Netflix for Checkout!

roku netflix

Need to view a movie we don’t have in our normal collection? Want to binge watch House of Cards without buying a Netflix subscription? The Library now offers two Roku media streaming devices with attached Netflix accounts. They are available for 3 day checkouts at the Geisel 1st floor Media Desk. Rokus can be used with and HDMI display, and are configured to work anywhere on campus where the UCSD_Guest wifi network is available. You can also connect to your own home wifi through the device’s settings menu.

This service is not intended for classroom use.

Please send questions and comments to LearningSpaces@ucsd.edu

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Annual Turkey Calling Show

Annual Turkey Calling Show.  Free! Kids welcome!         Turkeygraphic2
Wednesday, November 26, 2014 at 12:00 noon
Seuss Room, Geisel Library, UC San Diego

Presented in the style of an old-time live radio broadcast, attend
this fast-paced show to get instruction on how to use turkey calls
and find out how the American turkey became popular in European art. Special note: with all due respect to the East Coast turkey, visit us at this event and find out why the West Coast turkey rules!

TurkeyCallingScottHosted by  Scott Paulson and featuring the Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra. Special guests, all coming from various corners the Library and UC San Diego, include Aislinn Sotelo as “radio ballet teacher” and
Melanie Peters as “story lady.” Featuring actor Glen Motil  with musicians Christian Hertzog & Kirk Wang.

“Paulson’s brand of G-rated fun, a sort of modern day morphing of
Captain Kangaroo & Spike Jones, is always lively and at times
wonderfully chaotic.”   Los Angeles Times

For more info, contact: spaulson@ucsd.edu  (858) 822-5758, or  http://library.ucsd.edu

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That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century

“That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century,” a new exhibit on display in UC San Diego’s Geisel Library, features a wide Ballots NewHampshire1884RepPresStCounty-190range of voting ballots or tickets that were used during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The ballots are the property of Samuel Kernell, a professor of Political Science at UC San Diego and co-author (with Erik J. Engstrom) of the new book “Party Ballots, Reform, and the Transformation of America’s Electoral System.” The book explores the fascinating and puzzling world of 19th and early 20th century American elections.

Ballots NewHampshireDem1882ExampleOfPaster-215According to Kernell, up until the late 1820’s, voting by voice was the prevalent practice for electing candidates for public office. A number of factors made it necessary to transition to a paper ballot system of voting, including the profusion of elective offices with too many voters voting for too many offices, both of which made voice voting impractical. The new practice of voters publicly submitting a party ballot, however, ushered in numerous possibilities for party patronage and outright voter fraud. With a single ballot — or ticket, as ballots were referred to then– affecting so many offices, party politicians sought to mobilize as many supporters as possible. And, since the voting was public, they could confirm that a voter voted “correctly,” which enabled party bosses to promise services, jobs, and even direct bribes–$5 gold pieces in the 1880 election–were offered up to persuade supporters to go to the polls. By 1880, some presidential elections were generating a nearly 80 percent turnout. It was not until the last decade of the 19th century, that Australian ballot reform swept the nation. This led to the private voting and state-supplied ballot listing of the various political parties’ candidates for each of the offices, which reflects our current voting process.

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century is on display through December 22nd on the main floor of Geisel Library.

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