant was the food shared around the kitchen table and the special dishes that no family or community gathering could do without. Over time and distance, black culinary heritage has mingled the flavors of exile and home, drawing together families, defining community. Come to Geisel Library for a taste of this history and enjoy an exhibit that offers up a delectable sampling of cookbooks and a celebration of black cuisine and food culture. This exhibit, located in Geisel Library’s 2nd Floor (West Wing), will be on display from February 1 – 28, 2019.

This event is free and open to the public. No reservation required. For more information, contact Gayatri Singh (gasingh@ucsd.edu).

The Spanish Civil War 1936-1939

In July 1936, officers of the Spanish military initiated an uprising against their own Republican government in Spanish-held Morocco, as other planned uprisings were held throughout mainland Spain. General Francisco Franco took charge of the military coup and Spain was soon embroiled in a civil war.

The Spanish Civil War 1936-1939 Exhibit
Geisel Library, 2nd Floor West
On view through February 17

As historian Matt Crawford has written:

“Beyond the implications of the civil war in terms of Spain’s own history, the war is viewed, retrospectively, as a prelude to the larger ideological conflicts between fascism, communism, and democracy that eventually consumed all of Europe in World War II. The Spanish Civil War is also remembered as a testing ground for new techniques and technologies of both 20th-century warfare — as immortalized in the bombing of Guernica — and 20th-century media as represented by the rise of war photography and photojournalism.”

Read more…

Yearlong Holocaust Lecture Series Offers Perspective on Gender, Humanity and Resistance

 

The 2018-2019 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) series continues this winter at the University of California San Diego with an author talk, film screening and lecture. In line with this year’s theme of “History, Memory & Meaning of the Holocaust,” each workshop features a Holocaust survivor, witness, or scholar who lends their experience and expertise to highlight memories of the Holocaust that are constantly being written, erased and rewritten. The series is presented by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program.

January 17 — When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust with Marion Kaplan

With support from Muir College and Sixth College

Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection “When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany” raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. The publication edited by Renate Bridenthal, Atina Grossman and Marion Kaplan explored women’s double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In her lecture, Kaplan takes the audience on a historical tour of her research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies. RSVP is required at https://hlhw-kaplan.eventbrite.com.

*This event is sold out but walk-ins will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis if seats become available.

February 6 — 49,172: The Rescue of Bulgaria’s Jews with Atanas Kolev

Sponsored by Daniel and Phyllis Epstein

The saving of the entire Jewish minority in Bulgaria is an extraordinary act of humanism and yet unbeknownst to many. In this documentary, a team of U.S.-based Bulgarian filmmakers embark on a journey to discover how the country was able to shield their Jewish community from deportation and execution. Drawing on private and public archives in the U.S., Israel and Bulgaria, the film depicts a mosaic of faces and stories woven together by the courage and resourcefulness of individuals in both powerful and powerless positions. The screening will be followed by a conversation with producer Atanas Kolev. RSVP is required at https://hlhw-kolev.eventbrite.comRead more…

Vladimir Vysotsky, a Russian Cultural Legend: A Talk by Dmitry Bykov

 

Dmitry Bykov

Vladimir Vysotsky: a Russian Cultural Legend
Thursday, January 24 • 5 – 7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
RSVP: bykov_talks_vysotsky.eventbrite.com
Accompanying exhibit on display in Geisel West, 2nd Floor through March 22

Vladimir Vysotsky. Photo Credit: Igor Palmin.

Vladimir Vysotsky (1938-1980) was a singer, songwriter, actor, and poet — a giant in Russian popular music and popular culture alike. Vysotsky was an icon of the 1960s and continues to unite the Russian-speaking diaspora.

In commemoration of what would have been Vysotsky’s 80th birthday, the UC San Diego Library is hosting an ongoing winter quarter exhibit on the late singer’s life and legacy. Included in the exhibit is a commemorative medal on loan from Riga, Latvia in appreciation of the university’s ongoing relationship with the Russian-speaking diaspora community.

Dmitry Bykov, Moscow-based scholar, novelist, and poet will discuss Vysotsky’s life, work, and legacy. The lecture and exhibit are jointly sponsored by the UC San Diego Library; the UC San Diego Institute of Arts and Humanities; Jewish Studies; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program; and the San Diego-based European Staff Association.

