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2016 Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

art feminism wiki

11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Saturday,  March 5, 2016
Geisel Library Classroom 2

This event is open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Click here to RSVP.

Hosted by the Library Diversity & Inclusion Committee.

Art+Feminism is a campaign to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well documented. In a 2011 survey, Wikimedia found that less than 13% of its contributors are female. The reasons for the gender gap are up for debate: suggestions include leisure inequality, how gender socialization shapes public comportment, and the contentious nature of Wikipedia’s talk pages. The practical effect of this disparity, however, is not. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. Many articles on notable women in history and art are absent on Wikipedia. This represents an alarming aporia in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge.

We will spend the time participating in a communal update session as we work together to improve and add Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism.

If you’re inexperienced – that’s ok! Tutorials will be provided for the beginner Wikipedian, along with reference materials and refreshments. There are Windows computers available in the library computer lab, but feel free to bring your laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation. For the editing-averse, we urge you to stop by to show your support.

Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21

faculty_victorOn February 24, the University of California, San Diego Library will sponsor Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21, featuring climate change policy expert David Victor and students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who attended COP21, and will provide their insights on the process and the outcome. The event is free and open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library.

David Victor, a professor of international relations at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy & Strategy, has been a participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) proceedings since the IPCC’s inception, and was a party to the negotiations in Paris. School of Global Policy and Strategy students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who accompanied Victor at the Paris talks, were part of the large UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography delegation, and helped to advocate for an increased recognition of the role of oceans in the new climate. Victor, who has been an astute observer of and an active contributor to climate change negotiations since the late 1980s, believes there are very specific reasons why COP21, while not without its flaws, was more productive than any climate negotiations in the last 20 years.

Victor, co-director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, is the author of Global Warming Gridlock, his 2011 book which argued that a “radical rethinking” of global warming policy was needed in order to make international law more effective in bringing about international compacts to reduce global emissions. The Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21), held in December 2015, employed the “bottom-up approach” Victor advocated in his book, producing an international agreement that sets both short and long term targets for reducing emissions worldwide. Last year, Victor also wrote a paper for the journal, Nature, which pushed for a more streamlined and less constricted focus that would better integrate the social sciences in the climate change policy process, to more effectively address related social, political, and psychological issues. Read more…

Event Featuring Climate Change Policy Expert David Victor

55_David Victor

February 24, 2016 at 5:30 p.m.

Seuss Room, Geisel Library

Free and Open to the Public

Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21, will feature climate change policy expert David Victor, professor of international relations at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy & Strategy and GPS students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who participated in COP21, and will provide their insights on the process and the outcome. Victor has been a participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) proceedings since the IPCC’s inception, and was a party to the negotiations in Paris. Victor, co-director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, is the author of Global Warming Gridlock, his 2011 book which argued that a “radical rethinking” of global warming policy was needed in order to make international law more effective in bringing about international compacts to reduce global emissions.

Due to construction on the road that provides direct access to Geisel Library, we encourage visitors to park in the Hopkins Parking Structure located on the corner of Hopkins Lane and Voight Drive. You will need to purchase a Visitor Premium (VP) Permit at a pay station near the entrance. For more information on the cost of parking permits, restrictions, and more, click here. Then follow the pedestrian signage from the parking structure to the Library.

For more information contact Mariah Fellows at mfellows@ucsd.edu or 858-534-0533.

Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire

Join the Library for a discussion and book signing with Mark Hanna, Historian & Author of Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Faculty Club, The Lounge

Light refreshments will be served.

Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire_LARGEMark Hanna is an associate professor of History at UC San Diego, and one of the nation’s top authorities on pirates. Hanna is the author of the new book, Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire (2015, University of North Carolina Press). In his book, he sheds a fresh light on pirates, traditionally depicted as fearless adventurers on the high seas. He examines the crucial role that pirates played on land by contributing to the commercial and economic development of port towns in early America and the British Empire. Hanna’s earlier work, The Pirate’s Nest: The Impact of Piracy on Newport and Charles Town, 1670-1740, challenged prevailing interpretations of piracy and also harnessed the phenomenon of piracy to illuminate the history of early America in the Atlantic world.

This event is free and open to the public. No registration is required. For more information, contact Mariah Fellows at mfellows@ucsd.edu or 858-534-0533. For directions and parking information, click here.

Chair Massages for students

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The Zone’s Relaxation & Rescue Squad will again provide chair massages in Geisel Library each Monday evening in Winter term, except on February 1.  The massages will be offered in the Academic Partnership Cubicle in the East Commons, in addition to alternating between the West Commons, the Media Desk area, and the Brody Space, as noted below.

