Want to Read a Banned Book?

Banned Books Week 2014 @ UC San Diego Library                                                           BBW

Virtual Read-Out Invitation

The Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event promoting the freedom to read by the American Library Association.

This year, the UC San Diego Library will record and share Virtual Read-Out videos in anticipation of the Live BBW Read-Out on Wednesday, Oct. 1.

You may participate in the Virtual Read-Out through a three minute video to:

  • Talk about a meaningful banned/challenged book, or
  • Read from a banned/challenged book.

Recording Times:

  • July 21, Monday, from 8:00am – 9:30 am
  • July 24, Thursday, from 8:00am – 9:30 am
    (you pick a 15 minute time slot by signing up)

Location: Seuss Room, Geisel Library                   BBW sign up                   

Details & to Sign up: http://ucsd.libguides.com/BBWparticipate

For ideas, visit:

See our Banned Books Week LibGuide for more information: http://ucsd.libguides.com/bannedbooks

Brought to you by the UC San Diego Library. Contact Adele at abarsh@ucsd.edu or 858-534-1249 for more information.

Steampunk Tea at The Library

Steampunk TeaSteampunk Tea! Join futurists, adventurers, and writers from from the Clarion Science Fiction Workshop at UCSD for a lively event, Sunday, June 29, 3-5:00pm in Geisel.

The tea—which is free and open to the public— will be a celebration of steampunk literature, which re-imagines the Victorian Era with a sci-fi aesthetic in a steam-powered world. Steampunk Tea, 2012

Gaslight Gathering leader, Anastasia Hunter, will present a unique look into the Steampunk movement, and guests will enjoy live Steampunk-themed chamber music, films, Victorian Era paper theatre models, magic lanterns and a real working time machine!

http://libraries.ucsd.edu/blogs/events/steampunk-tea/

Steampunk Tea, 2012

Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered

ruthRuth Klüger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis’ “model ghetto.” Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Klüger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir Still Alive, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Klüger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write. At this event, she will be introduced by history professor Frank Biess.

Sponsored by Phyllis and Dan Epstein Co-sponsored by International House at UCSD

When: Wednesday May 14, 2014, 5 pmstill alive

Where: Great Hall at International House, UC San Diego

Who: free and open to the public – refreshments served 

UCSD & the Local Ecosystem: Insights from Wireless & Biotech

UC San Diego and the Local Ecosystem: Insights from Wireless and Biotech
UC San Diego Library Seuss Room
Thursday, May 15, 2014
3:30 – 5:00PM

UC San Diego has played a central role in the development of the San Diego high-technology economy in both the wireless and biotechnology industries. Dean Mary Walshok (UCSD) and Professor Steven Casper (Keck Graduate Institute) will present results from their chapters on UC San Diego in the forthcoming Stanford University Press book Public Universities and Regional Development: Insights from the University of California edited by Martin Kenney (UC Davis) and David Mowery (UC Berkeley).

SDTA_may_15_event

Holocaust Living History Workshop Series Continues

UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW), co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the Judaic1389.5 Holocaust B Studies Program, will present two final lectures in its “Journeys, Memories, Echoes” series. The HLHW is an educational outreach program whose aim is to broaden understanding of the past, to foster tolerance, and to preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. Members of the campus community and the public have an opportunity to meet with survivors and scholars and to learn more about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest compendium of Holocaust video testimony.

On Wednesday, May 7th, Ian Hancock will talk about his ground-breaking research Porrajmos: The Romanis and the Holocaust. The Judeocide is by far the best studied aspect of the Nazi agenda of persecution and destruction, while other victims have received comparatively little popular and scholarly coverage. It is a little known fact, for example, that the Holocaust claimed anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million Romani lives. Hancock will address this tragedy the Romani and Sinti refer to as “the Devouring” (Porrajmos).

HLHW3_hancockbookHancock received his PhD from London University, and for the last four decades has taught English and linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also the director of the Romani Archives and Documentation Center. Through his scholarship and activism he has successfully drawn attention to the centuries-long discrimination of the Romani and has helped to reassess the Romani identity within the Western world. He has represented the Romani people at the United Nations, served as a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, and is currently a state commissioner on the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. Hancock’s published works include The Pariah Syndrome, We are the Romani People, and most recently, Danger! Educated Gypsy.

While the Porrajmos has generated relatively few written records, ever more Holocaust victims HLHW2_bookcontinue to come forward with their stories. On Wednesday, May 14th, Ruth Kluger will read from her best-selling book, Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered. Kluger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis’ “model ghetto.” Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Kluger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Kluger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write.

