Weeklong Summer Training Program for Scholarly Communications Starts July 30

125 participants attended the 2017 FSCI at UC San Diego

 

Do you want to be part of a growing community that aims to transform and improve the future of research communication and e-Scholarship? Then join us for the second installment of the Force11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI) from July 30 to August 3, 2018 at the MET Building on the UC San Diego campus. The program, hosted by the UC San Diego Library, provides learning opportunities for both the expert and the novice in scholarly communication.

The five-day intensive summer training institute is designed to help researchers, students, administrators, librarians, post docs and others navigate the ever-changing and increasingly complex scholarly communications landscape. FSCI will incorporate intensive coursework, seminar participation, group activities, lectures, and hands-on training taught by worldwide leading experts in various aspects of scholarly communication. Participants will attend courses on a wide range of topics including author carpentry, bad publishing, reproducible code and data, software citation, public humanities and more.  Read more…

A New Model for Open Access: Radically Accessible and Transparent

Hear about advances in peer review and options for publishing!

May 15, 2018 at 1:00 pm

Geisel Library Dunst Classroom.

peer review illustration

Image Credit: Flickr User AJC1
Creative Commons License: BY-SA

A New Model for Open Access (OA): Radically Accessible and Transparent 

What exactly does the “access” mean in OA? Some university presses have begun to publish works open access, but this often means that either the authors or their institution have to come up with large subventions to make this possible. We will discuss the benefits of OA broadly but also platinum OA in particular, which is the version that is neither market dependent nor contingent upon subventions.

Along with its benefits, OA has many challenges, one of which is a reputation problem. Presses are dealing with this is through rigorous peer review. But when we say something is peer reviewed, what exactly do we mean? Scholarly publishers of all kinds (OA and traditional, commercial and non-profit) claim that their uniqueness pivots on the process of peer review; however, when we ask individual presses what form that process takes, the answers vary. In this talk, we will discuss the work that is being sponsored by Lever and MIT on a signaling system for peer review transparency. We will also discuss the unique challenge that DH projects pose in the peer review process.

Speaker Bio:

Beth Bouloukos acquires broadly in the humanities and social sciences for the open access and digitally native Amherst College and Lever Presses. She previously acquired books in education, Latin American/Latinx studies, and gender and sexuality studies at SUNY Press for seven years. Beth received her PhD from Cornell University where she researched Latin American literature, film, and culture through a feminist lens.  She has also served as a visiting assistant professor at Fairfield University and the University at Albany, SUNY.

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility in Scholarly Communication

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility 
in Scholarly Communication
Thursday, April 19 • 2-4 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Shifting the scholarly culture toward open access, open data and open workflow is partly an incentives problem, partly an infrastructure problem, and partly a coordination problem.  The Center for Open Science (COS) is a non-profit technology and culture change organization working on all three. Central elements of COS’s strategy are to provide policy, incentive, and normative solutions that are applicable across institution, funder, publisher, and society stakeholders, and to provide efficient implementations of those solutions with open-source public goods infrastructure that is branded and operated by the communities themselves (OSF).

Brian Nosek is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, which operates the Open Science Framework. COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit, a multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition–thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one’s intentions and goals. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature’s 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information about the event, contact Serafin Raya at s1raya@ucsd.edu.

Knowledge Unlatched: UC San Diego is an Open Access Hero for 2018!

UC San Diego saw the second highest usage of any institution in North America and the seventh highest usage worldwide of scholarly content from Knowledge Unlatched.

As part of UC San Diego Library’s ongoing support for Open Access, the library pledges funds to “unlatch” books in partnership with Knowledge Unlatched. We are more than pleased to learn that our support has made some impact!

Here’s an example:

Ned Randolph, a Communication Studies PhD candidate, published “River Activism, “Levees-Only” and the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927” in Media and Communication published by Cogitatio Press. Not only does he retain copyright and licenses his work with Creative Commons license, but he has seen 240 views and 29 downloads since publishing in open access on February 9, 2018. That’s 29 downloads in three days! See the info graphic showcasing this year’s heroes.

 

Net Neutrality

 

What is Net Neutrality?

