Research Smarter: Fall Workshops @ The Library

Fall quarter we’re hosting free workshops at the Library for UC San Diego students, faculty and staff. Taught by UCSD Student ComputerLibrarians, learn how to effectively use PowerPoint, research databases, search for patents, manage your research electronically, and more.

For workshop descriptions and to register, please visit:
http://libraries.ucsd.edu/services/instruction/workshops-at-the-library.html

Fall Workshops:

PowerPoint Basics
Thu, Oct 16, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
Biomedical Library Building

PowerPoint Enhancements
Thu, Oct 23, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
Biomedical Library Building                                                Classroom library

PubMed – Beyond the Essentials
Wed, Oct 29, 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Biomedical Library Building

PowerPoint Posters
Thu, Oct 30, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
Biomedical Library Building

Faculty CV Clinic
Thu, Oct 30, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

Patents and Patent Searching
Tue, Nov 4, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

PowerPoint Presentations
Thu, Nov 6, 12:00 – 2:00 pm              BLB Geisel Collage
Biomedical Library Building

Managing Citations
Thu, Nov 13, 12:00 – 1:30 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

RefWorks
Wed, Nov 19, 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Biomedical Library Building

EndNote
Thu, Dec 4, 12:00 – 1:30 pm
Geisel Library Building, Classroom 1

Free Summer Workshops at The Library

This summer we’re offering an assortment of workshops taught by UC San Diego librarians. These workshops focus on research databases and tools that will help you find and organize information more effectively and efficiently.  ETS05.1

Workshops are free and open to UCSD students, staff, and faculty. The PubMed workshops are open to all. San Diego area health professionals may also attend the workshops space permitting.

View the full schedule of workshops, sign-up, and research smarter:

http://libraries.ucsd.edu/locations/bml/learn/workshops-at-bml.html

Asian Pacific American Edit-a-Thon

wikipedia-apa1

Events:

Open Lab: Thursday, May 8th, Geisel Library, Room 276, noon – 1pm

APA Edit-a-thon: Saturday, May 10th, Geisel Library, Room 276, 10am – noon; or participate virtually!

Refreshments will be served! Open to the public!
May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Get ready for the Wikipedia Asian Pacific American (APA) edit-a-thon! The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is organizing an editing event for enriching the presence of cultural, historic, and artistic information on Wikipedia about APA experiences. Wikipedia is one of the most widely-used resources in the world for general information. Whether you’re a seasoned Wikipedian, an APA studies scholar, or completely new to all of this, your help is needed!

The first Wikipedia edit-a-thon dedicated to APA content, this project will occur as physical events on May 10, 2014 in New York City and Washington DC, as well as by proxy ­ with participants taking part from all throughout the world. The UC San Diego Library is hosting a local space in the Geisel Library building, Room 276, from 10am to noon.

The UC San Diego Library is also hosting an Wikipedia open lab session on Thursday, May 8, noon – 1pm, Geisel Library Classroom 2 (276). We can help you set up your accounts and review the editing process, so you’ll be ready to participate, in-person or virtually, for the main event on Saturday, May 10th.

Articles to work on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/Wikipedia_APA

Wikipedia Resources:

We strongly recommend signing up for a Wikipedia account before the edit-a-thon!

Wikipedia Cheat Sheet

Wikipedia Tea House ( a friendly place for new editors to ask questions)

 

Asian American Resources:

UCSD Library Online Resources (restricted to UCSD Network):

Asian American Drama– Asian American Drama contains 186 plays by 35 playwrights, together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies, and more.

Japanese-American Relocation Camp Newspapers
This collection, consisting of 25 individual titles, documents life in World War II internment camps.

Online Resources:

South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA)
an independent national non-profit organization working to create a more inclusive society by giving voice to South Asian Americans through documenting, preserving, and sharing stories that represent their unique and diverse experiences.

FOREASt
(Free Open Resources for East Asian Studies)– relevant scholarly resources published on the Internet by individual scholars, academic institutions, cultural institutions (libraries, museums, archives), government agencies, and occasionally commercial entities. Currently FOREASt provides access to over 300 free databases and journals on East Asia “published” in North America, Europe, Australia and, of course, East Asia.

Asian Voices
Documents relating the Asian American experience from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s.

Camp Harmony Exhibit
Large numbers of the Japanese American community were sent to American internment camps after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. This exhibit tells the story of Seattle’s Japanese American community and one of those camps.

Columbia River Basin Ethnic History Archive: Chinese Americans
Primary documents that tell the story of ethnic groups along the Columbia River Basin (encompassing areas of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and and British Columbia).

Columbia River Basin Ethnic History Archive: Japanese Americans
Primary documents that tell the story of ethnic groups along the Columbia River Basin (encompassing areas of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and and British Columbia).

DENSHO: The Japanese American Legacy Project
Site documents and archives oral histories and photos from Japanese Americans who were incarcerated during World War II. Nonprofit organization has a mission to educate, preserve, collaborate and inspire action for equity.

Japanese American National Museum
The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by preserving, interpreting and sharing the experiences of Japanese Americans.

Japanese American Relocation Digital Archive
Documents the experience of Japanese Americans in WWII internment camps. Primary source materials include photographs, documents, manuscripts, paintings, drawings, letters, and oral histories.

Korean American Digital Archive
The KADA brings together documents, photographs and sound files that document the Korean American community during the period of resistance to Japanese rule in Korea and reveal the organizational and private experience of Koreans in America between 1903 and 1965.

Southeast Asian Archive
The Archive collects materials relating to the resettlement of Southeast Asian refugees and immigrants in the U.S., and the culture and history of Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. There is a special focus on Southeast Asians in Orange County and California.

