Behind-the-Scenes Tour of Inland Empire Libraries on April 24

Smiley

A.K. Smiley Library Public Library

If you like books, libraries, architecture, and science fiction, you might want to sign up for an all-day tour Friday, April 24, with UC San Diego’s University Librarian, Brian Schottlaender, to visit some of the Inland Empire’s most spectacular libraries.

The tour will start at the A.K. Smiley Public Library in Redlands, an architectural gem and a designated historic landmark which opened in 1898. Participants will get a custom tour by Library director Don McCue and will learn about the Smiley’s rare and valuable materials from Special Collections director, Nathan Gonzales. This stop will include a visit to the Lincoln Memorial Shrine just next door.

Rivera

Rivera Library UC Riverside

From Redlands, the group will head to Riverside for an informal lunch at the amazing Mission Inn with Steve Mandeville-Gamble, UC Riverside’s university librarian. After lunch, participants will have time to explore the stunning and unusual Mission Inn before departing for the UC Riverside campus, and a tour of UC Riverside’s Special Collections & Archives. At UCR, library staff will share highlights of the collection, including the Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy, the largest publicly-accessible collection of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and utopian literature in the world.
The all-day excursion will begin with an 8:30 a.m. departure by coach from the Supercomputer Center on the UC San Diego campus, and will return at approximately 6 p.m. The fee to attend is $80 per person, which includes transportation, lunch, snacks, and gratuity. Seating is limited to 25 people!

To register, please contact Christina Continelli no later than Friday, April 17, 2015
at 858-534-1183, or ccontinelli@ucsd.edu.

 

“My Meditations End in Reverie”

Elizabeth Stringer Exhibition

An art installation, My Meditations End in Reverie, by UC San Diego student Elizabeth Stringer is now on display through May. The exhibition is divided into two parts, located in both the Seuss Room Foyer within Geisel Library and in the Biomedical Library Building entry.

With an educational background as a double major in Human Biology and Art Studio Practice, Stringer has found herself within a world of growing rationalism  in contemporary science and society. By allowing this mode of thinking to be the guide of passion, she investigates the poetic microcosm, a private world of self  that is able to incorporate and convey the many facets of the world within a singular moment, which is more specifically contained within the informative  lens of research.  Read more…

Categories: Events & Exhibits Tags: Comments: 0

April is National Poetry Month–Time to Read, Share, & Honor Poetry & Poets

April is National Poetry Month, a time when the Library honors the poetic spirit of our own community by providing a virtual space for people to share poetry. We honor and feature poets who are both published and unpublished, whose poems reflect all poetic styles. This is our second year in providing this virtual space for sharing poetry, and, like last year, we’ve already had another great response to this project. We want to thank all the poets who contributed video and audio clips of their work!

We will continue to post submissions throughout April, so if you are a poet or a poetry lover and want to contribute, please send us a video or an audio file (up to 10 minutes) of you either reading your own work, talking about your work, or reading the work of a poet who has inspired you. Send your submissions to the project’s creator, Christina Continelli at: ccontinelli@ucsd.edu.

 

Ndaba Sibanda

Ndaba_Sibanda-100x155

 

 

 

 

 

(click on the photo to hear the poem)

Ndaba Sibanda is a Zimbabwean-born writer. He hails from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe`s second largest city. In 2005 he authored an epic, Love O’clock. He has since contributed to more than twelve published books including such international anthologies as Poems For Haiti, A South African anthology, Snippets, Voices Of Peace, Black Communion, Ripples of Love, Lost Coast Review, Summer 2014: Vol. 5, No. 3, On the Rusk Issue Three (Volume 3), Emanations: Foray into Forever, World Healing ~ World Peace Volume I: a poetry anthology (World Healing ~ World Peace 2014) (Volume 1), Metaphor: Modern and Contemporary Poetry (Volume 1), East Coast Literary Review: Spring Edition 2014 and Eccentric Press Poetry Anthology (Volume I): Omni Diuersitas.
Ndaba’s poems, essays and short stories have appeared in many and different journals and magazines like: The Piker Press, Bricolage, The Dying Goose, Lost Coast Review, Magazine ,Whispering Prairie Press, Saraba Magazine,allAfrica.com, Jungle Jim, Outside In Literary & Travel Magazine ,The Metric, Unlikely Stories, Santa Fe Writers Project – SFWP Journal, Elohi Gadugi – Elohi Gadugi Journal,The Subterranean Quarterly,Miracle ,The Joker, Florida Flash, Fjords Review, storySouth, Annapurna Magazine, Festival Of Language, quiet Shorts, The African Street Writer, Poetry Potion.com, Books Live , Whispers, and Poetrysoup. His latest anthology, The Dead Must Be Sobbing was published in March 2013. Sibanda`s debut novel, Timebomb has been accepted for publication in the UK.
He believes “it is right to write, and that writing is his life and second wife”.  Currently he lives in Saudi Arabia.

