Attorney Who Recovered Klimt’s Famous “Golden Lady” Painting to Speak May 6

MARIA&R2 Attorney E. Randol Schoenberg was able to accomplish what few thought was possible—He recovered Gustav Klimt’s famous “Golden Lady” painting, which was stolen by the Nazis in 1938. Schoenberg’s experiences are the subject of a newly released movie, Woman in Gold, which he will discuss at the May 6 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) event. His talk, “Whatever Happened to Klimt’s Golden Lady,” is sponsored by Phyllis and Daniel Epstein. HLWH is a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the Jewish Studies program.

Schoenberg, a top litigator and the grandson of composer Arnold Schoenberg, succeeded in getting back the “Golden Lady” painting and other works of art after a seven-year struggle against the Austrian government. Woman in Gold—starring Helen Mirren, Ryan Reynolds, and Katie Holmes— is the true story of Schoenberg’s decision to take on a seemingly hopeless case for a close family friend, Maria Altmann, who was trying to recover six Klimt paintings stolen from her family home in Austria in 1938. The famous painting, officially called “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I,” depicts Altmann’s aunt, swathed in a glittering mosaic of gold.

Mariapainting

Woman in Gold is based on Schoenberg and Altmann’s experiences, which are also the subject of the Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt’s Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Blauer, the 2012 book by Anne-Marie O’Connor.

The May 6 talk will take place at 5 p.m. at the Copley International Conference Center on the UC San Diego campus. The event will begin at 4:30 p.m., with light refreshments. The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are recommended. To reserve seats, and for more information: https://hlhw-klimt.eventbrite.com. For more information about the Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661 or visit: http://library.ucsd.edu/hlhw.

 

Behind-the-Scenes Tour of Inland Empire Libraries on April 24

Smiley

A.K. Smiley Library Public Library

If you like books, libraries, architecture, and science fiction, you might want to sign up for an all-day tour Friday, April 24, with UC San Diego’s University Librarian, Brian Schottlaender, to visit some of the Inland Empire’s most spectacular libraries.

The tour will start at the A.K. Smiley Public Library in Redlands, an architectural gem and a designated historic landmark which opened in 1898. Participants will get a custom tour by Library director Don McCue and will learn about the Smiley’s rare and valuable materials from Special Collections director, Nathan Gonzales. This stop will include a visit to the Lincoln Memorial Shrine just next door.

Rivera

Rivera Library UC Riverside

From Redlands, the group will head to Riverside for an informal lunch at the amazing Mission Inn with Steve Mandeville-Gamble, UC Riverside’s university librarian. After lunch, participants will have time to explore the stunning and unusual Mission Inn before departing for the UC Riverside campus, and a tour of UC Riverside’s Special Collections & Archives. At UCR, library staff will share highlights of the collection, including the Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy, the largest publicly-accessible collection of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and utopian literature in the world.
The all-day excursion will begin with an 8:30 a.m. departure by coach from the Supercomputer Center on the UC San Diego campus, and will return at approximately 6 p.m. The fee to attend is $80 per person, which includes transportation, lunch, snacks, and gratuity. Seating is limited to 25 people!

To register, please contact Christina Continelli no later than Friday, April 17, 2015
at 858-534-1183, or ccontinelli@ucsd.edu.

 

New Collection Endowments Provide Vital Support for the Library

Collection endowments have been critical in supporting and growing the Library’s collections, ensuring that the Library’s information resources will be maintained and enhanced in perpetuity. Over the years, supporters of the UC San Diego Library have established more than 50 collection endowments that support academic disciplines and intellectual interests. Recently, several collection endowments have been enhanced or newly established—including one from a long established San Diego family, as well as endowments from a UC San Diego faculty member and an alumna.

