Big Passion for Tiny Music: Library’s Toy Piano Festival Returns with New Works Sept. 5 & 10

Posted On: August 15, 2017

What do teeny-tiny pianos and the Cat in the Hat Songbook have in common? They are part of this year’s Toy Piano Festival

The popular fest, now in its 17th year, will feature two performances this fall, the first at Geisel Library in the Seuss Room on September 5 at noon, and a special collaboration with the San Diego Public Library on Sunday, September 10 at 2:30 pm in the Neil Morgan Auditorium. 

Join festival director Scott Paulson and his toy piano colleagues Sue Palmer, Andrea Wingen, Kenneth Herman, Ryoko Amadee Goguen, Samara Rice, Christian Hertzog and Alex Segal for a performance that will amuse listeners of all ages. 

Since 2000, the UC San Diego Library has hosted the Toy Piano Festival every September, to pay homage to the September 5 birthday of John Cage, the first composer to write a serious work for toy pianos. In May of 2001, the Library of Congress issued a subject heading and call number for toy piano scores, at the request of Paulson, the Toy Piano Collection, and the events at Geisel Library. The call number is: M 175 T69.

The toy piano collection at Geisel Library consists of commissioned scores, literature and recordings, and actual toy pianos, ranging from simple four-note novelty keyboards to three-octave baby grands. A selection of toy piano scores and instruments will be on stage at the San Diego Public Library event.

Both performances are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758.

 

“Silents Under the Stars” Provides Unique Film Experience

Posted On: August 14, 2017

Join us Saturday, August 26 for an outdoor film screening of the 1922 silent movie The Electric House starring Buster Keaton and the 1923 short film It’s a Gift. 

The films feature live music and sound effects by the Library’s very own Scott Paulson.

Both films explore early Hollywood’s fascination with mechanisms and inventions wreaking havoc to comic effect. The event takes place on the front lawn of Wisteria Cottage at La Jolla Historical Society.

Bring low chairs and a picnic dinner for a fun evening under the stars! The lawn opens at 7:00 pm and films start at 8:00 pm.

In addition, the evening will include footage filmed for a documentary of Balboa Park’s 1915-16 Panama California Exposition titled A Glimpse of the San Diego Exposition,  as well as Fatty Arbuckle and Mabel Normand careening down the Prado in a madcap electric car in Fatty and Mabel at the San Diego Expo. 

Silents Under the Stars is a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the La Jolla Historical Society.

UC San Diego Dinner in the Library to Feature International Best-Selling Author Ann Patchett on Sept. 8

Posted On: August 10, 2017

Set in iconic Geisel Library, fundraiser will support growth of ‘smart’ learning spaces

She first took the world by storm as an international best-selling author. Then, she became known as a fierce champion of the corner bookstore, those nearly extinct havens for bibliophiles who cherish the opportunity to talk about and be around books. Ann Patchett will share her remarkable life and work as a New York Times bestselling author, independent bookstore owner and literary advocate on Friday, Sept. 8, as part of the University of California San Diego’s Dinner in the Library, an annual benefit to support the UC San Diego Library.

“An Evening with Ann Patchett” will take place in UC San Diego’s iconic Geisel Library building from 6-9:30 p.m. All proceeds will support the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative, an initiative to transform and revitalize the interior public spaces of Geisel Library. Because of the significance of the initiative to student learning and the campus overall, Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla will match gifts raised up to $1 million, doubling the impact of donations.

“Support from Dinner in the Library makes an incredible impact on our ability to sustain and grow the UC San Diego Library as a hub of discovery and learning for our campus and community,” said Chancellor Khosla. “As the intellectual heart of our university, the Library helps spark the groundbreaking work of our faculty and students, whose breakthroughs make waves across the globe.”

Patchett is the author of seven highly acclaimed novels, including Bel Canto, which received the Orange Prize and the prestigious PEN/Faulkner Award, as well as Commonwealth, State of Wonder and The Magician’s Assistant. She has also written three books of nonfiction, including Truth & Beauty, What Now? and This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. She has received numerous awards and fellowships, from the Book Sense Book of the Year to a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Harold D. Vursell Memorial Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Read more…

What Do You Think? Exhibit

Posted On: June 14, 2017

View of canvases on wall where students posted their op-eds

What Do You Think?
Geisel Library building, main floor, west wing

At a time when media are being discredited as purveyors of “fake news” and labeled as “the enemy of the people”, it is critical to remember the importance of fact-based civic debate for our democracies.  The “What Do You Think?” exhibit was created by students in Professor Fernando Dominguez Rubio’s Communication 10: Communication and Democracy class this past Spring Quarter. What you see here is a wall filled with students’ voices defending their arguments and political views on issues as diverse as media bias, gender equality, election results and racial discrimination.  This wall is a demonstration that it is possible to hold strong views and generate civic discourse based on facts, reasons, and arguments, rather than on accusations, falsities, and insults.