“Net neutrality” is the term used to describe the concept of keeping the Internet open to all lawful content, information, applications, and equipment. There is increasing concern that the owners of the local broadband connections (usually either the cable or telephone company) may block or discriminate against certain Internet users or applications in order to give an advantage to their own services. While the owners of the local network have a legitimate right to manage traffic on their network to prevent congestion, viruses, and so forth, network owners should not be able to block or degrade traffic based on the identity of the user or the type of application solely to favor their interests. — Educause

More information:

 

text: because ISPs shouldn't have VIPs

Action:

On December 14, 2017, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is scheduled to vote to roll back Net Neutrality.  Take action on this issue by calling or emailing your members of Congress.

 

text: because the internet shouldn't have a slow lane

OAWeek- Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act

 

Open in order to ensure public access to research

Today we are highlighting the call for action to support H.R. 3427 / S. 1701,  the bipartisan Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR).

Help pass FASTR and spread the word about the positive effects this legislation will have on research, the academic community, entrepreneurs, students, and the general public. Now is the time to reach out to your Members of Congress and tell them they should support FASTR! SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition)  Read more…

OA Week – Preprint Servers Everywhere

In the last few years there’s been an explosion of preprint servers. Even the original preprint server for physics, math, and computer science, arXiv, recently announced new collections for economics and electrical engineering and systems science. Preprints are publications that have not undergone peer review, and are publicly available even if the peer-reviewed versions are behind publisher paywalls down the road.

  • What are some of the potential advantages and concerns that researchers have about posting their article preprints?
  • What preprint servers are available for my discipline?
  • Will [Journal] accept article submissions that were posted to a preprint server?

 

More below the jump

Read more…

OA Week – Open Access, ResearchGate, and Take Down Notices

Last week the American Chemical Society announced they were sending take down notices (TDNs) to ResearchGate to remove ACS journal articles that authors have posted to ResearchGate. Here is the message ACS sent to their authors, including those at UC San Diego.

Articles that were published under ACS’ AuthorChoice with a CC-BY license are not subject to the TDNs and can be posted to ResearchGate (or reposted if taken down in error).

Here’s some background on the issues between ResearchGate and the journal publishers. ACS will not be the only publisher to send TDNs. The American Anthropological Association recently sent a letter to their members asking them to remove copies of their articles from ResearchGate and Academia.edu, adding that Wiley would be sending a TDN to ResearchGate.

We know many UC San Diego researchers use ResearchGate to collaborate and share information.  However, most of the publisher agreements you sign do specify that the publisher PDF versions of articles should not be posted online.

But you can upload your final accepted manuscripts into eScholarship, and then post those links into ResearchGate. The eScholarship versions of your articles are stable, and are legally free to the world to read. Depositing into eScholarship also meets the “open access repository” criterion of the UC Open Access Policies, while ResearchGate is NOT an open access repository.

Please contact Scholarly Communications Librarian Allegra Swift (scholcomm@ucsd.edu) if you have any questions the UC Open Access Policies and/or depositing your articles into eScholarship.

OA Week – How UC San Diego Library Supports Open Access

Here are four key ways the UC San Diego Library (and UC Libraries as a whole) supports open access for faculty, students and staff. Please contact Allegra Swift, our Scholarly Communications Librarian, if you would like more information about any of these or need further assistance. Contact: scholcomm@ucsd.edu.

  • Financial Support for Publishing Scholarly Monographs with UC Press/Luminos
  • APC Discounts/Waivers to Publish in Full or Hybrid Open Access Journals
  • Supporting Open Access Monographs with Knowledge Unlatched
  • UC Open Access Policies and Support for Depositing Articles into eScholarship

Details on each are below the jump.

Read more…

It’s International Open Access Week, Oct. 23-29!

Today kicks off  International Open Access Week! The UC San Diego Library is joining the conversation about the importance of openly available scholarship by sharing Open Access tools, news, and advocacy opportunities in order to actively support the full scholarly communication lifecycle.

Open In Order to Reuse!

We are kicking off #OAWeek with opportunities to learn more about Open Access, tools to facilitate and share your research as widely as possible, and actions to take to influence policy to safeguard public access to research and scholarship. 

What is Open Access?  Read more…

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