Robert and Fredricka Driver

Robert and Fredricka Driver

In December 2014, a significant gift was made by the children of Robert and Fredricka Driver to strengthen the Fredricka Driver Endowment Library Fund. This endowment was established in 1986, in conjunction with an NEH matching grant by long-time San Diegan and civic leader, Robert “Bob” Driver, in honor of his wife, Fredricka, best known as Freddie.

“My parents had a deep love of learning and were thrilled when UC San Diego was established in 1960, in a location so close to their Del Mar home,” said Sandy Driver-Gordon. “My mother especially appreciated what an education could bring, as she attended Pomona College at a time when women generally did not pursue higher education.”

The Driver family also demonstrated their generosity to the San Diego community in numerous ways. Bob—founder of one of San Diego’s most prominent independent insurance brokerage firms—was a major supporter of Project Concern (now Project Concern International), a humanitarian, San Diego-based non-profit, and also ran for a number of political offices. Freddie’s many charitable activities included volunteering as head of the San Diego Girl Scouts and Door of Hope, a home for unwed mothers.

“With this recent gift, the Driver endowment is now one of the Library’s largest collection endowments and provides significant support for the humanities materials. We thank the Driver family for their continued commitment to the Library and the University,” said University Librarian Brian Schottlaender. “We are also very grateful to Pamela Newcomb and Clare and Paul Friedman for their support.”

In addition to the Driver family, a new endowment—the Pamela Newcomb Library Collection Endowment—has been established by UC San Diego alumna Pamela Newcomb, in support of humanities collections. Pamela graduated in 1981,

Pamela Newcomb

Pamela Newcomb

with a degree in history and classical studies and felt that the Library supported her studies in a very meaningful way.  “I am enthusiastic to be able to create this endowment in support of the humanities collections,” said Pamela. “The Library was so important to my educational experience at UC San Diego and I feel fortunate that I can now support the excellence of the information resources available to future generations of students, faculty, and the general public.” Pamela’s gift will help nurture a new generation of humanities scholars who can take advantage of cutting-edge research materials in classical studies, history, art, philosophy, literature, music, and other topics that form many cultural heritages.

A second collection endowment was established by long-time Library supporters, Paul and Clare Friedman, whose endowment provides unrestricted support for the Library’s general research collections. Paul Friedman is a professor emeritus at UC San Diego; Clare Friedman is a retired faculty member at USD.

Paul and Clare Friedman

Paul and Clare Friedman

“We are delighted to establish the Paul and Clare Friedman Library Collection Endowment at the UC San Diego Library,” said the Friedmans.  “As emeriti faculty and lifelong readers, it means a great deal to us to support the Library’s collections and their vital role in fueling discovery and learning at UC San Diego and beyond.  We have supported the Library for many years and felt it was the right time to create an endowed fund that will impact the resources available to students and faculty for generations to come.  We encourage others to do the same!”

If you are interested in providing collection endowment support to the UC San Diego Library, please contact Julie Sully, Director of Development, at 858-822-4554 or jsully@ucsd.edu.

The Holocaust Living History Workshop presents: “Archival Footprints, in Search of the Grishavers”

Originally from Belgium, Herman Grishaver survived the war thanks to his family’s escape to the United States. Since retiring from his neurology practice, he has researched the fates of numerous family members during and after the Holocaust. His journey through archives on several continents has yielded surprising insights that take the audience from Antwerp to Linz and from Perpignan to Jerusalem. The result is a tapestry of stories woven from memories, images, and scraps of paper. Robert Nichols, a child refugee from Nazi Germany, will introduce Hermann Grishaver.

This event will take place Wednesday, March 11, 2015 in the Seuss Room of the Geisel Library from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

 

HLHW march 2015

Wild and Wacky Dr. Seuss Hats on View thru March 22

Seuss.viking.hat

The exhibit features a selection of 26 unique and historic hats from Theodor Seuss Geisel’s personal collection of wild and wacky headgear. The hats, displayed within a turn-of-the-century steamer trunk referred to as the “Hat Closet,” will be on display in the Library’s Special Collections & Archives’ public space, and will be accompanied by panels and exhibited material on the wall and in the cases adjacent to the SC&A entrance.