We invite you to read the wall and we challenge you to contribute to the conversation by leaving your own responses. Join the conversation!

The exhibit is located in the Geisel Library building, main floor, west wing.

East Commons Stress Free Zone Is Open During Finals Week

Posted On: June 7, 2017

At the end of each quarter the UC San Diego Library hosts the Stress Free Zone to facilitate relaxation and provide snacks during first three days of finals week. Join us on June 12, 13, and 14 in the East Commons (Floor 2) from 7:00 – 9:00 pm (or until the food is gone). Audrey’s Café is partnering with the Library to provide free coffee to students in addition to the Library’s snacks and fresh fruit assortment. While coffee and snacks will be served only at night, de-stressing activities are available all day in the East Commons. Visit library.ucsd.edu/spaces/places-to-study/de-stress/ for more details. In addition to the permanent installations of the walk stations, chess, Quoridor, and scrabble gaming tables, the Library has foam rollers to stretch muscles and to help release tension.

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist Eric Lichtblau to Discuss “The Nazis Next Door”

Posted On: May 22, 2017

When World War II came to a close in 1945, the U.S. Government recruited a few leading German scientists, who it judged could contribute to America’s space and military programs. In addition, the rationale was that if the government hadn’t done this, these top scientists, along with their scientific knowledge and military secrets, would have been swept up by the Soviet Union. Journalist Eric Lichtblau, uncovers a series of much more disconcerting findings in his 2014 book, The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men, which reveals that the U.S. allowed approximately 10,000 Nazis—some of whom were directly involved in heinous and genocidal acts—to immigrate and take up residence in the U.S.

Lichtblau, a veteran investigative reporter with CNN, will be the featured speaker at the Wednesday, June 7 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW), a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program. The June 7 event is sponsored by William & Michelle Lerach, and will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Price Center East Ballroom on the UC San Diego campus. The event is free and open to the public, and will be preceded by a 4:30 p.m. reception. Reservations must be made in advance; to reserve tickets click here.

Investigative Journalist, Eric Lichtblau

Lichtblau recently joined CNN, as a member of its investigative team, where he has been a lead reporter covering recent events related to the Trump campaign, its ties to Russia, and the recent firing of FBI Director James Comey. Before joining CNN’s Washington bureau, Lichtblau was a reporter for The New York Times, where he has covered national security, money-and-politics, law enforcement, and other national issues, since 2002. Previously, he spent 15 years as an investigative and legal affairs reporter at the Los Angeles Times. Lichtblau has been the recipient of numerous awards for his work, and in 2006, he won the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting—with James Risen—for breaking the story of the secret wiretapping program authorized by President Bush, weeks after the September 11 attacks. The story and follow-up articles triggered a national debate about the balance between national security and civil liberties, and led to a rewriting of federal intelligence law. He has also written investigative pieces on political corruption scandals, the Wikileaks files, and the Edward Snowden-NSA revelations. Read more…

Genre and Theory: Strategies Toward Better Writing and Publishing in the Current Environment

Posted On: May 16, 2017

Please join us for a lecture with Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director of Duke University Press and director of the Intellectual Publics Program at City University of New York (CUNY). Mr. Wissoker will discuss changes in publishing and the academy, how to navigate them and will outline how to write a scholarly book. In addition, he will explore the many differences between research presented in dissertation form versus a book and share concrete tips on making changes in form, style, content, and intended audience.

Monday, May 22, 2017

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Ken Wissoker

Ken Wissoker, a renowned editor in scholarly publishing, is a noted speaker and consultant on all aspects of academic publishing and the contemporary intellectual landscape. He has been involved in the publishing industry since 1979 and has been Editorial Director at Duke University Press since 1997. In the fall of 2014 he also joined the CUNY Graduate Center as director of their new “Intellectual Publics” program. At CUNY Ken presents public conversations that facilitate thinking and debate across the disciplines while continuing in his role at Duke University Press.

