Film Screening: Chicano Legacy

Chicano mural at UC San Diego

Film Screening: Chicano Legacy
 Monday, April 23, 2018
12:00 – 1:00 pm

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Join us to view this short documentary on the power of students to make change. The Chicano Legacy Mural was commissioned at UC San Diego in 2011 as a response to racist incidents on campus. The film explores how the first ever permanent, minority inspired public artwork on campus has inspired students and its impact on campus life.

The screening will be followed by a Q & A with the filmmakers Horacio Jones and Jorge Mariscal.

Open to the public. All are welcome.
Refreshments will be served.

Hosted by the Library Diversity & Inclusion Committee.
For more information, please contact Gayatri Singh,

2018 DIY Makers’ Day

DIY Maker's Day

DIY Makers’ Day
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

The Library Sustainability Committee is hosting a DIY Makers’ Day celebrating Earth Month on campus, using sustainable, non-toxic, reusable, and recyclable materials.

Maker stations include:

  • Make your own cleaning supplies (be extra green and bring your own container!)
  • Make your own button using recycled book covers
  • Make your own body sugar scrub or deodorant (be extra green and bring your own container!)
  • Plant a succulent
  • Pledge how you plan on going green in the upcoming year

Participants will leave with samples of projects and ideas to continue making eco-friendly products and reusing consumables on a daily basis! Bring a totebag to help carry your materials.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

For questions or more information, please contact Kim Kane,

Let there be Power

Student feedback concerning electrical dead zones has been addressed with the addition of more power towers. Areas of focus include: Geisel Library 6th floor, Geisel Library East and West Commons, and the Biomedical Library.

VIP Study Room Contest

What would you do to have the exclusive use of a group study room for 24 hours? Well, the opportunity to win prime real-estate during finals week is the VIP Study Room Contest.

Do you have something on your mind? Write us a micro-flash fiction story. Think efficiency of text, brief vivid word pictures, and encapsulated thoughts. Challenge your ability to create precise phrasing.

Send us your 6-word, library-related FLASH FICTION story for a chance to win exclusive, 24-hour use of Geisel Study Room 2 from 10am March 19 to 10am on the 20th, 8 guest passes, and a study-themed gift basket.

Contest Rules

  • Stories should be 6 words and library-related
  • Submit as many stories as you like for additional chances to win
  • Submit here or email submissions to by March 14
  • Winner must be a current UCSD student; include college & major below or in the email
  • Multiple entries accepted per person; each enters you in the contest
  • Submissions may be used in Library publicity; winner to be notified March 14


Special Collections & Archives’ Ledger Art Books Serve as Hands-On Learning Tool for Graduate Students


“Driving the Horses” plate from the Koba-Russell Sketchbook. Courtesy of: Plains Ledger Art Digital Publishing Project (PILA).


The beauty of Indian Ledger Art isn’t just about depicting Native American history in vibrant colors and powerful compositions, but how it has influenced the next generation of Native American artists.

To Dwayne Wilcox, it’s more than artwork. It connects him to his Native American culture and reaffirms his purpose in the community. Wearing black pants, a striped dress shirt that hangs loose on his frame, and his signature pork pie hat, Wilcox stands in front of an audience speaking softly about his art and gazing earnestly at the Ledger Art drawings in his exhibit.

Dwayne Wilcox

The Lakota Ledger artist met with students and spoke in November at a public gathering hosted by the Library in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. A small collection of Wilcox’s contemporary ledger artwork was on view in an exhibition called Teíč’iȟ iŋla: Practicing Decolonial Love, curated by UC San Diego graduate students. Wilcox was joined by Ross Frank, associate professor of ethnic studies and director of the Plains Indian Ledger Art project (PILA).

Due to increased collector interest, more nineteenth-century ledger books are coming to light. However, sheets are sold individually for thousands of dollars, dispersing them on the market. In the last few years academics have been trying to reassemble book pages. Many of these fine examples of ledger art drawings are now accessible online. PILA has been working since 1995 to digitally preserve Plains Indian Ledger books under one platform to promote research and public access.

“Without trying, this digital project has brought UC San Diego about a million dollars’ worth of original, nineteenth-century Ledger Art books. We have the third largest collection of complete ledger books in the country outside of the holdings at the Smithsonian museums,” said Frank. “The Library’s Special Collections & Archives has eight complete ledger books and another one is on its way. We have a fine example of the work that was done by the 28 artists of the 72 prisoners that were held in Fort Marion in 1875 during the Red River War.”

Pictured left to right: Special Collections & Archives Director Lynda Claassen, Alison Urban, Jessica Fremlan, Melanie West, and Ethnic Studies Associate Professor Ross Frank.

PILA provides graduate students pursuing a doctorate in Ethnic Studies and other programs with hands-on training in research, digital database, and web management. In addition, the Ethnic Studies department offers courses that give undergrads and graduate students the tools to design museum exhibits that incorporate indigenous knowledge.

“It was important to me that the exhibit we created not only be a visual experience but one that prompted critical discourse and engagement among visitors. In providing a space to write or draw thoughts and responses to the exhibit we hoped that a conversation could happen on these pages,” said UC San Diego graduate student Alison Urban. “I love flipping through the book and seeing how the questions we posed through the presentation of modern and historical Ledger Art have activated students to connect with the notion of decolonial love.”