This lecture is made possible by through the generosity of Phyllis and Dan Epstein. The lecturer will be introduced by UC San Diego history professor Frank Bless.

Please note times and locations: Parrajmos: The Romanis and the Holocaust will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room on the UC San Diego campus. Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered will take place in The Great Hall. Both lectures are from 5 – 7 pm. Driving and parking directions are available on the HLHW website.

An integral part of the Holocaust Living History Workshop is the Visual History Archive. The UC San Diego Library is one of only three university libraries on the West Coast to have access to the Archive, which is administered by the Shoah Foundation Institute at the University of Southern California. In addition to the over 52,000 original testimonies from Holocaust witnesses and survivors, additional video testimonies with survivors of the Nanjing massacre have recently been added. The testimonies are in the original Mandarin with English subtitles. Students and members of the public can access the Archive from any computer on the UC San Diego campus.

For more information about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact program coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://library.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Porrajmos: The Romanies and the Holocaust

ian_hancockThe Holocaust claimed anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million Romani lives, a tragedy the Romani people and Sinti refer to as the Porrajmos, or “the Devouring.” Notwithstanding the scope of the catastrophe, the Romani genocide has all too often been minimized or ignored. A Romani-born British citizen, activist, and scholar, Hancock has been instrumental in raising awareness about this tragedy. For the past four decades, he has been a professor of English and linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is the director of the Romani Studies program and the Romani Archives and Documentation Center. He has represented the Romani people at the United Nations, served as a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, and is currently a state commissioner on the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. At this special event Hancock will be introduced by Yale Strom, an expert in Jewish and Roma culture during and after the Holocaust.

Co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Department of Ethnic Studies

When: Wednesday May 7 2014, 5 pm     Where: UCSD Geisel Library Seuss room    Who: free and open to the public – refreshments served

Unveiling of Farmworker Movement Documentation Archive

UC San Diego Press Release

FarmworkersArchive_flyerFINAL

Thinking Big with Geoff Bowker

DesignLarge_April23FINAL

Mozart’s Humors: Cultural and Clinical Problems of Retrospective Diagnosis

MozartWas Mozart manic depressive or did he suffer from ADHD or OCD? Or, perhaps his restless movements and peculiar personality suggest a diagnosis of Tourette’s Syndrome or even autism? Since the genius musician’s death in the 18th century, more than 140 medical and neurobehavioral diagnoses have been attributed to Mozart, few of which were in the clinical lexicon during his lifetime. Dr. Henry Powell, Professor Emeritus of Pathology at UC San Diego, will examine the evidence in a talk at Geisel Library on May 8 and will shed light on the challenges inherent in retrospective neurobehavioral diagnoses.

 

The May 8 talk, which is free and open to the public, will take place in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library from 2 to 3:30 p.m.  For more information, contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758.

Earth Week DIY Makers Day

The Library and the Environmental Sustainability Group is hosting a DIY Makers Day celebrating Earth Week on campus, using sustainable, non-toxic, reusable, and recyclable materials. Maker stations include:

  • make your own cleaning supplies (be extra green and bring your own container!)
  • make your own button using recycled book covers
  • make boxes and bookmarks using recycled paper
  • DIY Bike Safety: Be Seen! Make your own reflective strips (bring your bag, backpack, jacket; dog harness).
  • plant a succulent
  • watch a demonstration of a 3D Printer (vegetable-based plastic!)

Participants will leave with a sample of a project and ideas to continue making eco-friendly products and reusing consumables on a daily basis!

Check out our educational resource tables on a smoke and tobacco free campus,  recycling, and the Roger’s Community Garden at UCSD (formerly the Neighborhood Community Garden).  RCG at UCSD is a student-led garden serving the UCSD and San Diego community. We are located on a quarter acre of land behind the Dance Building and La Jolla Playhouse. Our main purpose is to offer land to students, staff,  faculty, and alumni, to grow herbs, flowers, fruits and vegetables. Additionally, in pursuit of our overall mission, we are developing multiple other projects, such as composting programs, workshops on sustainable agriculture and nutrition, lectures and teach-ins on surrounding social justice issues, and an annual seminar jointly taught by RCG faculty advisors and students. As a student-led project, we strive to support the community that supports us, and give back to those who have given so much to us. We hope that through our efforts we can add a something special to our campus.

 

Tuesday, April 22nd
11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library

Refreshments will be served!
Open to the public!

Stay tuned for a contest featuring our 3D printer!  The winner will get to print something on our Makerbot Replicator 2! (Hint: find us on Facebook: The UC San Diego Library and the UCSD Geisel Library)

If you have questions, please contact Kimberly Schwenk (kschwenk@ucsd.edu)

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