New Popular Science Reading – September 2018

Some new popular science books to start the fall quarter.

You can find these and the rest of the 500-book (or so) collection on the main (2nd) floor in the Geisel Library building west wing, near the Research Assistance Desk and New Books shelf.

Many of the books on order already have links to records in the Library catalog, so if there’s one on that list that catches your attention, you can place a Request on the book and be the first to read it when it arrives.

New Popular Science Books

BrowZine Pilot Extended Through June 2019 – Stay Current with Your Favorite Journals

The Library has renewed BrowZine, our web/app-based service to help keep up with the latest articles from your favorite scholarly, peer-reviewed journals, for another year.

With BrowZine, you can:

  • Create a customized list of up to 64 scholarly journals that you want to “follow,” from hundreds of publishers across all disciplines (arts, humanities, sciences, engineering, social sciences).
  • Access your “bookshelf” from the web, or from iOS/Android tablets and smartphones, synced across your devices.
  • Be notified when new articles are published.
  • Save articles for later reading (including offline), organize the articles into collections, integrate with bibliographic management software to export references, and more.

Please contact Teri Vogel if you have questions or feedback about using Browzine. We also have an FAQ on our guide.

BrowZine image

New Popular Science Reading – June 2018

Lots of new popular science books added just in the last few weeks, including UC San Diego Professor Brian Keating’s Losing the Nobel Prize.

You can find these and the rest of the collection on the main (2nd) floor in the Geisel Library Building West Wing, near the Research Assistance Desk and New Books shelf, arranged by call number for easier browsing.

Many of the books under the “On Order” tab already have links to records in Roger, so if there’s one on that list that catches your attention, you can place a Request on the book and be the first one to read it when it arrives.

Book covers from new popular science books

UC San Diego Library Launches Food for Fine$ Drive, Waiving Library Fines for Food Donations

Food for Fine$ 
Sunday, May 27- Saturday, June 9 
Geisel Library & Biomedical Library buildings

Bring food items to donate to either Library Front Desk between May 27 to June 9 (Weeks 9 & 10) for $2 per item off your library fines from Spring Quarter. All donated items go to UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry.

Guidelines

  • Fines eligible  for dismissal include course reserve and recall overdues, billing fees, and processing fees (no replacement charges)
  • Fines must be from the current term: Spring Quarter Weeks 1-8
  • Earn credits to a maximum of $40
  • Fines already paid may be credited
  • Food donations accepted at Geisel & BLB Front Desks
  • Small, individually-wrapped items in a larger bundle will count as one item (e.g. fruit cups in 4-pack)

Most Needed Items

  • Cereal, oatmeal, rice, pasta/sauce
  • Canned meats (tuna, chicken, ham)
  • Dry or canned beans
  • Peanut butter or granola bars
  • Canned soup or cooking oils
  • Canned fruits or vegetables

Read more…

UC San Diego Library’s ‘Food for Fine$’ Program Waives Overdue Fees for a Good Cause

The UC San Diego Library is teaming up with the UC San Diego Triton Food Pantry to offer students a unique alternative to paying recall or reserve library fines with nonperishable food donations.

In support of the food pantry, the Library’s Food for Fine$ is a new initiative encouraging students to offer food donations to receive a $2 credit per eligible item toward their existing fines for recent overdue Library materials.

“This initiative demonstrates the Library’s commitment to the UC San Diego community by providing needed relief to some students who might otherwise skip a meal to save money,” said Kymberly Goodson, program director for Spaces, Lending, & Access (SLA). “We’re thrilled about this partnership with the Food Pantry. It’s something we’ve never done at the Library, and we hope we can continue it in the future.”

To participate, students can drop off nonperishable foods at the Geisel or BLB Front Desks, including canned meats, canned vegetables, boxes of cereal, cooking oils, and much more (see details of eligible donations and fines here). No glass containers will be accepted and food cannot be repackaged, damaged, opened, or expired. Food for Fine$ kicks off May 27 and runs through June 9.

“Only fines incurred in Weeks 1 through 8 of Spring Quarter will be credited by donated goods, up to a $40 maximum,” said Goodson. “Alternately, participants can receive a credit for already paid fines from this time period.”

The UC San Diego Library joins a network of other universities with similar programs, such as UC Irvine Libraries, U-T at Arlington, and Texas A&M. Food for Fine$ originated in public libraries as a way to further contribute to their communities while also providing a way for library users to decrease or pay their fines and begin using their library cards again.

“We’ve seen an increase in students using the pantry as tuition costs rise. We currently serve over 700 students per week. A 2012 UC Undergraduate Experience Survey showed 25 percent of UC San Diego students ‘often’ skip meals to save cash,” said Sherlock Li, manager at the Triton Food Pantry. “With summer around the corner, Food for Fine$ is a great way for students to clear their cupboards before moving out and keep the Food Pantry stocked.”

