New Exhibition of Dr. Seuss’s Original Drawings

The UC San Diego Library is proud to feature a new exhibition of selected original drawings by beloved children’s author, Dr.Seuss Boids BeastiesTheodor Seuss Geisel, on the main floor of the Geisel Library at UC San Diego through October 19, 2014.  The new exhibit, Dr. Seuss’s Boids & Beasties, showcases his whimsical and fantastical creatures, and creative talent.

The Library’s Special Collections & Archives is home to the renowned Dr. Seuss Collection. The Dr. Seuss Collection contains original drawings, sketches, proofs, notebooks, manuscript drafts, books, audio- and videotapes, photographs, and memorabilia. The approximately 8,500 items in the collection document the full range of Dr. Seuss’s creative achievements, beginning in 1919 with his high school activities and ending with his death in 1991.

The Dr. Seuss Collection is often featured in library exhibitions, including those celebrating the naming of Geisel Library in December, 1995, and annually for Dr. Seuss’s birthday on March 2.

Categories: Events & Exhibits, Special Collections Comments: 0

UC San Diego Library Receives Personal Papers of Jonas Salk

Media Contact:  Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667 or ddavies@ucsd.edu

The University of California, San Diego Library has become the official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk, noted physician, virologist, and humanitarian, best known for his development of the world’s first successful vaccine for the prevention of polio.              Salk1

The papers—which constitute almost 600 linear feet (or nearly 900 boxes)—were recently donated to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections by Salk’s sons, Peter, Darrell and Jonathan, all of whom, like their father, trained as physicians and are involved in medical and scientific activities.

Salk2While recognized world-wide for his significant contributions, Jonas Salk is particularly noted locally for his founding of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies adjacent to UC San Diego and the impact this had on the city’s metamorphosis into a major center for biomedical and scientific research and discovery. The Institute will celebrate the Jonas Salk Centenary in the fall of 2014 and, as part of this notable milestone, the Library will hold a major exhibition of the Salk Papers and collaborate with the Institute on other celebratory events.

“It is a great honor for the Library to be the official repository for Jonas Salk’s papers,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “The UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses the papers of some of the world’s most prominent and accomplished scientists, including Francis Crick, Stanley Miller, and Leo Szilard, as well as Nobel Laureates Harold Urey, Hannes Alfven, and Maria Goeppert Mayer. The papers of Jonas Salk are an excellent complement to these materials.”

The Salk papers constitute an exhaustive source of documentation on Salk’s professional and scientific activities. The papers cover the period from the mid-1940s to his death in 1995; best documented are activities largely related to the development of the Salk polio vaccine in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and the founding of the Salk Institute. The papers cover general correspondence, files relating to polio, his writings, photographs, artifacts—including two dictating machines—personal writings, and various research materials.   Salk4

The collection includes correspondence with a number of prominent scientists and others,  including Basil O’Connor and officers of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis/March of Dimes; immunologists Thomas Francis and Albert Sabin; physicist and biologist Leo Szilard; mathematician and philosopher Jacob Bronowski; architect Louis Kahn and other important figures in the worlds of art, science, education, public administration, and humanitarianism.

Salk came to La Jolla following a career in clinical medicine and virology research. After obtaining his M.D. degree at the New York University School of Medicine in 1939, he served as a staff physician at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He then joined his mentor, Dr. Thomas Francis, as a research fellow at the University of Michigan. There he worked to develop an influenza vaccine at the behest of the U.S. Army. In 1947, he was appointed director of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of  Pittsburgh School of Medicine, where he began to put together the techniques that would lead to his polio vaccine.

Salk3Salk’s research caught the attention of  O’Connor, then president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, and the organization decided to fund his efforts to develop a killed virus vaccine against the most frightening scourge of the time—paralytic poliomyelitis. Given the fear and anxiety that polio caused during the first half of the century, the vaccine’s success in 1955 made Salk an international hero, and he spent the late 1960s refining the vaccine and establishing the scientific principles behind it.

Salk chose San Diego as the site for what was to become the Salk Institute for Biological Studies after a year touring the country for the right location. In June, 1960, through a referendum, the citizens of San Diego overwhelmingly voted to make a gift of 27 pueblo lots in the La Jolla area, just west of the new University of California San Diego campus, for Salk’s dream. The Institute began operation in temporary quarters in 1963, and permanent buildings designed by architect Kahn were completed in 1967. The complex soon gained international fame for its extremely modern and austere design, which now enjoys a cult following among architecture and design buffs. Salk served as the Institute’s director until 1975.