The Library’s physical collection of Ledger Art books continues to grow, albeit slowly, given their scarcity and cost. But they provide a vital teaching and research resource, and the Library will continue to work with Ross Frank and Ethnic Studies to develop and promote these unique cultural materials.

A Hub for Innovation and Learning: 3D Technologies Offered by UC San Diego Library

Higher education institutions have reached a pivotal turning point, where a confluence of innovative and ground-breaking technologies are bringing an abundance of change to the way in which we teach and learn. From cloud computing to 3D printing and augmented reality, these technologies are altering how we live and work.

For decades, a great deal of scholarly work was limited to photos and text, causing important details about objects and places to be lost and our ability to communicate complexity to be hampered. At the heart of our most recent wave of innovative technologies is a newfound ability to quickly and easily process and visualize 3D data. The means to design and build a new object, explore a place without being there, and capture and share the world around us is now highly accessible. Geisel Library’s Digital Media Lab (DML) puts these tools in the hands of students and faculty and lends expertise and context to make the learning experience simple, fun, and personally relevant. The DML offers free 3D printing, VR headset use, and expert consultation. The possibilities are endless, spanning almost every discipline.  Read more…

UC San Diego Names Erik T. Mitchell New Audrey Geisel University Librarian

Erik T. Mitchell, Ph.D. has been appointed university librarian at the University of California San Diego effective April 16, 2018. Mitchell currently serves as associate university librarian of Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services and associate chief information officer at UC Berkeley.

“Our Library is a premier resource for UC San Diego’s community of changemakers, playing a central role in the university’s mission by serving as a hub of discovery,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “Dr. Mitchell has been at the forefront of integrating new information technologies in libraries to find, use and create knowledge, so I am confident that his expertise will continue to help transform the way our academic community teaches, learns and conducts research.”

During his five years at UC Berkeley, Mitchell worked extensively with various leadership teams to advance the mission of the university, drawing on principles of service, shared values and collaboration. He advocated for and led a charge to incorporate preferred name services into the campus’ library systems, worked with vendors and systemwide colleagues to select a digital imaging platform that is ADA compliant and established processes to ensure that all new programs and services include diversity, equity and inclusion considerations at the design and decision-making stages. He also co-led the creation of programs for research data management, the expansion of targeted and mass digitization programs and comprehensive computing services for students. Additionally, he was integral to cross-institutional and nationally shared print initiatives and has served as co-principal investigator on funded research and development activities.  Read more…

Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: A Book Talk with Journalist John Pomfret

Get Ready for a Seuss-tacular Celebration in Honor of Beloved Author’s Birthday

Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, the popular children’s author-illustrator of The Cat in the Hat, which diversified mainstream children’s literature, turns 114 on Friday, March 2, 2018.

Party plans are underway at the University of California San Diego campus to celebrate the ingenious and creative spirit of Dr. Seuss during a noontime birthday bash that will include a two-story inflatable cake with candles, a giant, inflatable Cat in the Hat wearing a red and white striped hat, birthday cake, and Seussian musical entertainment by the Teeny Tiny Pit Orchestra.

Coinciding with national Read Across America Day, Dr. Seuss fans near and far are invited to join the fun being held in front of Geisel Library, the university’s flagship building named in honor of Theodor and Audrey Geisel in 1995. UC San Diego’s Interim Audrey Geisel University Librarian Tammy Nickelson Dearie will be on hand to greet party-goers and serve cupcakes to the first 2,000 attendees.

“Few readers who have grown up in the last sixty years can imagine their childhood without the wonderfully whimsical images and rhymes of Dr. Seuss. The illustrations in the more than 60 books he wrote are timeless and draw both children and adults alike,” said Dearie. “We’re honored to host a cherished campus tradition that began in the early 90’s when the UC San Diego Library received its first gift from Audrey Geisel.”  Read more…

16th Annual Paper Theatre Festival: It’s the Smallest Show on Earth!

This Scale Model Educational Toy is Being Rediscovered and Celebrated at the UC San Diego Library

Festival Dates:
Saturday, February 10 • Noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday, February 11 • Noon to 5 p.m.
(impromptu performances throughout the day both Saturday and Sunday)

Monday, February 12 • 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
(special premiere performance from alumna Lily Huang at noon)
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

This three-day exhibit in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library features replicas of Victorian Era paper theatres as well as modern versions of the toy. Live performances are featured throughout each day.

In the Victorian Era, theatrical playhouses printed fine souvenir posters showing architectural elements of their theatre. Aspects of set design were shown on the posters along with representations of actual actors of the company (shown in costume from a specific production). Condensed scripts were included in these poster kits and paper doll players were soon seen in lively productions on a table top at home, with many aspects of theatre arts being introduced to producers and performers of all ages.

From these posters, families and hobbyists would cut out the proscenium, the curtain, etc., to create a scale model of that specific theatre. These paper theatre hobbyists ended up learning much about scenic design, lighting effects, sound effects, music, acting, directing, blocking—all through this paper theatre toy. Theatre-goers often bought these paper theatre posters as souvenirs promoting an actual production they saw. Those living far from the theatre district ordered paper theatres from a catalog and had them delivered to their small town as an educational toy for the household. A lot of cutting and pasting was involved but hours of educational fun and artistic exploration would follow. The many two-dimensional layers of a paper theatre add up to something with surprising depth and charm.

Exhibit and accompanying live events of this Paper Theatre Festival are free and open to the public. For more information Contact Scott Paulson via email at or by phone at (858) 822-5758.

For information about accessible parking on campus, click here.

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