 

Rachel Winchester

Rachel Winchester

 

 

 

 

(click on the photo to hear the poems)

Rachel Winchester is a San Diego native and a long time performance artist in the mediums of dance, theatre, and poetry. She is currently a Lecturer at the University of Idaho, where she strives to create interdisciplinary performance experiences for her students. Rachel Winchester reads two poems: “Onset/First Love” and “Meditation Study”

 

Amitabh Vikram Dwivedi

Vikram pic

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Professor Dwivedi reads two of his poems: Death and Ecstasy)

Amitabh Vikram Dwivedi is university faculty and assistant professor of linguistics at Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University, India; and author of two books on lesser known Indian languages: A Grammar of Hadoti and A Grammar of Bhadarwahi. As a poet, he has published around fifty poems in different anthologies, journals, and magazines worldwide. Until recently, his poem “Mother” has included as a prologue to Motherhood and War: International Perspectives (Eds.), Palgrave Macmillan Press. 2014.

 

Lois Roma-Deeley

Lois Roma-Deely

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click photo to hear poem)

Lois Roma-Deeley, winner of the Samuel T. Coleridge Literary Prize, is the author of three collections of poetry, Rules of Hunger, northSight and High Notes. Her third collection, High Notes, was chosen as a Paterson Poetry Prize Finalist. She has published in many national anthologies, including Villanelles (Pocket Poets Series). Further, her work has been featured in numerous literary journals including, Spillway, The Wallace Stevens Journal, Hamilton Stone Review, Bellingham Review, 5 AM, Artful Dodge, Water~Stone, and many others. She was named a 2012-2013 U.S. Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation and CASE.
www.loisroma-deeley.com

 

Alex Bosworth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click on photo for poem)

Alex Bosworth was born in San Diego in 1965. He began writing artistically in elementary school and has kept at it for forty years. His work has been influenced by Kurt Vonnegut and Edward Lear. Bosworth reads his work at coffeehouses and bookstores all over his hometown. He has been asked twice to read on behalf of San Diego Writers Ink at The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. A collection of his work, “Chip Chip Chaw” is available on Amazon.  The audio portion of the video on this link was recorded in The Loft at UCSD La Jolla in 2011.

 

Youssef Alaoui-Fdili

Youssef Alaoui-Fdili

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Youssef Alaoui-Fdili reads part of his book-length poem The Blue Demon, and another poem called The Eternal City of Mud )

Youssef Alaoui-Fdili is a Moroccan-American Latino. Most of his work can be understood as Magic Realism or Fabulist, due to prevailing themes of fantastical events taking place in ordinary circumstances. His family and heritage are an endless source of inspiration for his varied, dark, spiritual and carnal writings. He has an MFA in Poetics from New College of California. There, he studied Classical Arabic, Spanish Baroque and Contemporary Moroccan poetry. He is also well versed in the most dour and macabre literature of the 19th Century. His poems have appeared in Exquisite Corpse, Poems Niederngasse, Stark Raving Normal, 580 Split, Cherry Bleeds, Carcinogenic Poetry, Red Fez, Dusie Press, Rivet Magazine, and nominated for a Pushcart at Full of Crow. Youssef is an original creator of the East Bay literary arts festival “Beast Crawl.” youssefalaoui.tumblr.com