Hat’s Off to Dr. Seuss! will be on view during the week, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., beginning Tuesday, February 24. On Monday, March 2, the day of the University’s Dr. Seuss Birthday celebration, which takes place at noon in front of Geisel Library, the exhibit can be viewed from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The party, hosted by Chancellor Pradeep Khosla and University Librarian Brian E. C. Schottlaender, will include cake and musical entertainment by The Teeny Tiny Pit Orchestra.

Seuss.military.hat

“We are thrilled that some of Ted Geisel’s amazing hats will be here for members of the campus and local communities to see, especially during the campus’ annual Dr. Seuss birthday celebration on March 2,” said Lynda Claassen, director of UC San Diego Library’s Special Collections & Archives. “It is only fitting to have the Hats Off to Dr. Seuss exhibit here, in the Library that was named for Ted Geisel and houses his personal papers, original art, photographs, and other materials.”

Ted Geisel’s fascination with hats dates back to his childhood. As a writer and artist, he viewed his hats as “transformational,” and was known to pull one out of his vast “hat closet” to stimulate his creativity or assist him in solving a problem. While some of the hats in the exhibit are distinctly Seussian, others—such as a plastic toy Viking helmet—reflect Geisel’s sense of humor or sensibility, not necessarily a character from his books. Geisel collected hats over a 60-year period—beginning in the 1930s— and his legendary “hat closet” contained in excess of 200 hats.

Seuss.Straw.Curls.hat.jpeg

Hats Off to Dr. Seuss!, an exhibit of original hats from Theodor Seuss Geisel’s personal collection, will be on display in Geisel Library on from Feb. 23 through March 22, just in time for the University’s annual Dr. Seuss Birthday Party on March 2.

The UC San Diego Library received Geisel’s collection of drawings, notebooks, and other memorabilia after his death in 1991, and four years later Audrey Geisel made a substantial donation to support the university’s Library, which was subsequently named Geisel Library. The Library’s Special Collections & Archives houses more than 12,000 items in its Dr. Seuss Collection, which includes original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs and memorabilia, documenting the full range of Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative achievements, from his high school activities in 1919 through his death in 1991.

Categories: Library News

Your input = $20 gift card

 

DUS-Webpage-Banner_2

UC San Diego faculty and students – do you use the library’s website?

We want to know how it works for you!

We are looking for volunteers to have a short interview with a UC San Diego librarian and tell us how you use the library’s website – 1 hour of your time. The interviews will run from Feb. 16 to March 6 . As a thank-you for your participation, you will receive a $20 Triton gift card. First come, first served!

Tell us your status/year in school and we will get in touch!

Categories: Library News

Holocaust Living History Workshop Events/Winter 2015

All Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) Events will be held in the UC San Diego Library’s Seuss Room from 5:30 to 7 p.m., and are free and open to the public. For more information about the HLHW, which is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the Judaic Studies Program, please contact Susanne Hillman, Program Coordinator, at HLHW@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Jan. 21: After Auschwitz: Choosing Life – with Edith Eger

Most accounts of the Holocaust end with liberation and neglect the survivors’ postwar experience. How does one deal with the wreckage of one’s life in the aftermath of catastrophe? As a young girl Edith Eger of Kosice, Hungary, was deported to Auschwitz where both of her parents were murdered. At war’s end, she moved to the United States and became a clinical psychologist with her own practice in La Jolla. While she could have chosen to remain a permanent victim, she realized early on that true freedom can only be found by forgiving, letting go, and moving on. A prolific motivational speaker, Dr. Eger has appeared on Oprah and on Dutch national television.