This lecture is free and open to the public and sponsored by the UC San Diego Ethnic Studies Department, the UC San Diego Library, the UC San Diego Institute for Arts and Humanities, and the UC San Diego Anthropology Department.

For more information contact Mariah Fellows at mfellows@ucsd.edu.

Library Partners with OMA to Exhibit Works by Artist Ted Meyer

Broken Back; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

Posted On: May 11, 2017

A sampling of the works from artist Ted Meyer’s intriguing Scarred for Life series will be on display, beginning May 15 through September 1, 2017, in the Biomedical Library Building breezeway. The exhibit and an opening reception on May 15 are a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and Oceanside Museum of Art, which is holding a major exhibition of the artist’s work—Ted Meyer: Scarred for Life— from May 27 through September 17, 2017.

At the May 15 reception, Ted Meyer will talk about his work and some of the fascinating human stories behind it. Members and staff from Oceanside Museum of Art will also be in attendance and will discuss the OMA exhibition. The event is free and open to the public and will be held on Monday, May 15 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Biomedical Library Building.

Ted Meyer is a nationally recognized artist, curator and patient advocate, who helps patients, students, and medical professionals see the positive, in the worst life can offer. Meyer’s personal experience with Gaucher Disease, a rare genetic disorder that he was born with, has served as his artistic motivation in creating his 18-year project “Scarred for Life: Mono-prints of Human Scars.” In his work, he chronicles the trauma and courage of people who have lived through serious accidents and health crises. Those stories are told through graphic, yet beautiful depictions of people’s suddenly altered bodies and the resulting scars. Meyer’s artistically-enhanced monoprints—taken directly from scarred skin— are accompanied by a photographic portrait and a written story by his subject. Each tells a unique and intriguing story of resilience and healing.

Brain Cancer; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

Meyer, whose art has been displayed at museums and other venues both nationally and internationally, is currently the Artist in Residence at the USC Keck School of Medicine, where he curates exhibitions of artwork by patients. The portraits of patients are incorporated into the medical school’s curriculum, teaching future doctors to see their patients as complex human beings.

UC San Diego Library contact: Scott Paulson, spaulson@ucsd.edu.

More information about the artist: tedmeyer.com.

More information about Oceanside Museum of Art exhibition: oma-online.org/meyer.

Register today for the June 7 Holocaust Living History Workshop with Eric Lichtblau

Posted On: May 3, 2017

Scarred For Life: An Exhibition of Works by Ted Meyer

Posted On: April 27, 2017

Biomedical Library Exhibition

May 15, 2017 – July 31, 2017    Biomedical Library Building, 1st floor Breezeway

Opening Reception with Artist Ted Meyer

Monday, May 15, 2017     3:00 – 5:00 PM    Biomedical Library Building

“It isn’t just a scar. It’s my scar”

After years of doing work about his own rare illness, and becoming bored by his personal situation, artist Ted Meyer changed focus and began visually telling the stories of other people who have been through major traumas. For more than 16 years Meyer has been creating a graphic yet beautiful depiction of people’s suddenly altered bodies and the resulting scars in an ever-enlarging collection of artworks entitled, Scarred for Life.

Brain Cancer; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

Scarred for Life continues to grow and now consists of nearly 100 artistically enhanced monoprints taken directly from the scarred skin of his subjects. Each image – accompanied by a photographic portrait taken by Ted and a written story by his subject – tells a unique and intriguing story of medical crisis, resilience and healing. The resulting, ever-expanding presentation of mono-prints, narratives, and photographs has been exhibited nationally and received press coverage in such publications as the New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, as well as NPR and PBS. This exhibition was most recently on display at Saint John the Divine in New York City and National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring Maryland.

The opening reception at the Biomedical Library is free and open to the public. No RSVP required. For more information about the event, please contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu.

Open heart surgery at one month – ventricle septic defect; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

A related exhibit of the artist’s work will be on display at the Oceanside Museum of Art from May 27 – September 17, 2017. For more information, visit oma-online.org/meyer.

For more information about the artist, visit tedmeyer.com.

Please Note: All visitors to the UC San Diego campus are required to display a valid parking pass. The closest parking to the Biomedical Library is the Gilman parking structure. More information about parking on campus.

 

 

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