The Triton Food Pantry was launched by Associated Students in February 2015 to ensure the academic success of students of all backgrounds. All registered students with a valid UC San Diego identification card can visit the pantry once per week to get up to 10 points worth of food. Fresh produce is also available to supplement students’ needs.”

For more information about the Food for Fine$ program, contact staff at either the Geisel or BLB Front Desks.

Weeklong Summer Training Program for Scholarly Communications Starts July 30

125 participants attended the 2017 FSCI at UC San Diego

 

Do you want to be part of a growing community that aims to transform and improve the future of research communication and e-Scholarship? Then join us for the second installment of the Force11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI) from July 30 to August 3, 2018 at the MET Building on the UC San Diego campus. The program, hosted by the UC San Diego Library, provides learning opportunities for both the expert and the novice in scholarly communication.

The five-day intensive summer training institute is designed to help researchers, students, administrators, librarians, post docs and others navigate the ever-changing and increasingly complex scholarly communications landscape. FSCI will incorporate intensive coursework, seminar participation, group activities, lectures, and hands-on training taught by worldwide leading experts in various aspects of scholarly communication. Participants will attend courses on a wide range of topics including author carpentry, bad publishing, reproducible code and data, software citation, public humanities and more.  Read more…

New Popular Science Reading – May 2018

So many new popular science books.

You can find these and the rest of the collection on the main (2nd) floor in the Geisel Library Building West Wing, near the Research Assistance Desk and New Books shelf, arranged by call number for easier browsing.

Many of the books under the “On Order” tab already have links to records in Roger, so if there’s one on that list that catches your attention, you can place a Request on the book and be the first one to read it when it arrives.

book jackets

A New Reality: A Vision of Hope for a World in Transition


A New Reality: A Vision of Hope for a World in Transition

A Discussion & Book Signing with Psychiatrist Jonathan Salk
Thursday, May 24 • 5:30-7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Free admission, RSVP recommended.

In the new book, “A New Reality: Human Evolution for a Sustainable Future,” Jonathan Salk and co-author David Dewane take a look at the problems presented by population growth and changing human values. The book is a revised version of an earlier publication Jonathan wrote with his father, visionary scientist Jonas Salk, who developed the polio vaccine.

More than 40 years ago, Jonas Salk understood that we are at a unique moment in the history of humankind. Population growth has begun to slow and is trending toward equilibrium. This change is accompanied by an equally significant change in human values — a shift from those based on the unlimited availability of resources, unremitting growth, excess, independence, competition and short-term thinking to those based on limits, balance, interdependence, cooperation and long-term thinking. This transition is the source of the far-reaching tension and conflict happening in the world today.

Salk argues the way through this difficult time is to understand its basis and to focus on new values that will be of the greatest benefit both to individuals and humankind. He adds with population equilibrium societies are more focused on cooperation rather than individual excesses and are in harmony with nature.

“A New Reality” delivers a message of both caution and hope. Readers across the social and political spectrum will find it a reasoned and balanced counterpoint to current social and political trends. Its elegant design and perspective will appeal to general readers, policymakers, millennials, baby boomers, teachers and students, filling a need for a work of positivity and wisdom in otherwise bleak times.

This event is free and open to the public.

Workshop: Acquisition, Processing, and Analysis of Declassified CORONA Satellite Imagery

Corona Workshop 2018 flyer

The UC San Diego Center for Cyber-Archaeology and Sustainability at the Qualcomm Institute and the UC San Diego Library are hosting a free workshop May 15 – 16, 2018 that will explore the technical aspects and research applications of declassified, Cold War-era CORONA satellite imagery. In operation from 1960-1972, the CORONA satellite program collected over 860,000 images across the entire globe, all of which are now publicly available through the USGS. These extraordinary, high-resolution images preserve a unique picture of the world as it appeared a half-century ago, and have become a critical research tool in archaeology, environmental science, geography and other disciplines. The workshop is led by Jesse Casana, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College. The workshop will take place in the Geisel Library.

Workshop: Acquisition, Processing, and Analysis of Declassified CORONA Satellite Imagery

Funded by the Corona Atlas project itself, this will be a great opportunity to learn about this dataset and the methods that the instructors have developed to analyze it. Please see the attached flyer and distribute to any of your staff and students that might be interested.

Registration is required as space is limited. For more information and registration, visit the website.

JSOE Research Expo – Library Prize Winner

Congratulations to Andrei Pissarenko, this year’s winner for “Best Use of the Engineering Literature,” an award given out by our engineering librarians every year at the Jacobs School of Engineering Research Expo. Andrei is a 3rd year PhD student in Marc Meyers’ group in MAE.

A Simscape Based Mesostructural Model of Skin Mechanics (abstract)

Andrei Pissarenko, with his poster.

Andrei Pissarenko, with his poster.

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