#blacklivesmatter : a century of resistance to state-sanctioned violence

Exhibit:
On display February 2 – March 31, 2015
Geisel Library West, main floor
Open to all

Recently, the tragic deaths and failures of justice in the cases of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Eric Garner have captured headlines and sparked protests around the country. But for every widely publicized incident of racially motivated violence, hundreds go unreported or under-reported. The work of the Civil Rights movement, while far-reaching, remains incomplete.

To this day, territories of de facto segregation, practices such as stop and frisk, unreported police brutality, and other forms of racial oppression persist. Rather than “Judge Lynch” terrorizing black, poor, and minority populations, sources of violence are often state-legitimated, perpetuated by increasingly militarized police departments, practices such as racial profiling, brutal acts that go unchecked, and a court system that fails to mete out equal justice.

From the get-go, America’s promise of liberty and justice wasn’t really for all. But it’s an ideal we cling to. Throughout this country’s history, alongside incidents of racially motivated violence, injustice, and brutality, are the stories of those who resisted oppression, sometimes risking all by taking to the streets, the courts, and the legislatures to forward a vision of a fair and just society. Today we stand alongside those activists, continuing the work begun long ago, as we affirm that black lives matter.

Highlighting the library’s rich resources, materials have been gathered from our print and online collections to shed light on these issues.

 

Speaker Series Event:

Activism, Policing, and Black Lives Matter

12:00 – 1:30 pm, February 25, 2015
Seuss Room, Geisel Library building

Open to all. Refreshments will be served.

Join us for a conversation with four faculty: Zeinabu Davis (UCSD Communication), Dayo Gore (UCSD Ethnic Studies), Cesar Rodriguez  (CSUSM Sociology) and Daniel Widener (UCSD History).  This panel discussion raises questions, examines the roots of injustice, and offers avenues of exploration and information that might help to galvanize the outrage of recent protests into a sustained movement.

Categories: Events & Exhibits, Uncategorized Tags: Comments: 0

Black History Month Events Kick off Feb. 3rd

The UC San Diego Library will join the campus in a month-long celebration of Black History Month on February 3, with an exhibit on “A Century of Black Life, History, and Culture” and “100 Rainbow Years,” in Geisel Library, co-sponsored with the African American & African Studies Research Center (AAASRC). The exhibit illustrates the intersections of families and communities evolving toward global social justice, cooperation, and universalism. According to AAASRC Director Benetta Jules Rosette, a professor of Sociology, Josephine Baker’s “Rainbow Tribe” was an inspiration, for the exhibit, which features historic images of the families of AAASRC Board members, who moved from slavery to freedom and from slave holders to promoters of social justice. The exhibit, will be on view through the end of month in Geisel West, 1st floor, demonstrates the patchwork of American and global societies over the last 100 years, and reflects AAASRC’s 20-year commitment to global human rights, justice, and cooperation.

BJR 14

 

 

 

 

On February 12, the Library and AAASRC will present “The Kansas City Style: A Marriage of Blues & Jazz with Jeannie Cheatham” at 3:30 p.m. in the Geisel Library Seuss Room. International jazz legend Jeannie Cheatham will give a presentation on Kansas City blues, featuring live music, engaging storytelling, and recently rediscovered video. Jeannie, who has been credited along with her late husband Jimmy Cheatham, will perform on piano with a jazz trio, underscoring the readings of special guests. Jeannie’s autobiography, Meet Me With Your Black Drawers On, documents her numerous collaborations with some of the great musicians of the past sixty years—including the big bands of Cab Calloway and Count Basie. Jeannie Cheatham, who played piano for these and other jazz icons, was trained in both the classical and famous Kansas City jazz traditions. Jeannie and Jimmy Cheatham, who headed up the UC San Diego Music Department’s jazz program for many years, toured the world with their Sweet Baby Blues Band. An exhibit on the Kansas City style, which will feature Jimmy Cheatham’s trombone, will also be on view in Geisel Library during the month of February.

BJR 9

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: Comments: 0

Annual Turkey Calling Show

Annual Turkey Calling Show.  Free! Kids welcome!         Turkeygraphic2
Wednesday, November 26, 2014 at 12:00 noon
Seuss Room, Geisel Library, UC San Diego

Presented in the style of an old-time live radio broadcast, attend
this fast-paced show to get instruction on how to use turkey calls
and find out how the American turkey became popular in European art. Special note: with all due respect to the East Coast turkey, visit us at this event and find out why the West Coast turkey rules!

TurkeyCallingScottHosted by  Scott Paulson and featuring the Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra. Special guests, all coming from various corners the Library and UC San Diego, include Aislinn Sotelo as “radio ballet teacher” and
Melanie Peters as “story lady.” Featuring actor Glen Motil  with musicians Christian Hertzog & Kirk Wang.

“Paulson’s brand of G-rated fun, a sort of modern day morphing of
Captain Kangaroo & Spike Jones, is always lively and at times
wonderfully chaotic.”   Los Angeles Times

For more info, contact: spaulson@ucsd.edu  (858) 822-5758, or  http://library.ucsd.edu

Categories: Uncategorized

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century

“That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century,” a new exhibit on display in UC San Diego’s Geisel Library, features a wide Ballots NewHampshire1884RepPresStCounty-190range of voting ballots or tickets that were used during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The ballots are the property of Samuel Kernell, a professor of Political Science at UC San Diego and co-author (with Erik J. Engstrom) of the new book “Party Ballots, Reform, and the Transformation of America’s Electoral System.” The book explores the fascinating and puzzling world of 19th and early 20th century American elections.

