Weeklong Summer Training Program for Scholarly Communications Starts July 30

125 participants attended the 2017 FSCI at UC San Diego

 

Do you want to be part of a growing community that aims to transform and improve the future of research communication and e-Scholarship? Then join us for the second installment of the Force11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI) from July 30 to August 3, 2018 at the MET Building on the UC San Diego campus. The program, hosted by the UC San Diego Library, provides learning opportunities for both the expert and the novice in scholarly communication.

The five-day intensive summer training institute is designed to help researchers, students, administrators, librarians, post docs and others navigate the ever-changing and increasingly complex scholarly communications landscape. FSCI will incorporate intensive coursework, seminar participation, group activities, lectures, and hands-on training taught by worldwide leading experts in various aspects of scholarly communication. Participants will attend courses on a wide range of topics including author carpentry, bad publishing, reproducible code and data, software citation, public humanities and more.  Read more…

UC San Diego Library Wraps Up Holocaust Living History Workshop Lecture Series May 30



Join us for the last installment of the 2017-2018 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) with Eva Clarke on Wednesday, May 30 from 5-7 p.m. in the Seuss Room. This event is free and open to the public.

Eva Clarke

What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Clarke was one of three “miracle babies” who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva’s chances of survival were extremely slim. Against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK and settled in Cardiff. Nowadays, Eva regularly talks to audiences, and her remarkable story has been featured in the British and American media. She and her mother are among the protagonists of Wendy Holden’s book “Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance, and Hope.”

Every year the popular HLHW invites high-caliber speakers to campus to share inspiring stories that broaden our understanding of the past, foster tolerance and preserve the memories of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. This year we heard from individuals such as international lawyer Philippe Sands and POLIN Museum’s curator Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.

If you missed the opportunity to attend a workshop, you can watch recordings of selected talks for research through the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections and UCTV.

A New Reality: A Vision of Hope for a World in Transition


A New Reality: A Vision of Hope for a World in Transition

A Discussion & Book Signing with Psychiatrist Jonathan Salk
Thursday, May 24 • 5:30-7 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Free admission, RSVP recommended.

In the new book, “A New Reality: Human Evolution for a Sustainable Future,” Jonathan Salk and co-author David Dewane take a look at the problems presented by population growth and changing human values. The book is a revised version of an earlier publication Jonathan wrote with his father, visionary scientist Jonas Salk, who developed the polio vaccine.

More than 40 years ago, Jonas Salk understood that we are at a unique moment in the history of humankind. Population growth has begun to slow and is trending toward equilibrium. This change is accompanied by an equally significant change in human values — a shift from those based on the unlimited availability of resources, unremitting growth, excess, independence, competition and short-term thinking to those based on limits, balance, interdependence, cooperation and long-term thinking. This transition is the source of the far-reaching tension and conflict happening in the world today.

Salk argues the way through this difficult time is to understand its basis and to focus on new values that will be of the greatest benefit both to individuals and humankind. He adds with population equilibrium societies are more focused on cooperation rather than individual excesses and are in harmony with nature.

“A New Reality” delivers a message of both caution and hope. Readers across the social and political spectrum will find it a reasoned and balanced counterpoint to current social and political trends. Its elegant design and perspective will appeal to general readers, policymakers, millennials, baby boomers, teachers and students, filling a need for a work of positivity and wisdom in otherwise bleak times.

This event is free and open to the public.

Walk-In Expert Consultations Now Offered at the Digital Media Lab

We’re excited to announce that the Digital Media Lab is piloting a new program to offer walk-in expert consultations with our experienced student staff!  Starting Tuesday, May 2 and extending through the end of spring term, the DML will offer walk-in expert consultations for select software and workflows.

Tuesdays from 2 to 10 p.m. with DML Assistant Janice Zhao. Get help with:

Janice Zhao is a 4th year Computer Science student with wide technical skills and an affinity for artistic 3D modeling and digital physics simulations.

Schedule an appointment with Janice here.

Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. with DML Assistant Alex Chen. Get help with:

Alex Chen is a 4th year Product Design Major who loves photography and customizing his own gear with 3D printing.

Schedule an appointment with Alex here.

HERSTORY: The Legal History of Chinese-American Women

Between Two Consensus: The Spanish Civil War in the Current Spanish Novel

Between Two Consensus: The Spanish Civil War in the Current Spanish Novel
Wednesday, May 2 • 3-5 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Sponsored by the Literature Department, History Department and UC San Diego Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

In the last few years, many novels dealing with the Spanish Civil War appeared in the literary market in Spain. This was a strange phenomenon: the society that was born after Franco’s dictatorship was a society without memory. The democratic Spanish society that was born during the so-called “Transition” was based on silence and oblivion agreements. In this context, the Spanish Civil War turned into a taboo: it could open old wounds and it could wake up the old ghosts of the war. The Transition spirit urged the Spanish people to look ahead, towards European progress and modernity. But, suddenly, the society changed and started to look back. In the year 2000, the “Asociación por la recuperación de la memoria histórica” (Association for the Recovery of Historical Memory) was founded, and many novels dealing with the Spanish Civil War were published. It was great news; apparently, literature had started to fight against the silence and oblivion established during the Democratic Transition. Seemingly, these novels broke the Transition agreements. However, when we start to read these novels we realize they do not question the Transition agreements, they also strengthen them. This presentation will analyze how these novels reproduce two consensus: the Transition consensus and the Neoliberal consensus.