Dmitry Bykov is a celebrated Russian writer, poet, and journalist. He is a well-loved host of television and radio programs in Russia, and is the co-creator, with Mikhail Yefremov, of the popular Citizen Poet project, which presents contemporary Russian topics in the form of classic poetry. His fiction writing includes the novels, Justification (2001), Orthography (2003), How Putin Became President of the USA: New Russian Fairy Tales (2005), Living Souls (2006), X (2012), and The Block: A Walkthrough (2014). He has published biographies of Boris Pasternak, Maxim Gorky, and the singer-songwriter, Bulat Okudzhava, as well as several collections of essays and poetry. He lectures widely in Russia and abroad.

For more information about the event, please contact the event coordinator, Mariah Fellows.

When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust with Marion Kaplan

When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust
with Marion Kaplan
Thursday, January 17 • 5 – 7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Register: hlhw-kaplan.eventbrite.com

*This event is sold out but walk-ins will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis if seats become available.

The Holocaust Living History Workshop series continues with an insightful talk from Marion Kaplan on Thursday, January 17.

Marion Kaplan

Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. The publication, edited by Renate Bridenthal, Atina Grossman and Marion Kaplan, explored women’s “double jeopardy” as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Kaplan takes the audience on a historical tour of this research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies.

Kaplan is the Skirball Professor of Modern Jewish History at NYU and the three-time winner of the National Jewish Book Award for her books The Making of the Jewish Middle Class: Women, Family, and Identity in Imperial Germany (Oxford University Press, 1991); Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (Oxford University Press, 1998); and Gender and Jewish History, co-edited with Deborah Dash Moore (Indiana University Press, 2011).

UC San Diego Library’s ‘Food for Fine$’ Drive Returns for Holidays

The UC San Diego Library is partnering with the Triton Food Pantry again to give back to our campus community this holiday season.

Bring food items to donate to the Front Desk at either Geisel or the Biomedical Library buildings between Sunday, December 2 through Saturday, December 15 (Week 10 & Finals Week) for $2 per item off your library fines from Fall Quarter. All donated items go to the Triton Food Pantry.

Food for Fine$
Sunday, December 2 – Saturday, December 15
Geisel Library & Biomedical Library buildings

Guidelines
• Fines eligible for dismissal include course reserve and recall overdues, billing fees, and processing fees (no replacement charges)
• Fines must be from the current term: Fall Quarter 2018: Weeks 1-9
• Earn credits to a maximum of $40
• Fines already paid may be credited
• Food donations accepted at Geisel & BLB Front Desks
• Small, individually-wrapped items in a larger bundle will count as one item (e.g. fruit cups in 4-pack)

Most Needed Items
• $5 credit for Cereal (18oz) or Oatmeal (8pck)
• Cereal, oatmeal, rice, pasta/sauce
• Canned meats (tuna, chicken, ham)
• Dry or canned beans
• Peanut butter or granola bars
• Canned soup or cooking oils
• Canned fruits or vegetables

Ineligible Items
• Items expiring before 2/1/19
• Open, dented, or damaged packages
• Items in glass containers
• Perishable or homemade items
• Ramen, soda, gum, chips, or candy

For more information about the Food for Fine$ program, contact staff at either the Geisel or BLB Front Desks.

Liyana – an animated documentary

For World Aids Day, Liyana, an award winning animated documentary will be screened at the Price Center Theater Friday, November 30, 2018. Liyana tells the story of 5 children in southern Africa with a message of hope and perseverance. The event will also include a panel on HIV research, a Q&A with the filmmaker, and a Meet & Greet time.

Liyana animated documentary

The event presented by Tritons for Gender Equity and the Center on Gender Equity and Health. After the screening, the film will become part of the Library’s collection for viewing in the classroom or at the Library.  More details on the Facebook Liyana Film Screening Events page.

Grab Coffee with Your Librarians

Take a coffee break and connect with a librarian in your field of study!

2018 Turkey Calling Show

Turkey Calling Show
Wednesday, November 21 • Noon – 1 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Thanksgiving is just around the corner! Join the UC San Diego Library for its Turkey Calling Show, an annual community tradition. Come and learn about the American turkey’s surprising presence in European art and the bird itself through turkey calling techniques.

Presented as an old-time radio hour, this celebration is filled with music, sound effects and stories of interest. UC San Diego alumnus, Scott Paulson,  who has been lauded by the San Diego Union-Tribune for his family-friendly shows, will be hosting the event.

This event is free and open to the public. No reservation required. For more information, contact Scott Paulson at (858) 822-5758.

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