Ballots NewHampshireDem1882ExampleOfPaster-215According to Kernell, up until the late 1820′s, voting by voice was the prevalent practice for electing candidates for public office. A number of factors made it necessary to transition to a paper ballot system of voting, including the profusion of elective offices with too many voters voting for too many offices, both of which made voice voting impractical. The new practice of voters publicly submitting a party ballot, however, ushered in numerous possibilities for party patronage and outright voter fraud. With a single ballot — or ticket, as ballots were referred to then– affecting so many offices, party politicians sought to mobilize as many supporters as possible. And, since the voting was public, they could confirm that a voter voted “correctly,” which enabled party bosses to promise services, jobs, and even direct bribes–$5 gold pieces in the 1880 election–were offered up to persuade supporters to go to the polls. By 1880, some presidential elections were generating a nearly 80 percent turnout. It was not until the last decade of the 19th century, that Australian ballot reform swept the nation. This led to the private voting and state-supplied ballot listing of the various political parties’ candidates for each of the offices, which reflects our current voting process.

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century is on display through December 22nd on the main floor of Geisel Library.

Categories: Uncategorized

Geisel Library Closing Early September 12, 2014

On Friday, September 12, 2014, the UC San Diego Library’s annual Dinner in the Library fundraiser will be held in the Geisel Geisel_LibraryLibrary building. To allow for this event:

  • At 2p.m.:  The 1st floor (Lower Level) West Wing of Geisel will close to library users. This area includes the Media Services Desk and workstations, the Brody Collaborative Study Space, and the nearby Computer Commons.
  • At 4p.m.:  The entire Geisel Library building will close to library users.  Library users are encouraged to plan their work around this Geisel Library schedule change.   Geisel will reopen for regular hours on Saturday, September 13.

On September 12, the Biomedical Library Building  will maintain its regular Friday hours. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this early closing may cause.

Feed Your Appetite at Dinner in the Library Sept. 12 with Julia Child Biographer

evite banner2

Evening set in Geisel Library benefits the UC San Diego Library

The University of California, San Diego’s 11th annual Dinner in the Library will take place Friday, Sept. 12 in the Geisel Library building, with proceeds benefiting the UC San Diego Library’s collections and services, which support student and faculty research and teaching. The evening’s festivities will include dinner and cocktails, a silent auction, and a keynote talk from internationally recognized biographer Noël Riley Fitch on “Sharing Julia Child’s Appetite for Life.”

Fitch wrote the first authorized biography of Julia Child, entitled “Appetite for Life.” As part of the evening, Fitch will give attendees a revealing look at Child’s incredible life. A culinary icon, Child is credited with bringing French cuisine to the American public with her cooking shows and famous cookbook, “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.”Thanks to a generous gift from the American Institute of Wine & Food (AIWF), a national organization founded by Child and Robert Mondavi, the UC San Diego Library is home to the AIWF’s Culinary Collection, which includes more than 6,500 volumes and other food and wine-related materials dating back to the 17th century.

“The UC San Diego Library provides the foundation for the campus to advance knowledge and discoveries in everything from public policy and the arts, to healthcare and science,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “Private support for the UC San Diego Library provides essential resources to help meet the information needs of our researchers, physicians, artists, students and community members.”

The UC San Diego Library provides access to more than seven million digital and print volumes, journals and multimedia materials.The Library’s vast resources, collections, and services are accessed more than 87,500 times each day via the Library’s website.

“The UC San Diego Library ranks among the top 25 public academic libraries in the nation,” said Brian E.C. Schottlaender, UC San Diego’s Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “It is support from our dedicated donors, alumni, and friends, that helps ensure that the Library can continue to advance the university’s leading-edge research and world-class education.”

As part of the evening, Dorothy Gregor will be honored with the 2014 Geisel Citation for Library Philanthropy. Gregor has played an integral role in the growth and success of the UC San Diego Library. She served as university librarian from 1985 to 1992, and led the Library through a period of great change, overseeing the underground addition to the Geisel Library building. Since then, she has continued to provide valuable assistance, including establishing the Dorothy D. Gregor Endowment for general support of the Library’s distinguished collections.

“Dorothy’s thoughtful patronage serves as an inspiration to others who understand the importance of academic research libraries in the pursuit of transformational discovery and knowledge,” said Schottlaender.

Sponsors of the 2014 Dinner in the Library include: The Dr. Seuss Fund at The San Diego Foundation; Don and Maryann Lyle; John A. Berol; Karen B. Dow; James Forbes, Ph.D., and Julianne Larsen; UC San Diego Alumni; Joel and Nancy Dimsdale; Elsevier B.V.; The Evans Foundation; Union Bank; EBSCO Information Services; James M. Hall; Jeanne Jones and Don Breitenberg; Standish and Theresa Fleming; Anne S. Otterson and United Capital Management.

Tickets for Dinner in the Library are available for $225 per person or $1,800 per table. Cocktails and the silent auction begin at 5:30 p.m., with dinner and Fitch’s talk following at 7 p.m. For more information or to register for the dinner, please visit: library.ucsd.edu/about/dinner.

Events Calendar

<< Feb 2015 >>
SMTWTFS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Twitter Feed