Psychiatrist Joel Dimsdale Deciphers Psyche of Nazi Leaders in New Book

AnatomyofMaliceCoverAfter World War II came to an end in 1945, the mass killing and sheer devastation wrought by the Nazis off the battlefield began to emerge in shocking detail. Some 11 million civilians—both Jews and non-Jews, including about 1.5 million children—were killed during the Holocaust. When the Allies convened the international war crimes trial in Nuremberg, American psychiatrist Douglas Kelley and psychologist Gustave Gilbert conducted extensive psychiatric interviews, IQ tests, and Rorschach inkblot tests, in an attempt to grasp and shed light on the psychological profiles of the Third Reich leadership.

University of California San Diego Psychiatrist Joel Dimsdale, equipped with the tools of modern psychiatry, psychology, and neuroscience, takes a fresh look at the unsettling findings in his new book, Anatomy of Malice: The Enigma of the Nazi War Criminals (Yale University Press, May 2016). Dimsdale, a distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry will discuss and sign copies of his book on Thursday, May 12, 2016, at a talk sponsored by the UC San Diego Library. The event is open to the public and will be held at 4:30 p.m. in Geisel Library in the Seuss Room on the UC San Diego campus. The UC San Diego Bookstore will provide copies of the book for purchase. The event is free of charge but reservations are suggested and can be made at: AnatomyOfMaliceDimsdale.eventbrite.comRead more…

Climate Change at the Crossroads Series Honors Scripps Science

63_ClimateChangeSeriesThe Library will hold a series of events this April in recognition of Earth Month 2016. The Climate Change at the Crossroads series salutes renowned climate scientists at the university’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography with three events that will shed light on different facets of climate change, including the need for a unified disciplinary approach, the impact of deceptive campaigns to confuse the public, and the importance of clear and accurate scientific communications. All events are free and open to the public, and will be held from 5:30 – 7:30 pm in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library.  Reservations are recommended, see links below.

The Climate Change at the Crossroads series will kick off on Wednesday, April 6, with a talk by  Veerabhadran Ramanathan, a distinguished professor of atmospheric and climate sciences at Scripps on Bending the Curve of Climate Change: Why Do We Need an Alliance Between Science, Religion & Policy? Read more…

March 29 Event to Showcase “Kitchenistas of National City”

Screen Shot 2015-06-08 at 1.18.22 PMThe UC San Diego Library will hold a screening and reception for The Kitchenistas of National City, an award-winning documentary produced by Mary Ann Beyster, featuring the “Kitchenistas,”  who are creating new eating habits and traditions in a community whose rates of obesity and diabetes are among the highest.

The screening and reception will take place on Tuesday, March 29, at the UC San Diego Faculty Club from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are requested. The film screening will be followed by a discussion with Mary Ann Beyster, Healy Vigderson with Olivewood Gardens, and Kitchenista Patricia Corona, and UC San Diego Community Health representatives. After a post-discussion Q&A, a variety of healthy Latin-inspired dishes will be served, including items prepared by the Kitchenistas.

The film, which chronicles the struggles and triumphs of National City families who lack a community grocery store yet are plagued with fast food options on every corner, was screened at the I Imagine Film Festival in New York City, the Global Health Film Festival in London, and the Pasadena Film Festival earlier this month. The film was also screened recently at the Latino Film Festival in San Diego.

Olivewood Gardens and Learning Center, part of the International Community Foundation, created the Cooking for Salud! program in 2012 with the goal of empowering local families to take control of their health through the foods they eat and prepare at home.  Graduates of the program are called Kitchenistas and have proven themselves to be passionate about the changes they are making at home, for their families, and for their community.

To make reservations and get more information about the event, please visit: kitchenistasfilm.eventbrite.com.

Book publishing that’s Open Access and high quality? Consider Luminos from UC Press.

luminos

UC San Diego authors in the market for a publisher should consider Luminos, the Open Access (OA) publishing program for scholarly monographs from UC Press. Luminos titles go through the same rigorous selection and peer review processes as all other UC press books and are published in both digital and traditional formats. The digital editions of all Luminos-published titles are available free of charge to anyone in the world, which makes them widely accessible to readers regardless of their home institution’s library budget and ideal for assigned course readings in the age of prohibitively high textbook prices. The traditional print copies are available for purchase, review copies, and other publicity such as conference booths.  Both versions will be identical in content and layout, but digital editions can also include live links and interactive multimedia such as audio, video, or maps.

