Library Tours, Summer 2018

Get to know Geisel! Schedule your tour today for Summer 2018.

These tours showcase the wide variety of study spaces, library collections, technologies, equipment, and amenities offered within Geisel Library, and offer an introduction to the many services its staff provide. Services and spaces offered in the nearby Biomedical Library Building are also mentioned. Tours are approximately 45-60 minutes. Visit lib.ucsd.edu/tours for more information.

Geisel Library Exhibits Focus on Civil Rights Era’s Impact

 

Photo by: Spider Martin, National Archives.

John Lewis: #GoodTrouble
June 2018
Exhibit, Geisel Library, main floor, west wing
Digital Exhibit, Geisel Library, main floor, east wing

“Sometimes you have to get in trouble–good trouble, necessary trouble–to make a way out of no way.” – John Lewis

Georgia Congressman John Lewis has been a longtime advocate for civil and human rights. His story starts in rural Alabama where he honed his preaching skills by preaching to his chickens. In college, he helped organize sit-ins in Nashville. Students occupied lunch counters and Freedom Riders rode interstate buses through the South, risking their lives to test new anti-segregation laws. In 1963 he was the youngest speaker at the March on Washington. In 1965, Lewis was front and center on the Edmund Pettus Bridge on “Bloody Sunday” when Alabama state troopers attacked folks peacefully marching from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

This activism leads to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Lewis has served as U.S. Representative of Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District since 1986 where he continues to be a supporter for justice and non-violent protest. More recently he has been a strong advocate for immigration policy reform and gun safety legislation.

The Library created two exhibits to highlight his long-standing commitment to activism. The exhibits include materials from Lewis’ March trilogy, as well as materials from the library’s collection on the Civil Rights Movement.

UC San Diego Library Launches Food for Fine$ Drive, Waiving Library Fines for Food Donations

Food for Fine$ 
Sunday, May 27- Saturday, June 9 
Geisel Library & Biomedical Library buildings

Bring food items to donate to either Library Front Desk between May 27 to June 9 (Weeks 9 & 10) for $2 per item off your library fines from Spring Quarter. All donated items go to UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry.

Guidelines

  • Fines eligible  for dismissal include course reserve and recall overdues, billing fees, and processing fees (no replacement charges)
  • Fines must be from the current term: Spring Quarter Weeks 1-8
  • Earn credits to a maximum of $40
  • Fines already paid may be credited
  • Food donations accepted at Geisel & BLB Front Desks
  • Small, individually-wrapped items in a larger bundle will count as one item (e.g. fruit cups in 4-pack)

Most Needed Items

  • Cereal, oatmeal, rice, pasta/sauce
  • Canned meats (tuna, chicken, ham)
  • Dry or canned beans
  • Peanut butter or granola bars
  • Canned soup or cooking oils
  • Canned fruits or vegetables

Read more…

Learning to Curate History: Arts & Humanities Undergraduates Explore the Library’s Special Collections & Archives

By Anthony King

UC San Diego Arts and Humanities undergraduates explore Geisel Library archives, presenting exhibits on Tijuana tourism and South Pacific expeditions

A selection from the Tijuana Photograph Postcard Collection, Special Collections & Archives, UC San Diego Library

Have you ever wanted to curate your own museum exhibit? Three students from the UC San Diego Division of Arts and Humanities got the chance to develop their own exhibitions, culled from material housed at the UC San Diego Library.

The students participated in the very first, two-quarter undergraduate curating course: independent study opportunities made available by the Institute of Arts and Humanities and the Library’s Special Collections & Archives. The curating project culminated in two exhibitions currently on display at Geisel Library, on the main floor leading to the Seuss Room.

“We are tremendously excited by our very first two exhibits because it not only provided a tactile practical experience for our undergraduate curators, but they have been able to teach the UC San Diego community something new and exciting about the past,” said Mark Hanna, a professor in the Department of History and associate director of the Institute of Arts and Humanities. “I enjoy watching students explore the exhibits each time I go to the library.”  Read more…

UC San Diego Library’s ‘Food for Fine$’ Program Waives Overdue Fees for a Good Cause

The UC San Diego Library is teaming up with the UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry to offer students a unique alternative to paying recall or reserve library fines with nonperishable food donations.

In support of the food pantry, the Library’s Food for Fine$ is a new initiative encouraging students to offer food donations to receive a $2 credit per eligible item toward their existing fines for recent overdue Library materials.

“This initiative demonstrates the Library’s commitment to the UC San Diego community by providing needed relief to some students who might otherwise skip a meal to save money,” said Kymberly Goodson, program director for Spaces, Lending, & Access (SLA). “We’re thrilled about this partnership with the Food Pantry. It’s something we’ve never done at the Library, and we hope we can continue it in the future.”

To participate, students can drop off nonperishable foods at the Geisel or BLB Front Desks, including canned meats, canned vegetables, boxes of cereal, cooking oils, and much more (see details of eligible donations and fines here). No glass containers will be accepted and food cannot be repackaged, damaged, opened, or expired. Food for Fine$ kicks off May 27 and runs through June 9.

