“The Legacy of Jonas Salk” Exhibit on Display at Geisel Library thru Jan. 10, 2016


Pictured above is Jonathan Salk, who is on the receiving end of the polio vaccine, being administered by his father, in 1955.

Fall 2015 marks the close of world-renowned scientist Jonas Salk’s centenary year. To mark the occasion, the UC San Diego Library is presenting “The Legacy of Jonas Salk,” an exhibition of materials from the Jonas Salk Papers, which will be on display in Geisel Library through January 10, 2016. The papers—which comprise more than 600 linear feet (or nearly 1000 boxes)—were donated to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections in 2013 by Salk’s sons, Peter, Darrell, and Jonathan, all of whom—like their father—trained as physicians and are involved in medical and scientific activities.

According to Lynda Claassen, director of the Library’s Special Collections & Archives Program, the papers document Jonas Salk’s professional and scientific activities from the mid-1940s to his death in 1995.  Especially well-documented are activities related to the development of the Salk polio vaccine in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and the founding of the Salk Institute. The papers cover general correspondence, files relating to polio, his writings and philosophy, photographs, artifacts—including two dictating machines—personal writings, and various research materials.

“The archive represents the enormous scope of our father’s creativity and productivity,” said Jonathan Salk. “This collection of his papers and the insight to be gained into how he approached and solved problems might be his greatest legacy. He would be pleased to find that his life’s work was continuing to do good for the world. Read more…

Oct 10: Opening Reception – Paul Espinosa Film Series

This event has sold out. To attend one of the other events in the series, click here.


Film Series to Celebrate Acquisition of Filmmaker Paul Espinosa’s Papers

The University of California, San Diego Library has acquired the papers of Paul Espinosa, an award-winning independent filmmaker, well known for his documentary and dramatic films focused on the U.S.-Mexican border region, which helped to increase awareness about a host of immigration and cross-cultural issues. Espinosa, who has been the recipient of eight Emmy Awards for his films, recently retired from Arizona State University, where he was on the faculty at the School of Transborder Studies. He continues to make films through his company, Espinosa Productions, now located in San Diego.

Pancho Villa and John PershingThe Library will be celebrating the acquisition of Espinosa’s archive with a Fall film series, beginning with an opening reception on October 10 in Geisel Library, and film screenings on October 23 at the University’s Cross Cultural Center, November 4 at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park, and November 10 at the Museum of Photographic Arts (MOPA). All events are free and open to the public. (Click here to RSVP)

“We are honored to have acquired Paul Espinosa’s papers, which will be widely used on this campus,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “Our Library collections have particular strengths on California and Baja California history, as well as on Chicano culture and activism. The Espinosa Papers will certainly strengthen and complement these materials.”

According to Lynda Claassen, the Library’s director of Special Collections & Archives, Espinosa’s papers are rich, diverse, and plentiful.  The materials include approximately 200 linear feet (200 boxes) documenting Espinosa’s more than 35 years of filmmaking, including interviews, research materials, photos, and correspondence, as well as films scripts, DVD’s, and video.

“As a longtime resident of San Diego, where so much of my professional work was created, I was delighted that my papers found a home at UC San Diego, where scholars will have access to this extensive archive for decades to come,” said Espinosa.”

Espinosa has written, directed, and produced many national documentary films for PBS, including:  The Lemon Grove Incident, (1986), In the Shadow of the Law (1988), Uneasy Neighbors (1990), The Price of Renewal (2006), California and the American Dream (2006), The U.S.-Mexican War: 1846-1848 (1998), Ballad of an Unsung Hero (1985), Taco Shop Poets (2004), The Border (1999) and …and the earth did not swallow him (1995), an American Playhouse adaptation of a Tómas Rivera novel, among others.