In the OA model, publishing costs are shifted from the final product’s readers to the content creators, in this case: the author and UC Press. Authors are not paid royalties, as any revenue from print sales helps offset the costs of the OA digital editions. UC Press calculates the cost of OA monograph publishing at approximately $15,000; the author’s contribution for University of California faculty, books based on UC dissertations, and books in series where the editor is UC faculty is $5,000.

To support this venture, UC San Diego Library will cover the (full) author fee of $5000 for UC San Diego authors’ accepted books. For more information, contact Annelise Sklar (asklar@ucsd.edu), the Social Sciences Collection Coordinator.

“Happy Birthday To You” Dr. Seuss’ 112th Birthday Celebration March 2nd

DrSeuss16DSC_9660_UCSanDiegoPublication_ErikJepsenThe University of California, San Diego campus is making preparations for its annual birthday party to celebrate one of the campus’s most beloved luminaries, Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. The fantastically creative children’s book author’s 112th birthday celebration coincides with national Read Across America Day and comes on the heels of the UC San Diego Library’s recent announcement to name its new café in honor of the author’s wife, Audrey Geisel.

The party, which is open to Dr. Seuss fans both on and off campus, will be held at noon on Wednesday, March 2, in front of Geisel Library, the campus’s flagship building named in 1995 for Theodor and Audrey Geisel. The event will be hosted by University Librarian Brian E. C. Schottlaender. Birthday festivities include a giant inflatable Cat in the Hat as well as free cake and Seussian musical entertainment by The Teeny Tiny Pit Orchestra, directed by the Library’s Scott Paulson.

FullSizeRender (3)In addition to the birthday party, a modest exhibit of materials from the Dr. Seuss Collection will be on view from February 23 through March 7, 2016 in Geisel Library.

The UC San Diego Library received Theodor Seuss Geisel’s collection of drawings, manuscripts, notebooks, and other memorabilia after his death in 1991. In 1995, Audrey Geisel made a substantial donation to support the university’s Library, which was subsequently named Geisel Library. Last year, Audrey Geisel made a $3 million donation to the Library to refurbish the building’s main public spaces. The Library’s Special Collections & Archives is the world’s main repository for the original works of Dr. Seuss. The Dr. Seuss Collection holds more than 15,000 items, including original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs and memorabilia, documenting the full range of Geisel’s creative achievements, from his high school activities in 1919 through his death in 1991.

For more information about the Dr. Seuss Collection at the UC San Diego Library, visit http://lib.ucsd.edu/dr-seuss-collection.

“A” is for Audrey at Geisel Library Café, Slated to Open in Spring 2016

The long-awaited Geisel Library café won’t open its doors until spring 2016, but, already, it’s  earned an “A.” But, this A is not the coveted grade, it’s for Audrey, specifically Audrey Geisel, the generous benefactor of the University of California, San Diego Library for whom the new café will be named.

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A working draft of what the café space will look like as of February 2016.

Audrey’s is expected to be completed in mid to late spring, with a grand opening planned for the campus and community supporters in May 2016. The café, which has been under construction since last December, is located on the 2nd (main) floor in the East Wing of Geisel Library, conveniently situated on the north end of the building’s most heavily used study area, which also houses the overnight study commons.

“I’m truly touched that so many of my friends at the UC San Diego Library have decided to name this new café after me,” said Audrey Geisel. “Even before we established the Dr. Seuss Collection here at the Library many years ago, I felt that this was a very special place, and certainly worthy of my continuing support. I know that Ted (Dr. Seuss) felt the same way, so I’m very pleased to know that our support will help to provide the resources and the services—not to mention caffeine— that today’s library patrons need to stay on the cutting edge.”

The café is one of the many enhancements planned for the university’s flagship building over the next several years, thanks to a $3 million gift made by Audrey Geisel in July 2015, which is the lead gift in the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative, a major endeavor aimed at transforming and rejuvenating the interior public spaces of the Library to meet the evolving needs of students, faculty, and other Library users in an increasingly digital environment. Read more…

Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: Paris COP21

faculty_victorOn February 24, the University of California, San Diego Library will sponsor Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21, featuring climate change policy expert David Victor and students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who attended COP21, and will provide their insights on the process and the outcome. The event is free and open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library.

David Victor, a professor of international relations at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy & Strategy, has been a participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) proceedings since the IPCC’s inception, and was a party to the negotiations in Paris. School of Global Policy and Strategy students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who accompanied Victor at the Paris talks, were part of the large UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography delegation, and helped to advocate for an increased recognition of the role of oceans in the new climate. Victor, who has been an astute observer of and an active contributor to climate change negotiations since the late 1980s, believes there are very specific reasons why COP21, while not without its flaws, was more productive than any climate negotiations in the last 20 years.