UC San Diego Physicist Flexes ‘BICEP’ to Introduce Controversial New Book

Brian Keating discusses how his work on a telescope at the South Pole led to a story about the world’s most prestigious award

In 1895 Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite sat at a desk in Paris and secretly wrote out his last will and testament. In that document, the man known to many as “the Merchant of Death” stipulated that his vast wealth be distributed in the form of yearly prizes to those who “have conferred the greatest benefit to mankind.” In the following years, the Nobel Prize would become the world’s most prestigious honor. Each December, thousands of the world’s elites arrive in Stockholm to dine on reindeer with the King of Sweden in celebration of the achievements of humankind.

Yet, as the University of California San Diego’s Brian Keating explains in his new book “there’s something rotten in Sweden.” Voted one of Amazon’s Best Books of the Month, “Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition, and the Perils of Science’s Highest Honor”  is described as a shot across the bow from Keating and a plea to reform the award that has captivated generations, but often comes at a high price.

Keating will be reading and discussing the book at several events in southern California, including a conversation at UC San Diego on April 25 at 5:30 p.m. in Atkinson Hall Auditorium, co-hosted by the Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination and the UC San Diego Library, a source for several of the historical photographs in the publication. A book signing and reception will follow the discussion. The event is free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. All books purchased at the event will receive a limited edition gold-plated bookmark, commemorating the book launch. Seating is not guaranteed. RSVP, here. Read more…

A Panel Discussion on LGBTQ Health Disparities

 

Celebrate Out and Proud Week! On April 26th, 2018 from 12:00pm-1:00pm in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room, The UC San Diego Library, the LGBT Resource Center, and the UC San Diego LGBT Staff & Faculty Association invite you to hear from UC San Diego health care providers about their experiences serving our community and issues relating to disparities in LGBTQ health service.

Data shared in a 2015 position paper in the Annals of Internal Medicine*  identified some of the key challenges in LGBT healthcare policy and delivery:

  • LGBT people have lower overall access to care, and are less likely to be insured than their heterosexual counterparts.
  • Transgender people face additional challenges to accessing care including stigma and high cost of trans-specific care. As a result, 50% have injected hormones through illegal means.
  • Lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons are approximately 2.5 times more likely to have a mental health disorder than heterosexual men and women.

Please join our lunchtime presentation and discussion. Learn about a range of topics including San Diego County physicians’ attitudes toward LGBT patients, mental health disparities in the LGBT community, clinical support for transgender children, and providing culturally competent HIV care. Panelists will present for approximately 10 minutes each, and there will be a Q&A session to follow.

Our panelists include:

  • Gregory E. Koch, Psy.D., Psychologist at UCSD’s Muir College
  • Maja Marinkovic, MD, Co-Director of the Gender Management Clinic at Rady Children’s & Endocrinologist
  • Chris Matthews, MD, Director of Research Infrastructure, Owen Clinic and Professor of Clinical Medicine
  • Amy Sitapati, MD, Medical Director, La Jolla Internal Medicine, and Clinical Professor of Medicine

A light lunch will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there!

Contact Korey Brunetti (kgbrunetti@ucsd.edu) or Alanna Aiko Moore (aamoore@ucsd.edu) for further details.

 

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility in Scholarly Communication

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility 
in Scholarly Communication
Thursday, April 19 • 2-4 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Shifting the scholarly culture toward open access, open data and open workflow is partly an incentives problem, partly an infrastructure problem, and partly a coordination problem.  The Center for Open Science (COS) is a non-profit technology and culture change organization working on all three. Central elements of COS’s strategy are to provide policy, incentive, and normative solutions that are applicable across institution, funder, publisher, and society stakeholders, and to provide efficient implementations of those solutions with open-source public goods infrastructure that is branded and operated by the communities themselves (OSF).

Brian Nosek is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, which operates the Open Science Framework. COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit, a multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition–thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one’s intentions and goals. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature’s 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information about the event, contact Serafin Raya at s1raya@ucsd.edu.

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

2018 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 • 3:00 – 5:00 pm
Geisel Library, Classroom 2

This year, the UC San Diego Library is participating in the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon! Join us on Wednesday, March 14 in Geisel Library, Classroom 2 for an editing session to help improve Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism.

If you’re inexperienced – that’s ok! Tutorials will be provided for the beginner Wikipedian, along with reference materials and refreshments. There are Windows computers available in the library computer lab, but feel free to bring your laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation. For the editing-averse, we urge you to stop by to show your support. If possible, please create a Wikipedia account before the event. All are welcome!

Art+Feminism is a campaign improving coverage of cis and transgender women, feminism and the arts on Wikipedia. From coffee shops and community centers to the largest museums and universities in the world, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself and do-it-with-others campaign teaching people of all gender identities and expressions to edit Wikipedia. Less than 10% of editors on Wikipedia are women. Wikipedia is the largest and most popular general reference work on the internet with more than 40 million articles in more than 250 different languages. The fact is when we don’t tell our stories or participate in the ways our history is preserved, it gets erased. Gaps in the coverage of knowledge about women, gender, feminism, and the arts on one of the most visited websites in the world is a big problem and we need your help to fix it.

For more information about the event, contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Events Calendar

<< Oct 2017 >>
SMTWTFS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4