 

Jessica Goodfellow

Goodfellow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click photo to hear poem)

Jessica Goodfellow’s books are Mendeleev’s Mandala (Mayapple Press, 2015), The Insomniac’s Weather Report (Three Candles Press First Book Prize winner, reissued by Isobar Press, 2014), and the chapbook A Pilgrim’s Guide to Chaos in the Heartland (Concrete Wolf, 2006). Her work has been featured in Best New Poets, Verse Daily, and The Writer’s Almanac, and is forthcoming at Motionpoems. She has received the Chad Walsh Poetry Prize from the Beloit Poetry Journal. She lives in Japan. www.jessicagoodfellow.com/

 

Gloria Frym

gloriafrym

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click photo to hear poem, and interview with Gloria Frym)

Gloria Frym is a poet and fiction writer. Her most recent book is Mind Over Matter (BlazeVOX books, 2011) and prior to that she published the chapbook Any Time Soon (Little Red Leaves, 2010). Other works by Frym include The Lost Poems of Sappho (Effing Press, 2007) and Solution Simulacra(United Artists Books, 2006). A previous book of poems, Homeless at Home, won an American Book Award.

She is the author of several other volumes of poetry and two critically acclaimed short story collections: Distance No Object (City Lights Books) and How I Learned (Coffee House Press). She is twice a recipient of The Fund for Poetry Award, the Walter & Elise Haas Creative Work Fund Grant, the San Francisco State University Poetry Center Book Award, and several California Arts Council grants to teach poetry writing to jail inmates.

She has published numerous articles on literature, visual arts, and music. Her research and academic interests include international poetries; 19th century and modernist international fiction; Walt Whitman; Emily Dickinson; the short story; the poem in prose; and ungenrefied writing.

 

Rex Butters

Rex Butters

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click to hear poem)

Since 1976, longtime SoCal resident Rex Butters has published journalistic writings on sites and in magazines including BAM, Rapport, All About Jazz, Folk Works, the LA Free Press, and the Free Venice Beachhead. His poetry has appeared for over 25 years in such diverse journals as Caffeine, Brain Vomit, interbang, sic Vice and Verse, The Journal of Interdimensional Poetry, Yogi Times, Bad Haircut Quarterly, the Mas Tequila Review, and the Muse International Journal of poetry. His anthology credits include Cost of Freedom, The Revolutionary Poets Brigade, and forthcoming Writer’s Round Talk Show anthology. He writes and performs with the improvised music/funk/spoken word ensembles, Black Shoe Polish, and Rag & Bone, and sings and reads with various projects.

 

Tiffany Vakilian

Tiffany Monique

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click photo to hear poem)

Tiffany Vakilian has been writing since she was a small child. Her poetry has been published in multiple independent anthologies and journals, as well as www.timobe.com, her blog. Having earned her Masters in Transformative Language Arts from Goddard College, Tiffany continues her quest to use word-art as a facilitator of social commentary and change. In her first poetry book, Ugly Drawers, Pretty Panties Tiffany shares her verbal vignettes of dreams, experiences, perspectives and people. She s the quintessential Renaissance Gal- a member of ASCAP, The National Forensics League, and Transformative Language Arts Network.

 

“Germans in the Pacific World” Examines Influence of Explorers

Man Standing By Shore I

Germans in the Pacific World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, traces the trajectories of German explorers, missionaries, entrepreneurs, and others, who ventured into the Pacific to explore that ocean’s vast landmasses and numerous islands. The exhibit, which is on display in Geisel Library thru the end of spring quarter, depicts the myriad ways the German presence shaped the region’s history, and led to the creation of newly documented knowledge about the peoples, geography, fauna, and flora in and around the Pacific.

Germans in the Pacific World was curated by Professor Ulrike Strasser and graduate student Sky Johnston, of the UC San Diego History Department. The exhibit was mounted to coincide with an international symposium on “Germans in the Pacific World from the Late 17th to 20th Century,” which examined knowledge transfer from the early modern period through the 19th and 20th centuries.