“Only fines incurred in Weeks 1 through 8 of Spring Quarter will be credited by donated goods, up to a $40 maximum,” said Goodson. “Alternately, participants can receive a credit for already paid fines from this time period.”

The UC San Diego Library joins a network of other universities with similar programs, such as UC Irvine Libraries, U-T at Arlington, and Texas A&M. Food for Fine$ originated in public libraries as a way to further contribute to their communities while also providing a way for library users to decrease or pay their fines and begin using their library cards again.

“We’ve seen an increase in students using the pantry as tuition costs rise. We currently serve over 700 students per week. A 2012 UC Undergraduate Experience Survey showed 25 percent of UC San Diego students ‘often’ skip meals to save cash,” said Sherlock Li, manager at the Triton Food Pantry. “With summer around the corner, Food for Fine$ is a great way for students to clear their cupboards before moving out and keep the Food Pantry stocked.”

The Triton Food Pantry was launched by Associated Students in February 2015 to ensure the academic success of students of all backgrounds. All registered students with a valid UC San Diego identification card can visit the pantry once per week to get up to 10 points worth of food. Fresh produce is also available to supplement students’ needs.”

For more information about the Food for Fine$ program, contact staff at either the Geisel or BLB Front Desks.

Tech Lending Program

Forget your phone or laptop charger?  Need a camera for your class project?

Can’t find a video adapter to connect your laptop?

 

TLP side2TLP side3TLP side4

 

Stop by the Geisel Library Media Desk in 1st floor west to checkout our collection of cables, chargers, cameras, and other tech tools.

A full list of items is available on our website, or by searching “tech lending” in Roger.

Send questions, suggestions, and comments to LSPtech@ucsd.edu.

UC San Diego Library Wraps Up Holocaust Living History Workshop Lecture Series May 30



Join us for the last installment of the 2017-2018 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) with Eva Clarke on Wednesday, May 30 from 5-7 p.m. in the Seuss Room. This event is free and open to the public.

Eva Clarke

What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Clarke was one of three “miracle babies” who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva’s chances of survival were extremely slim. Against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK and settled in Cardiff. Nowadays, Eva regularly talks to audiences, and her remarkable story has been featured in the British and American media. She and her mother are among the protagonists of Wendy Holden’s book “Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance, and Hope.”

Every year the popular HLHW invites high-caliber speakers to campus to share inspiring stories that broaden our understanding of the past, foster tolerance and preserve the memories of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. This year we heard from individuals such as international lawyer Philippe Sands and POLIN Museum’s curator Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.

If you missed the opportunity to attend a workshop, you can watch recordings of selected talks for research through the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections and UCTV.

2018 Global Accessibility Awareness Fair

computer monitor, mouse, papers scattered on messy desk

Global Accessibility Awareness Fair
Thursday, May 17, 2018 • 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Hosted by: The Library Diversity & Inclusion Committee

 

Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) happens annually on the third Thursday in May. The purpose of GAAD is to get everyone talking, thinking and learning about digital access and inclusion. GAAD started in 2011 as a way for web developers to educate themselves and others about how to create web pages that are accessible to people with disabilities and has since become an international initiative with events around the globe. While people may be interested in the topic of making technology accessible and usable by persons with disabilities, the reality is that they often do not know how or where to start. Awareness comes first.

Join us for the Global Accessibility Fair where we will have different stations to learn more about digital accessibility, including:

  • Virtual Reality experiences to simulate audio and visual disabilities
  • Practice navigating webpages without a mouse
  • Computer demos of screenreaders and voice-recognition software
  • Informational tables

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

A New Reality: A Vision of Hope for a World in Transition


A New Reality: A Vision of Hope for a World in Transition

A Discussion & Book Signing with Psychiatrist Jonathan Salk
Thursday, May 24 • 5:30-7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Free admission, RSVP recommended.

In the new book, “A New Reality: Human Evolution for a Sustainable Future,” Jonathan Salk and co-author David Dewane take a look at the problems presented by population growth and changing human values. The book is a revised version of an earlier publication Jonathan wrote with his father, visionary scientist Jonas Salk, who developed the polio vaccine.

More than 40 years ago, Jonas Salk understood that we are at a unique moment in the history of humankind. Population growth has begun to slow and is trending toward equilibrium. This change is accompanied by an equally significant change in human values — a shift from those based on the unlimited availability of resources, unremitting growth, excess, independence, competition and short-term thinking to those based on limits, balance, interdependence, cooperation and long-term thinking. This transition is the source of the far-reaching tension and conflict happening in the world today.

Salk argues the way through this difficult time is to understand its basis and to focus on new values that will be of the greatest benefit both to individuals and humankind. He adds with population equilibrium societies are more focused on cooperation rather than individual excesses and are in harmony with nature.

“A New Reality” delivers a message of both caution and hope. Readers across the social and political spectrum will find it a reasoned and balanced counterpoint to current social and political trends. Its elegant design and perspective will appeal to general readers, policymakers, millennials, baby boomers, teachers and students, filling a need for a work of positivity and wisdom in otherwise bleak times.

This event is free and open to the public.

HERSTORY: The Legal History of Chinese-American Women

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