 

UC San Diego Library Receives Gift of New Dr. Seuss Materials

Annual birthday celebration set for March 3rd with exhibit of new materials.   DrSeuss7_2014

Every year the University of California, San Diego Library, the world’s repository for the original works of Dr. Seuss, holds a campus birthday party to celebrate the March 2 birthday of Dr. Seuss. The party will be held at noon on Monday, March 3, but it’s the UC San Diego Library that is getting the gift–a gift of more than 1500 additional items donated by Audrey Geisel from the personal archive of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known to the reading public as Dr. Seuss.

“I am pleased about more of Ted’s work and memorabilia being in Mandeville Special Collections at Geisel Library,” said Audrey Geisel. “His Seuss history will be preserved for posterity.”

DrSeuss4_2014 The recently donated materials, which are being added to the Dr. Seuss Collection in the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections, include hundreds of rough sketches and drawings for a variety of unpublished projects such as “Cat Ballooning,” “The Pet Shop,” “Bee Watches,” “How Welk Can You Spelk,” “The Clock Book,” and “Arabian Adventures.” Geisel’s ink drawings for a version of “Daisy Head Mayzie” are among the materials donated, as is “Tex McTarbox and the Fountain of Youth,” the latter, in Geisel’s words “the treatment for half of a screen play which I thought had great possibilities for mirth.”

“The UC San Diego Library is thrilled to receive this addition of creative materials to our fabulous Dr. Seuss Collection,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “We greatly treasure our Dr. Seuss materials and view Ted Geisel as much more than one of the most popular authors of children’s books. He is also a symbol of extreme creativity and DrSeuss1_2014 innovation, values that are part of this University’s DNA.”

In honor of Dr. Seuss’s birthday celebration, a selection of the new materials are now on display at Geisel Library and will continue to be exhibited until the end of March.

Images copyrighted by © Dr. Seuss Enterprises

UC San Diego Press Release

Public Beta Launch: UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections Website

We are excited to announce the public beta launch of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website.

The Digital Collections website contains more than 65,000 digital items that include documents, photographs, audio, video, and data sets that are unique to the UC San Diego Library.                          DAMS4

Unique Digital Collections include the Baja California Collection, the Dr. Seuss Collection, the Missions of Alta California, the Spanish Civil War Collection, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology, and UC San Diego History.

The Digital Collections also contain more than 6,000 digital objects of research data gathered by campus researchers as part of UC San Diego’s The Research Cyberinfrastructure Program.

We are in a test phase before replacing our current site: https://libraries.ucsd.edu/digital/ Help us by being a beta tester. We encourage you to use the “Help” menu of the site to report bugs or to submit any suggestions for improvement.

The new Digital Collections website incorporates responsive web design so you can browse the site on all your devices. Browse and discover the unique collections contained in our Digital Collections website at: Browse by Collection.

And, bookmark the UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website at:  http://library.ucsd.edu/dc

 

Materials Documenting the Birth of the Nuclear Age to Be Digitized

The papers of Leo Szilard, one of the nation’s most influential scientists, will soon be digitized by the University of California, San Diego Library, thanks to a $93,000 grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).                                                                             LeoSzilard_Einstein

The Library’s Leo Szilard materials, which extend from 1938 to 1998, chronicle the birth of the nuclear age, the work of the Manhattan Project—which Szilard helped to create—and the beginnings of the study of molecular biology. While the physicist and inventor played an essential role in the development of the atomic bomb, he was a passionate advocate for global arms control and argued for using the bomb as a deterrent, not as a force for destruction.

More than 50,000 items will be digitized, including some 550 photographs, as well as several hours of video and audio recordings. The papers include correspondence with numerous fellow scientists with whom Szilard collaborated, including Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, Jonas Salk, Edward Teller, and Linus Pauling. Also included are a variety of biographical materials, such as immigration papers and passports—Szilard was born in Budapest, emigrating to the U.S. in 1938– and biographical articles and sketches.

For more information, visit http://libraries.ucsd.edu/news/releases/2014/szilard.html

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