Rising from the Rubble: Creating POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

Catch the Buzz! Bee Exhibit Opens at UC San Diego Library

The UC San Diego Library is currently showcasing a bee exhibit in the Biomedical Library breezeway—just in time for spring!

The exhibit takes a closer look at the intricate world of these ecologically important insects through a plethora of information about the history of California bees. Part of the exhibit includes an interactive display of bee photographs taken under the microscope. In addition, the exhibit features a few selections from the rare collection of books documenting the history of beekeeping from Joe Bray who works as a cataloger for the Library’s Special Collections & Archives. Bray’s father studied beekeeping at UC Davis in the 1930’s and was a beekeeper in San Diego for many years.

But the highlight of the exhibit is a collection of bee specimens from San Diego’s coast, desert, and mountain areas collected by James Hung over a three-year period. Hung donated some of the specimens he amassed to the Library in 2014 while pursuing his Ph.D. at UC San Diego.

Since donating his collection to the Library, Hung and his colleagues have updated the San Diego County bee inventory to 700 species including about 70 taxonomically challenging ones, making San Diego a truly biodiversity hotspot for bees. The exhibit will be on display through the month of April.

For more information about the exhibit, please contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758.

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

2018 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 • 3:00 – 5:00 pm
Geisel Library, Classroom 2

This year, the UC San Diego Library is participating in the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon! Join us on Wednesday, March 14 in Geisel Library, Classroom 2 for an editing session to help improve Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism.

If you’re inexperienced – that’s ok! Tutorials will be provided for the beginner Wikipedian, along with reference materials and refreshments. There are Windows computers available in the library computer lab, but feel free to bring your laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation. For the editing-averse, we urge you to stop by to show your support. If possible, please create a Wikipedia account before the event. All are welcome!

Art+Feminism is a campaign improving coverage of cis and transgender women, feminism and the arts on Wikipedia. From coffee shops and community centers to the largest museums and universities in the world, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself and do-it-with-others campaign teaching people of all gender identities and expressions to edit Wikipedia. Less than 10% of editors on Wikipedia are women. Wikipedia is the largest and most popular general reference work on the internet with more than 40 million articles in more than 250 different languages. The fact is when we don’t tell our stories or participate in the ways our history is preserved, it gets erased. Gaps in the coverage of knowledge about women, gender, feminism, and the arts on one of the most visited websites in the world is a big problem and we need your help to fix it.

For more information about the event, contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

Voluminous Art: Treasures from San Diego’s University Libraries

Voluminous Art: Treasures from San Diego’s University Libraries
Saturday, March 10 – Monday, September 3, 2018
Mingei International Museum

This spring, Mingei International Museum will shine a spotlight on the special collections from the libraries of UC San Diego, San Diego State University and University of San Diego.

Voluminous Art celebrates the art of the book by showcasing approximately 25 volumes from each library collection, a sampling that will hint at centuries-old practices of book design, typography, binding and printing.

The oldest work on view will be a manuscript volume on the art and science of spelling from the 1200s. Many of the books will have been printed during the first 50 years after Gutenberg’s breakthrough with movable type, including the Nuremberg Chronicle. There will also be a portfolio of colored pictures hand drawn by a Kiowa Indian named Koba while he was imprisoned at a military facility in St. Augustine, Florida in 1876.

To honor his San Diego legacy, the Mingei will include a Dr. Seuss book with an original drawing by Theodore Geisel. Finally, there will be multiple examples of so-called artists’ books – contemporary creations,usually in very small, one-off editions of eccentric art works.

Special Collections & Archives’ Ledger Art Books Serve as Hands-On Learning Tool for Graduate Students


“Driving the Horses” plate from the Koba-Russell Sketchbook. Courtesy of: Plains Ledger Art Digital Publishing Project (PILA).


The beauty of Indian Ledger Art isn’t just about depicting Native American history in vibrant colors and powerful compositions, but how it has influenced the next generation of Native American artists.

To Dwayne Wilcox, it’s more than artwork. It connects him to his Native American culture and reaffirms his purpose in the community. Wearing black pants, a striped dress shirt that hangs loose on his frame, and his signature pork pie hat, Wilcox stands in front of an audience speaking softly about his art and gazing earnestly at the Ledger Art drawings in his exhibit.

Dwayne Wilcox

The Lakota Ledger artist met with students and spoke in November at a public gathering hosted by the Library in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. A small collection of Wilcox’s contemporary ledger artwork was on view in an exhibition called Teíč’iȟ iŋla: Practicing Decolonial Love, curated by UC San Diego graduate students. Wilcox was joined by Ross Frank, associate professor of ethnic studies and director of the Plains Indian Ledger Art project (PILA).

Due to increased collector interest, more nineteenth-century ledger books are coming to light. However, sheets are sold individually for thousands of dollars, dispersing them on the market. In the last few years academics have been trying to reassemble book pages. Many of these fine examples of ledger art drawings are now accessible online. PILA has been working since 1995 to digitally preserve Plains Indian Ledger books under one platform to promote research and public access.