Lemon Grove class photoThe Lemon Grove Incident, produced and written by Espinosa, traces the unsuccessful efforts of the Lemon Grove School District in the 1930’s to establish a separate school for Mexican students.  The film was described by The New York Times as “the story of the nation’s first successful legal challenge to school segregation, 14 years before the Supreme Court outlawed separation by race in the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education.” The film will be screened on October 23, from 7 to 9 p.m., at the UC San Diego Cross Cultural Center as part of the 25th anniversary celebration for the University’s Department of Ethnic Studies.

Read more…

Creativity, Culture and Community: The Legacy of Jonas Salk


Join us for an evening of conversation and celebration to mark the close of Jonas Salk’s centenary year and the opening of the Jonas Salk Papers at the UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections.

Click here to RSVP

The UC San Diego Library and the Jonas Salk Legacy Foundation are hosting a conversation with Peter Salk; Jonathan Salk; Gary Robbins, Science Editor, San Diego Union Tribune; and Mary Walshok, author of the book Invention & Reinvention: The Evolution of San Diego’s Innovation Economy on Friday, October 30, from 7 – 9 PM at the UC San Diego Faculty Club. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. An exhibition of materials from the Salk Papers will be on view in Geisel Library from Oct. 30 through Dec. 12, 2015; selected items will be on display at the Faculty Club event.

Sept. 18 Dinner in the Library Focuses on ‘Building for the Future’


The University of California, San Diego’s 12th annual Dinner in the Library will take place Friday, Sept. 18 in the university’s iconic Geisel Library building. The event, which is open to the public, will celebrate the theme “Building for the Future,” with proceeds supporting the UC San Diego Library’s collections, services and learning spaces. Festivities will include dinner and cocktails, a silent auction and a keynote talk from Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library.

“The UC San Diego Library plays a vital role in supporting the university’s world-renowned research and instruction,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “Private support from Dinner in the Library helps ensure that the Library remains at the leading-edge of the nation’s academic libraries. We are pleased to have Sarah Thomas of Harvard Library join us to share her insights on the enduring value and impact of libraries.”

Dinner in the Library attendees will hear from Thomas on a topic that is of critical interest to readers and lovers of knowledge and libraries. Her talk, “Back to the Future with the Brave New Library,” will focus on how libraries are changing to meet evolving scholarly and public needs in new and often unexpected ways. Before joining Harvard in 2013 to head the university’s vast library system, Thomas served as Bodley’s Librarian, overseeing the libraries of the University of Oxford, including the renowned Bodleian Library, which dates back to the 12th century. She was the first woman and non-British citizen to hold Oxford’s head librarian position, and published “The Bod Squad” in Transforming the Bodleian (2012), detailing her experiences. Previously, Thomas served as the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University.

“We are thrilled to host Sarah Thomas for a talk addressing the future of libraries in the digital age,” said Brian E.C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “Like many libraries across the nation—and around the globe—we see library facilities and resources being used just as much as in the past, but in different ways.  It is critical that academic libraries such as the UC San Diego Library continue evolving to meet the ever-changing needs of our students, scholars and researchers. I can think of few speakers, if any, better suited than Sarah Thomas to expound upon this evolution—and to do so with wit and grace.”

Read more…

Hundreds of Seuss Fans Visit Geisel to Celebrate New Dr. Seuss Book


Hundreds of Dr. Seuss fans paid a visit to Geisel Library on July 28 to celebrate the release of  the new Dr. Seuss book, What Pet Should I Get?. At the event, the UC San Diego Bookstore sold a limited number of copies of the new book, which was released publicly by Random House on July 28.

Along with the book sale, the Library’s annual exhibition of original drawings and sketches by Theodor Seuss Geisel, “Boids & Beasties,” was on view. The exhibition included original materials from What Pet Should I Get?.

What Pet Should I Get? is based on materials that were donated in 2013 by Audrey Geisel to the UC San Diego Library’s Dr. Seuss Collection, the primary repository for Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative works. The Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses more than 15,000 items in its Dr. Seuss Collection, including original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs and memorabilia, documenting the full range of Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative achievements, from his high school activities in 1919 up until his death in 1991.