  • January 11:  West Commons (2nd Floor) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • January 25:  Brody Space  (1st Floor Southwest) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • February 8:  Media Desk area  (1st Floor West) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • February 22:  West Commons (2nd Floor) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • February 29:  Brody Space  (1st Floor Southwest) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • March 7:  Media Desk area (1st Floor West) & East Commons (2nd Floor)

 

Virtual Victoriana: Roots of 3-D

Holmes_stereoscope

A Holmes stereoscope from the 19th century.

Attendee of the 2015 Google I/O conference inspects Google Cardboard. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stereoscopic devices of the 1800’s were used for entertainment and educational purposes. Flat postcard images of exotic locales and architectural wonders were transformed into three-dimensional visits via elegant hand-held stereoscopes. These simple devices are not unlike the cardboard Google glasses that were recently distributed by the New York Times. Important 20th century tools such as 3-D arial maps are directly related to these Victorian diversions.

See these old and new tools at a small exhibit at the UC San Diego Library (Geisel West, 2nd floor) through March 2016.

The exhibit includes stereoscopic books of interest from the Library’s circulating collection, tracing current virtual surgery and modern 3-D motion pictures back to these earliest novelties. Devices on display are simple but effective: original and re-issued stereoscopes, Google glasses, old-school 3-D glasses, early Bakelite “view-masters” and, of course, many Victorian Era stereoscopic postcards.

For more information, contact Scott Paulson at 858-822-5758 or spaulson@ucsd.edu.

What’s Climate Change To You?

What's Climate Changepic

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Events Room, Biomedical Library Building

Light refreshments will be served.

Join us as Dr. Bruce Bekkar, a UC San Diego alumnus and a member of Doctors for Climate Health with the American Lung Association, discusses how climate change is affecting human health, and what we can do to prevent a climate crisis.

Dr. Bekkar just recently left his San Diego medical practice to devote his time to local and global environmental issues. Last spring, he completed Climate Reality Leadership Training, which included instruction from Vice President Al Gore and some of the nation’s leading climate scientists.

“Having been a physician for nearly 30 years not only helps me to understand the risks that a destabilized climate poses to life on earth, but it also gives me the authority and access to the audiences that  need to hear this message,” said Bekkar. “Put another way, as an obstetrician, I worked to preserve human life and helped new ones get started. As a climate activist, I’m working to preserve human health and to preserve nature, which is necessary for our survival as well as our happiness.”  Read more…

Geisel Library Exhibit Sheds Light on Chinese Workers Who Built Transcontinental Railway

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Chinese work group for the Great Northern Railway, c. 1909. (Photo courtesy of Royal British Columbia Museum)

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental, produced by the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford University, is on display through February 29, 2016 in Geisel Library on the University of California, San Diego campus. The exhibit tells the undocumented story of thousands of Chinese migrants, who played an instrumental role in the construction of the nation’s first transcontinental railway in the 1860s.

In addition to the partnership with the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford, the Chinese American Library Association’s Task Force on Chinese Railroad Workers, which seeks to increase awareness and appreciation for the contributions of Chinese Americans, helped to bring the exhibit to the campus.

A reception will be held on Friday, January 22, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library, to celebrate the opening of the exhibit at the UC San Diego Library, the first institution to host the exhibit after its debut last summer at Stanford University and the Chinese Historical Society of America. The reception will include remarks from: Hilton Obenzinger, associate director of the Chinese Railroad Workers Project and a Lecturer in American Studies & English at Stanford University; Simeon Man, a scholar of Asian American Studies and an assistant professor in UC San Diego’s Department of History; and Murray Lee, Curator of Chinese American History for the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum. The event is free and open to the public. To make a reservation, please visit: http://lib.ucsd.edu/ironroadRead more…

Campus “Portraits” Now Deck the Walls of Geisel Library

IMG_1625The previously unadorned walls leading to the East Learning Commons in Geisel Library are now colorful and vibrant thanks to local artist, Paula McColl. McColl, who resides in La Jolla, recently painted some of the UC San Diego campus’ most distinctive buildings and settings, including Geisel Library, the Revelle College Fountain, and the Scripps bridge. While her campus paintings debuted at the Faculty Club this past summer, a selection of her oil paintings will continue to grace the walls of Geisel through winter quarter.

A native of Zanesville, Ohio, McColl graduated with a BA in Art History/Studio Art from Hunter College in New York City. After college, she exhibited her work at the Edward Throp Gallery in New York before moving to Brazil, where Sao Paulo’s Museum of Modern Art held an exhibition of her paintings,  Duas Cidades, Sao Paulo e Nova York. The one-woman show included paintings of the cityscapes of these two major cities.  Read more…

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