“Without trying, this digital project has brought UC San Diego about a million dollars’ worth of original, nineteenth-century Ledger Art books. We have the third largest collection of complete ledger books in the country outside of the holdings at the Smithsonian museums,” said Frank. “The Library’s Special Collections & Archives has eight complete ledger books and another one is on its way. We have a fine example of the work that was done by the 28 artists of the 72 prisoners that were held in Fort Marion in 1875 during the Red River War.”

Pictured left to right: Special Collections & Archives Director Lynda Claassen, Alison Urban, Jessica Fremlan, Melanie West, and Ethnic Studies Associate Professor Ross Frank.

PILA provides graduate students pursuing a doctorate in Ethnic Studies and other programs with hands-on training in research, digital database, and web management. In addition, the Ethnic Studies department offers courses that give undergrads and graduate students the tools to design museum exhibits that incorporate indigenous knowledge.

“It was important to me that the exhibit we created not only be a visual experience but one that prompted critical discourse and engagement among visitors. In providing a space to write or draw thoughts and responses to the exhibit we hoped that a conversation could happen on these pages,” said UC San Diego graduate student Alison Urban. “I love flipping through the book and seeing how the questions we posed through the presentation of modern and historical Ledger Art have activated students to connect with the notion of decolonial love.”

The Library’s physical collection of Ledger Art books continues to grow, albeit slowly, given their scarcity and cost. But they provide a vital teaching and research resource, and the Library will continue to work with Ross Frank and Ethnic Studies to develop and promote these unique cultural materials.

Q&A: UC San Diego Library Supporter Mary Ann Beyster Reflects on Father’s Legacy

From left to right: Mary Ann, Betty, and Jim Beyster celebrated the opening of the Beyster Papers during a reception on April 21, 2017.

The Beyster name is intertwined with the history of San Diego’s entrepreneurial and technology community. The late Dr. J. Robert “Bob” Beyster built Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) from a small scientific consulting firm in the 1960s to a multibillion-dollar defense contractor powerhouse. He was known for his visionary business practices and sophisticated ability to bring out the best in his employees. SAIC grew to become one of the largest employee-owned companies in the nation.

In 2015, the Beyster family donated Bob’s Papers including business records, stock plans, and records of government-funded research to the Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Dr. Beyster’s legacy is now carried on by his daughter Mary Ann through the work she’s doing with entrepreneurship, innovation, and employee ownership in the education system. Of the Library’s valued supporters, few have a background quite as diverse as Mary Ann’s. Not only is she an enthusiastic community leader with 30 years of experience in manufacturing, technical management consulting, and small business innovation, but she’s also a passionate documentary director and producer.

Library staff asked Mary Ann a few questions to learn more about her late father’s legacy and her involvement with the UC San Diego campus.  Read more…

A Hub for Innovation and Learning: 3D Technologies Offered by UC San Diego Library

Higher education institutions have reached a pivotal turning point, where a confluence of innovative and ground-breaking technologies are bringing an abundance of change to the way in which we teach and learn. From cloud computing to 3D printing and augmented reality, these technologies are altering how we live and work.

For decades, a great deal of scholarly work was limited to photos and text, causing important details about objects and places to be lost and our ability to communicate complexity to be hampered. At the heart of our most recent wave of innovative technologies is a newfound ability to quickly and easily process and visualize 3D data. The means to design and build a new object, explore a place without being there, and capture and share the world around us is now highly accessible. Geisel Library’s Digital Media Lab (DML) puts these tools in the hands of students and faculty and lends expertise and context to make the learning experience simple, fun, and personally relevant. The DML offers free 3D printing, VR headset use, and expert consultation. The possibilities are endless, spanning almost every discipline.  Read more…

UC San Diego Names Erik T. Mitchell New Audrey Geisel University Librarian

Erik T. Mitchell, Ph.D. has been appointed university librarian at the University of California San Diego effective April 16, 2018. Mitchell currently serves as associate university librarian of Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services and associate chief information officer at UC Berkeley.

“Our Library is a premier resource for UC San Diego’s community of changemakers, playing a central role in the university’s mission by serving as a hub of discovery,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “Dr. Mitchell has been at the forefront of integrating new information technologies in libraries to find, use and create knowledge, so I am confident that his expertise will continue to help transform the way our academic community teaches, learns and conducts research.”

During his five years at UC Berkeley, Mitchell worked extensively with various leadership teams to advance the mission of the university, drawing on principles of service, shared values and collaboration. He advocated for and led a charge to incorporate preferred name services into the campus’ library systems, worked with vendors and systemwide colleagues to select a digital imaging platform that is ADA compliant and established processes to ensure that all new programs and services include diversity, equity and inclusion considerations at the design and decision-making stages. He also co-led the creation of programs for research data management, the expansion of targeted and mass digitization programs and comprehensive computing services for students. Additionally, he was integral to cross-institutional and nationally shared print initiatives and has served as co-principal investigator on funded research and development activities.  Read more…

East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: A Book Talk with Journalist John Pomfret

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