The Chinese in California, 1850-1925
This site “illustrates nineteenth and early twentieth century Chinese immigration to California through about 8,000 images and pages of primary source materials…These documents describe the experiences of Chinese immigrants in California, including the nature of inter-ethnic tensions. They also document the specific contributions of Chinese immigrants to commerce and business, architecture and art, agriculture and other industries, and cultural and social life in California.”

Categories: Workshops & Classes

Holocaust Living History Workshop Series Continues

UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW), co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the Judaic1389.5 Holocaust B Studies Program, will present two final lectures in its “Journeys, Memories, Echoes” series. The HLHW is an educational outreach program whose aim is to broaden understanding of the past, to foster tolerance, and to preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. Members of the campus community and the public have an opportunity to meet with survivors and scholars and to learn more about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest compendium of Holocaust video testimony.

On Wednesday, May 7th, Ian Hancock will talk about his ground-breaking research Porrajmos: The Romanis and the Holocaust. The Judeocide is by far the best studied aspect of the Nazi agenda of persecution and destruction, while other victims have received comparatively little popular and scholarly coverage. It is a little known fact, for example, that the Holocaust claimed anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million Romani lives. Hancock will address this tragedy the Romani and Sinti refer to as “the Devouring” (Porrajmos).

HLHW3_hancockbookHancock received his PhD from London University, and for the last four decades has taught English and linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also the director of the Romani Archives and Documentation Center. Through his scholarship and activism he has successfully drawn attention to the centuries-long discrimination of the Romani and has helped to reassess the Romani identity within the Western world. He has represented the Romani people at the United Nations, served as a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, and is currently a state commissioner on the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. Hancock’s published works include The Pariah Syndrome, We are the Romani People, and most recently, Danger! Educated Gypsy.

While the Porrajmos has generated relatively few written records, ever more Holocaust victims HLHW2_bookcontinue to come forward with their stories. On Wednesday, May 14th, Ruth Kluger will read from her best-selling book, Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered. Kluger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis’ “model ghetto.” Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Kluger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Kluger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write.

This lecture is made possible by through the generosity of Phyllis and Dan Epstein. The lecturer will be introduced by UC San Diego history professor Frank Bless.

Please note times and locations: Parrajmos: The Romanis and the Holocaust will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room on the UC San Diego campus. Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered will take place in The Great Hall. Both lectures are from 5 – 7 pm. Driving and parking directions are available on the HLHW website.

An integral part of the Holocaust Living History Workshop is the Visual History Archive. The UC San Diego Library is one of only three university libraries on the West Coast to have access to the Archive, which is administered by the Shoah Foundation Institute at the University of Southern California. In addition to the over 52,000 original testimonies from Holocaust witnesses and survivors, additional video testimonies with survivors of the Nanjing massacre have recently been added. The testimonies are in the original Mandarin with English subtitles. Students and members of the public can access the Archive from any computer on the UC San Diego campus.

For more information about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact program coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://library.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Research Smarter: Spring Quarter Workshops @ The Library

We offer a variety of free workshops designed to help you research more efficiently and effectively.   ETS05

Spring quarter learn how to manage citations using RefWorks or Endnote, search for and find patents, maximize the power of Excel, and find research literature using the PubMed database.   Browse the full schedule and register for workshops online.

Try a workshop and research smarter with us!

Scopus Workshop, 3/12

Please join us for a workshop to learn how Scopus, a citation/abstract database of 50+ million records, with additional tools to track, analyze and visualize research. It’s strongest journal coverage is in science and engineering, but it also indexes social science, arts, and humanities journals.

Wednesday, March 12, 1-2pm, Geisel Library, Room 274
Registration link here, and seating is limited
Faculty, students, staff welcome

At the workshop you’ll learn how to use Scopus to:

  • Find the latest research in your field
  • Find other researchers doing work like yours
  • Find the best journal to submit your work
  • Find out who is citing your work

This workshop will also cover how to use Scopus to track, analyze and visualize research, how Scopus uses ORCID to solve the name ambiguity problem in research and scholarly communications, and how to use Mendeley as a reference manager to make the process of writing papers more efficient.

The UC Libraries have trial access to Scopus for 2014. Your feedback is essential in helping us determine if we can and should continue access beyond this year. We encourage you to try Scopus and send us your feedback.

Patent Workshop on February 5 at Biomedical Library Building

Einstein blackboard - learn about patentsPatent and Patent Searching Workshop

Wednesday, February 5
1:00pm – 3:00pm
Biomedical Library Building – Computer Classroom

Patents are critically important in protecting intellectual property and companies are investing fortunes in them to safeguard their inventions.   It is estimated that between 2010 and 2012 in the smartphone industry alone, over $20 billion was spent on patent purchases and litigation.  Without the protection afforded by patent coverage, technological innovation would dry up.

 In this class, you will learn how patents protect your intellectual property and what rights they confer, what to expect in the patent application process, how to read and interpret patent documents, and why international patents matter. Skip Cynar, Licensing Officer at the UCSD Technology Transfer  Office (TTO) will be on hand to talk about working with the TTO to manage and protect your inventions. Finally, learn about free web search engines you can use to discover if your invention has already been patented.  Even if you don’t have an invention in process, this class will give you valuable insight into how patents work.

 Staff & faculty register through UC Learning CenterSearch on “patents” in the search box.

 Students register at http://ucsd.libcal.com/event.php?id=568650

 Future classes (registration not yet open):
Thursday, May 8, 10:00 am – noon, Geisel Library, Room 274
Wednesday, August 20, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Geisel Library, Room 274

Events Calendar

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