Materials in the exhibit include early depictions and descriptions of California’s people, landscape, mineral riches, and animals, ranging from the first European map of the California peninsula produced in 1702, to the large atlas issued to accompany the Voyage de Humboldt et Bonpland, led by the famous German explorer, Alexander v. Humboldt.

Also included are texts and images associated with 19th and 20th century German travelers, colonialism, and racial science, as well as a volume on birds of California and the Sandwich Islands, the name given by Captain James Cook to the Hawaiian Islands. The book depicts the majestic white Pelican and other Pacific birds, which caught the attention of German zoologists and explorers.

Pelican I

Jellyfish I

 

California drew many German immigrants to its coast during and long after the Gold Rush. One such man, Paul Alexander, recounted his experiences and offered his views on California and its peoples in print. This volume of helpful information for prospective travelers and immigrants appeared in a series of handbooks pitched to Germans for one mark per volume. Earlier volumes included guides to Wisconsin, Argentina, and Canada, and an introduction to the English language. The Pacific coast was the new frontier. Accordingly, Alexander’s account of California was followed with a book on Oregon. As seen here, the volume was small enough for a traveler to carry on his person.

The Holocaust Living History Workshop presents: “Archival Footprints, in Search of the Grishavers”

Originally from Belgium, Herman Grishaver survived the war thanks to his family’s escape to the United States. Since retiring from his neurology practice, he has researched the fates of numerous family members during and after the Holocaust. His journey through archives on several continents has yielded surprising insights that take the audience from Antwerp to Linz and from Perpignan to Jerusalem. The result is a tapestry of stories woven from memories, images, and scraps of paper. Robert Nichols, a child refugee from Nazi Germany, will introduce Hermann Grishaver.

This event will take place Wednesday, March 11, 2015 in the Seuss Room of the Geisel Library from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

 

HLHW march 2015

Join Us March 2 for Dr. Seuss’s 111th Birthday Party!

20120223-SeusspartyJoin us Monday, March 2, when the UC San Diego campus once again celebrates the birthday of our favorite author, Theodor Seuss Geisel, otherwise known as Dr. Seuss. The party will kick off at noon in front of Geisel Library, and will include musical entertainment by Scott Paulson and The Teeny Tiny Pit Orchestra, playing tunes from The Cat in the Hat Songbook.

University Librarian Brian Schottlaender will be on hand to pass out cake and greet attendees, along with other University representatives.  Also, Hats Off to Dr. Seuss!, an exhibit of unique, historic hats from Ted Geisel’s personal collection, is now on display through March 22 in the public area of Geisel Library’s Special Collections & Archives. The hats are exhibited in a turn-of-the-century steamer trunk, also described as the “Hat Closet” and can be viewed during the week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on March 2 and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on other weekdays.

Categories: Events & Exhibits

Second annual VIP Study Room Contest!

VIPStudyRoom

Submit an original photo of the Library (interior or exterior, Geisel or BLB) to LearningSpaces@ucsd.edu using the subject line “VIP Study Room.”  You will be entered into a random drawing to win exclusive, 24-hour “VIP” use of a study room in the Geisel East Learning Commons (Room 2) from 10 am on Monday, March 16 until 10 am on March 17.  The winner will also receive eight guest passes to invite friends to bask in your VIP treatment and share the VIP gift basket of finals-themed necessities and study treats.

Fine Print

Those submitting photos must be current UCSD students.

  1. Include your full name in the email when submitting your photo.
  2. You may submit up to 10 separate photos (in a single or multiple emails).
  3. All submissions will become property of the UCSD Library and may be displayed, at the Library’s discretion, within the Library or on its website.
  4. Submissions must have been taken by the person submitting them for the contest.
  5. Photos should not include any identifiable persons who have not expressly provided their permission to be photographed for this purpose.

Photos will be accepted through noon on Tuesday, March 10.  The winner will be selected at random from all entries and notified on March 11.  Do not let this opportunity to be a Library celeb for a day pass you by.