Photos from the event can be viewed here.

Library to Hold Book Launch for New Dr. Seuss Book July 28


Join us on Tuesday, July 28 in the Geisel Library’s Seuss Room Foyer from 11 am – 1 pm to celebrate and buy a copy of the new Dr. Seuss book, What Pet Should I Get?. The book, based on recently discovered materials given to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections’ Dr. Seuss Collection, will be released by Random House on July 28. Copies of the book will be sold by the UC San Diego Bookstore and some of the original materials used in the book will be on display. “Boids & Beasties,” the annual exhibition of original drawings and sketches by Theodor Seuss Geisel, is also currently on view and includes original materials from the new book. Lemonade and animal crackers will be served!

Seuss Room Screening – 1915 Expo

Expo movie poster

Bring your lunch for a virtual picnic in the Park with a vintage screening of the original opening ceremonies of Balboa Park!

Step back in time 100 years to relive the moment when San Diego commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal and launched the City as an international venue.

Join us in the Seuss room on Friday, June 19, 2015 for refreshing drinks starting at 12:30 p.m. Then grab a seat on a picnic blanket to enjoy your lunch while viewing two exquisite vintage silent films, A Glimpse of the San Diego Expo (1915) and Fatty and Mabel at the San Diego Exposition (1915). As a special treat, the Fatty Arbuckle film will be shown on a 16mm projector at the appropriate silent film speed of 16 frames per second. Both screenings will be accompanied by live music from the era and other sounds from the Library’s very own musical group, Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra (TTPO).

This special screening is in conjunction with San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives on display in Geisel Library (2nd Floor West). Sheet music found in this exhibit will also be performed at the event by TTPO.

‘San Diego Welcomes the World’ Salutes Centenary of Panama–California Exposition of 1915


San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, which commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal, and launched the City as an international venue. The construction of the Panama Canal was an immense engineering feat, dramatically cutting the distance and cost of international shipping by opening a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It also proved to be an excellent opportunity for enhancing San Diego’s profile–as it would become the first port north of the Panama Canal on the West Coast of the United States.  The event also provided San Diego leaders with the impetus for transforming Balboa Park from an undeveloped, arid property, into a lush and distinctly Spanish paradise. The 1915 Exposition led to both the greening of Balboa Park as well as the creation of the park’s cultural institutions and stunning Spanish Revival architecture.

The exhibition, which is on display on the main floor in Geisel Library (2nd floor, West Wing) until July 5, 2015, includes images of some of the few permanent structures designed for the fair, including the California Tower and dome, the Cabrillo Bridge, and the Spreckels Organ Pavilion. Other items in the exhibit include souvenir books and postcards, newspaper articles, sheet music, a special student admittance pass, maps of the Canal, and more.

Archive for New Poetry Previews Audio Clips from Blackburn Collection


Join us for this “virtual reading” that will feature newly digitized recordings from the large archive of poetry readings created by poet and translator Paul Blackburn [1926-1971]. Blackburn played an important role in the New York poetry community, and his archive has been described as “the most comprehensive oral history of the New York poetry scene between the late 1950s and 1970.”

Thursday, May 7
4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Seuss Room, Geisel Library

The readings that Blackburn recorded are now being digitized by the UC San Diego Library. They were indexed soon after their acquisition in 1973 by UC San Diego Literature Professor Michael Davidson, who had recently been hired as the first curator of the Archive for New Poetry and who was instrumental in acquiring the final segment of Blackburn’s papers. During his tenure as curator, he built the Archive for New Poetry into one of the world’s preeminent collections documenting experimental post-WW II poetry and has continued to promote it and to advise the Library on its subsequent development. The event will honor Davidson’s many contributions to the Library over the past 40 years. An exhibit of his own works and manuscripts will be on display at the reception following the reading. This event is free and open to the public.

Read more…

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