How open science helps researchers succeed

Open access, open data, open source, and other open scholarship practices are growing in popularity and necessity. However, widespread adoption of these practices has not yet been achieved. One reason is that researchers are uncertain about how sharing their work will affect their careers. We review literature demonstrating that open research is associated with increases in citations, media attention, potential collaborators, job opportunities, and funding opportunities. These findings are evidence that open research practices bring significant benefits to researchers relative to more traditional closed practices.  more

 

Published July 7, 2016
Cite as eLife 2016;10.7554/eLife.16800

eLife

Open Access Publishing Workshop (for Grads, Postdocs) – April 26

OAlogo Is Open Access Publishing right for you?
Expand the reach of your scholarly work

Workshop for Postdocs and Graduate Students
Tuesday, April 26, 2016 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Horizon Room, Career Services Center

Register at https://libraryopenaccess2016.eventbrite.com

Read more…

SCOAP3 Publishes 10,000th Open Access Article

SCOAP3 celebrates the publication of its 10,000th Open Access article. Since the start of its operation in 2014, the initiative has supported Open Access publication of High-Energy-Physics articles in 10 high-quality peer-reviewed journals. More than 18,000 scientists from over 90 countries have benefited from this initiative…

SCOAP3 – the Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics is a partnership of 3,000 libraries (including the California Digital Library), funding agencies and research centres in 44 countries, together with 3 intergovernmental organisations. Working with leading publishers, SCOAP3 has converted key journals in High-Energy Physics to Open Access at no cost for authors by redirecting funds previously used for subscriptions.

 

Social Media Data Now Available via Crimson Hexagon

Crimson Hexagon logo

Do you use social media posts as a data source? The Library is piloting (through September 30, 2017) a subscription to Crimson Hexagon, a web-based library of social media posts (updated in real-time) and social media analysis software platform. Posts can be searched using keywords and then either downloaded for off-line analysis with third party tools or analyzed using Crimson Hexagon’s data visualizations.

Data sources include:

  • Twitter: Full Twitter Firehose (all public tweets) through a direct partnership with Twitter beginning July 2010. Twitter content via the Gardenhose from July 2009.
  • Tumblr: Full Tumblr Firehose through a direct partnership with Tumblr beginning January 2015.
  • Google Plus
  • Blogs, for example blogspot.com.
  • Forums, for example reddit.com and yahoo.com.
  • Facebook
  • Instagram Hashtags
  • Reviews: Product-based reviews from consumer sites such as tripadvisor.com and amazon.com.
  • News: Fact-based articles by formal news organizations, such as CNN, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, etc.
  • Comments: Reader responses to blogs, news, and forum posts.
  • YouTube: Content from video descriptions and comments.
  • Weibo*: As of September 1, 2015, currently unavailable due to the Chinese Government has forcing SINA to suspend all data leaving China through any and all data delivery vehicles pending an official policy regarding foreign use.

For more information on using Crimson Hexagon, see our guide or contact Annelise Sklar (asklar@ucsd.edu), Social Sciences Collection Coordinator, or Tim Dennis (timdennis@ucsd.edu), Data Services & Collections Librarian.

Book publishing that’s Open Access and high quality? Consider Luminos from UC Press.

luminos

UC San Diego authors in the market for a publisher should consider Luminos, the Open Access (OA) publishing program for scholarly monographs from UC Press. Luminos titles go through the same rigorous selection and peer review processes as all other UC press books and are published in both digital and traditional formats. The digital editions of all Luminos-published titles are available free of charge to anyone in the world, which makes them widely accessible to readers regardless of their home institution’s library budget and ideal for assigned course readings in the age of prohibitively high textbook prices. The traditional print copies are available for purchase, review copies, and other publicity such as conference booths.  Both versions will be identical in content and layout, but digital editions can also include live links and interactive multimedia such as audio, video, or maps.

In the OA model, publishing costs are shifted from the final product’s readers to the content creators, in this case: the author and UC Press. Authors are not paid royalties, as any revenue from print sales helps offset the costs of the OA digital editions. UC Press calculates the cost of OA monograph publishing at approximately $15,000; the author’s contribution for University of California faculty, books based on UC dissertations, and books in series where the editor is UC faculty is $5,000.

To support this venture, UC San Diego Library will cover the (full) author fee of $5000 for UC San Diego authors’ accepted books. For more information, contact Annelise Sklar (asklar@ucsd.edu), the Social Sciences Collection Coordinator.

A social networking site is not an open access repository

“What’s the difference between ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and the institutional repository?”

“I put my papers in ResearchGate, is that enough for the open access policy?

From Katie Fortney and Justin Gonder at CDL (California Digital Library), an excellent explanation on the differences between ResearchGate, Academia.Edu, and institutional repositories like UC’s eScholarship, and why depositing your articles in the first two does not meet the definition of an open access repository or open access journal per the UC Open Access Policy.

Lingua – editors and editorial board resign

All six editors and all 31 editorial board members of Lingua, one of the top journals in linguistics, last week resigned to protest Elsevier’s policies on pricing and its refusal to convert the journal to an open-access publication that would be free online. As soon as January, when the departing editors’ noncompete contracts expire, they plan to start a new open-access journal to be called Glossa.    more

Open Access Without Tears

Is there a way to do good, respected research and still make it available to anyone in the world who wants to read it?

Actually, yes, in many cases. And it’s not necessarily that hard, though it does add extra steps and can require a bit of research up front.

Earlier this month, librarian Barbara Fister wrote a great article on ways to make your scholarship more open to researchers who don’t have the level of access that UC/UCSD affiliates have through our large number of journal licenses.

Including:

  • Tips on finding good open access journal publishers***
  • Self-archiving a copy of your article (often the final accepted manuscript) in a university’s institutional repository
    • For UCSD that would be eScholarship, and shortly we will have a mechanism in place that will make this process even easier. As your new articles are identified through searches in various databases, you’ll be prompted to “claim” them if they are indeed yours and then upload a copy or link out if the article is already open access elsewhere.
  • Potential OA options for book publishing, and even some ways to share and publicize even if the book itself isn’t OA.

*** For some publishers, article processing charge discounts–and in come cases, full waivers–are available to UCSD authors.

APS Begins Release of Public Access Papers

American Physical Society News: August 3 2015

As the clamor for open access to scientific research has intensified in recent years, a group of scientific publishers — of which APS is a member — responded in 2013 by creating the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS), which connects users with publicly accessible research on publishers’ websites. Now, APS is releasing the first wave of articles, making papers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) freely available through CHORUS effective August 1, several months ahead of the department’s official October 1 start date.  more …

Peer Review Week Sept 28 – Oct 2

“Peer review is a subject that – despite the fact that most researchers continue to trust it – divides opinion in the wider scholarly community. There is certainly much to discuss, but there is also much to celebrate!”

more in this Scholarly Kitchen blog post

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