Feb. 25: Judith Hughes, and the title is: Bearing Witness: The Diaries of Victor Klemperer

Twenty years ago the publication of the diaries of Victor Klemperer, a little known German-Jewish literary scholar who lived through the Nazi period, was an immediate literary sensation. Published in English as I will bear Witness, the diaries offer an intimate account of everyday life in a totalitarian society. They document trivial events and emotions as much as rumors and news of atrocities. Judith Hughes,  a specialist in the history of psychoanalysis, uses the diaries as a starting point to probe the difficult question of the perpetrators’ motive. Her discussion is part of a broader argument about historians’ revival of concern with actors’ meanings, intentions, and purposes.  Judith Hughes is a professor of history and an adjunct professor of psychiatry at UC San Diego. She is also on the faculty of the San Diego Psychoanalytic Institute and has a small psychoanalytic practice. She has published seven books including From Freud’s Consulting Room: The Unconscious in a Scientific Age; From Obstacle to Ally: The Evolution of Psychoanalytic Practice; Guilt and Its Vicissitudes: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Morality; and most recently, The Holocaust and the Revival of Psychological History.

March 11: Archival Footprints: In Search of the Grishavers – with Herman GrishaverHLHWAuschwitz women

Originally from Belgium, Herman Grishaver survived the war thanks to his family’s escape to the United States. Since retiring from his neurology practice, he has researched the fates of numerous family members during and after the Holocaust. His journey through archives on several continents has yielded surprising insights that take the audience from Antwerp to Linz and from Perpignan to Jerusalem. The result is a tapestry of stories woven from memories, images, and scraps of paper.

The talks are part of the HLHW’s ongoing efforts to broaden understanding of the past and to foster tolerance. At the events, attendees will have the opportunity to hear about the experiences of local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, and others, and to learn about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest database of Holocaust testimony. The UC San Diego Library is one of only three university libraries on the West Coast to have access to the USC Shoah Foundation Institute Visual History Archive, founded by film maker Steven Spielberg to document the stories of Holocaust survivors for his movie, “Schindler’s List.”

Crowd Sourced Collage

Have a cool photo you’d like to be shown in Geisel Library?  Send it to LearningSpaces@ucsd.edu by 5 pm on Monday, January 19 and we’ll consider it for a collage we’re making for a large study room.  We welcome primarily photos about the library (interior, exterior, anything), campus (places and activities), UCSD students (studying, relaxing, playing, working, and more), and La Jolla/Southern California (scenery, city-scapes, activities, and more), but might consider others as well if you have a particular favorite.

 

Submitting photos indicates your willingness for the library to post them in a public area of the library.  You may (and are encouraged to) send photos of yourself, but please do not send photos of other identifiable people without their permission.  Please send your full name and email along with the photo(s).  Submit as many as you like.  The library will select the final photos to be displayed.

 

Direct any questions to LearningSpaces@ucsd.edu.

UC Libraries Become Hub for Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) DPLA 2brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world online. An online library into the United States’ historical and cultural heritage, DPLA aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more.

The UC Libraries have recently joined the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as a Content Hub. In our role as a DPLA Content Hub, the California Digital Library will be sharing metadata records from Calisphere, a website containing approximately 250,000 digital primary source objects contributed by libraries, archives, and museums across the state of California– including unique content from across the UC Libraries. Because of the increased exposure, the UC Libraries’ digital resources will have a broader, nationwide audience that will be able to find and discover unique collections maintained across the UC Libraries.

Browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, physical location via a map, a virtual bookshelf, and faceted search. You can also save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. Never has our cultural heritage been so easy to explore!

Books and Bytes

The UC San Diego Library is on the leading edge in the digital library world.  Books Bytes alumni mag

The fall issue of Triton Magazine, features the Library in the cover story, Books & Bytes, and provides an in-depth look at the “Digital Shift” that most libraries (including ours) have been experiencing. Learn more about our activities – both bytes and books—in this recent cover story. The UC San Diego Library is a national leader in managing this evolution.

 

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