Victor, co-director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, is the author of Global Warming Gridlock, his 2011 book which argued that a “radical rethinking” of global warming policy was needed in order to make international law more effective in bringing about international compacts to reduce global emissions. The Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21), held in December 2015, employed the “bottom-up approach” Victor advocated in his book, producing an international agreement that sets both short and long term targets for reducing emissions worldwide. Last year, Victor also wrote a paper for the journal, Nature, which pushed for a more streamlined and less constricted focus that would better integrate the social sciences in the climate change policy process, to more effectively address related social, political, and psychological issues. Read more…

What’s Climate Change To You?

What's Climate Changepic

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Events Room, Biomedical Library Building

Light refreshments will be served.

Join us as Dr. Bruce Bekkar, a UC San Diego alumnus and a member of Doctors for Climate Health with the American Lung Association, discusses how climate change is affecting human health, and what we can do to prevent a climate crisis.

Dr. Bekkar just recently left his San Diego medical practice to devote his time to local and global environmental issues. Last spring, he completed Climate Reality Leadership Training, which included instruction from Vice President Al Gore and some of the nation’s leading climate scientists.

“Having been a physician for nearly 30 years not only helps me to understand the risks that a destabilized climate poses to life on earth, but it also gives me the authority and access to the audiences that  need to hear this message,” said Bekkar. “Put another way, as an obstetrician, I worked to preserve human life and helped new ones get started. As a climate activist, I’m working to preserve human health and to preserve nature, which is necessary for our survival as well as our happiness.”  Read more…

Exhibit Sheds Light on Chinese Transcontinental Railway Workers

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Chinese work group for the Great Northern Railway, c. 1909. (Photo courtesy of Royal British Columbia Museum)

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental, produced by the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford University, is on display through February 29, 2016 in Geisel Library on the University of California, San Diego campus. The exhibit tells the undocumented story of thousands of Chinese migrants, who played an instrumental role in the construction of the nation’s first transcontinental railway in the 1860s.

In addition to the partnership with the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford, the Chinese American Library Association’s Task Force on Chinese Railroad Workers, which seeks to increase awareness and appreciation for the contributions of Chinese Americans, helped to bring the exhibit to the campus.

A reception will be held on Friday, January 22, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library, to celebrate the opening of the exhibit at the UC San Diego Library, the first institution to host the exhibit after its debut last summer at Stanford University and the Chinese Historical Society of America. The reception will include remarks from: Hilton Obenzinger, associate director of the Chinese Railroad Workers Project and a Lecturer in American Studies & English at Stanford University; Simeon Man, a scholar of Asian American Studies and an assistant professor in UC San Diego’s Department of History; and Murray Lee, Curator of Chinese American History for the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum. The event is free and open to the public. To make a reservation, please visit: http://lib.ucsd.edu/ironroadRead more…

Holocaust Living History Workshop Winter 2016: “Holocaust Journeys”

Charlotte_Salomon

Work by German-Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon who died at Auschwitz in 1943.

The 2015-16 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) series continues this January with six compelling authors, films, and other events highlighting the diverse “Holocaust Journeys” of survivors and others recounting their personal stories. Co-sponsored by the University of California, San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program, the HLHW lecture series invites local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars to share their personal stories and memories with students and interested members of the public. The goal of the program is to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

All events are free and open to the public, and are held on Wednesdays on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5 to 7 p.m., with some exceptions (as noted below).

January 13Think Only of Today: A Documentary Film about the Life of Holocaust Survivor, Max Garcia (With Alberto Lau and Robert Schneider)

Think Only of Today traces the life of Max Garcia from his childhood in Amsterdam, through the Holocaust, and finally to his immigration and life in the United States. Born in 1924, Max was interned in Westerbork before being deported to Auschwitz and later Mauthausen. The documentary, which follows Max’s ordeal through war and incarceration, also explores the effect of the Holocaust on succeeding generations. Interviews with Max’s children and grandchildren reveal the different ways individuals from each generation have grappled with the burden of such a searing experience.

February 10Exile in Ecuador (With Moselio Schaechter)

Moselio Schaechter spent his childhood in Mussolini’s Italy. Thanks to a transit visa for Portugal and the United States, the Schaechters made it to Quito, Ecuador in January 1941. Over the next nine years, Moselio struggled to accommodate his Jewish identity with a nascent South American self. In this talk he shares memories of his youth, his experience in the Ecuadorian Jewish refugee community, his life in the U.S., and his subsequent visit to his old “home.” Schaechter is a distinguished professor emeritus at Tufts University and an adjunct professor in microbiology at SDSU and UC San Diego. Read more…

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