#blacklivesmatter : a century of resistance to state-sanctioned violence

Exhibit:
On display February 2 – March 31, 2015
Geisel Library West, main floor
Open to all

Recently, the tragic deaths and failures of justice in the cases of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Eric Garner have captured headlines and sparked protests around the country. But for every widely publicized incident of racially motivated violence, hundreds go unreported or under-reported. The work of the Civil Rights movement, while far-reaching, remains incomplete.

To this day, territories of de facto segregation, practices such as stop and frisk, unreported police brutality, and other forms of racial oppression persist. Rather than “Judge Lynch” terrorizing black, poor, and minority populations, sources of violence are often state-legitimated, perpetuated by increasingly militarized police departments, practices such as racial profiling, brutal acts that go unchecked, and a court system that fails to mete out equal justice.

From the get-go, America’s promise of liberty and justice wasn’t really for all. But it’s an ideal we cling to. Throughout this country’s history, alongside incidents of racially motivated violence, injustice, and brutality, are the stories of those who resisted oppression, sometimes risking all by taking to the streets, the courts, and the legislatures to forward a vision of a fair and just society. Today we stand alongside those activists, continuing the work begun long ago, as we affirm that black lives matter.

Highlighting the library’s rich resources, materials have been gathered from our print and online collections to shed light on these issues.

 

Speaker Series Event:

Activism, Policing, and Black Lives Matter

12:00 – 1:30 pm, February 25, 2015
Seuss Room, Geisel Library building

Open to all. Refreshments will be served.

Join us for a conversation with four faculty: Zeinabu Davis (UCSD Communication), Dayo Gore (UCSD Ethnic Studies), Cesar Rodriguez  (CSUSM Sociology) and Daniel Widener (UCSD History).  This panel discussion raises questions, examines the roots of injustice, and offers avenues of exploration and information that might help to galvanize the outrage of recent protests into a sustained movement.

Categories: Events & Exhibits

Black History Month Events Kick off Feb. 3rd

The UC San Diego Library will join the campus in a month-long celebration of Black History Month on February 3, with an exhibit on “A Century of Black Life, History, and Culture” and “100 Rainbow Years,” in Geisel Library, co-sponsored with the African American & African Studies Research Center (AAASRC). The exhibit illustrates the intersections of families and communities evolving toward global social justice, cooperation, and universalism. According to AAASRC Director Benetta Jules Rosette, a professor of Sociology, Josephine Baker’s “Rainbow Tribe” was an inspiration, for the exhibit, which features historic images of the families of AAASRC Board members, who moved from slavery to freedom and from slave holders to promoters of social justice. The exhibit, will be on view through the end of month in Geisel West, 1st floor, demonstrates the patchwork of American and global societies over the last 100 years, and reflects AAASRC’s 20-year commitment to global human rights, justice, and cooperation.

BJR 14

 

 

 

 

On February 12, the Library and AAASRC will present “The Kansas City Style: A Marriage of Blues & Jazz with Jeannie Cheatham” at 3:30 p.m. in the Geisel Library Seuss Room. International jazz legend Jeannie Cheatham will give a presentation on Kansas City blues, featuring live music, engaging storytelling, and recently rediscovered video. Jeannie, who has been credited along with her late husband Jimmy Cheatham, will perform on piano with a jazz trio, underscoring the readings of special guests. Jeannie’s autobiography, Meet Me With Your Black Drawers On, documents her numerous collaborations with some of the great musicians of the past sixty years—including the big bands of Cab Calloway and Count Basie. Jeannie Cheatham, who played piano for these and other jazz icons, was trained in both the classical and famous Kansas City jazz traditions. Jeannie and Jimmy Cheatham, who headed up the UC San Diego Music Department’s jazz program for many years, toured the world with their Sweet Baby Blues Band. An exhibit on the Kansas City style, which will feature Jimmy Cheatham’s trombone, will also be on view in Geisel Library during the month of February.

BJR 9

Categories: Events & Exhibits

Another piece of the puzzle…

Have you taken the opportunity to work on the fun puzzles in the Library? If not, visit the East Learning Commons or the Reference area puzzle. Take time to enter the contest by completing a comment slip.

Completed Puzzle

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