2019 Black History Month

Cookbooks by Early Black Californians 1900-1936
with Dr. Hanna Garth

Monday, February 11, 2019
Geisel Library, Seuss Room
Noon – 1:00 PM
Doors open at 11:45am. Light refreshments will be served.

 

The theme for this year’s Black History Month is Black Migration: The Movement of African People Across the Diaspora. Join us for an engaging lecture by Dr. Hanna Garth on “Cookbooks by Early Black Californians 1900-1936.”  This talk documents culinary practices in early patterns of Black migration to Southern California.  This talk draws on an analysis of two cookbooks, The Federation Cookbook: a Collection of Tested Recipes by the Colored Women of Southern California (1909) and Eliza’s Cookbook Favorite Recipes of the Negro Culinary Art Club (1936).  Based on this analysis this talk illuminates the forms of cooking that were central to early Black migrants to Southern California, tracing the culinary influences from other regions of the United States.

Dr. Hanna Garth is a sociocultural and medical anthropologist specializing in the anthropology of food. Her work addresses issues of inequality and structural violence, with regional interests in Latin American, the Caribbean, and the United States.  She received her PhD in Anthropology from UC Los Angeles in 2014, and an MPH focused in Global Health from Boston University in 2006.  Dr. Garth has been a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, and a Mellon Mays fellow.  She is co-convener of the UC San Diego Food and Society Research Group.

 

Feeding Body & Soul: Migration and Black Culinary Traditions

Feeding Body & Soul: Migration and Black Culinary Traditions Exhibit
In the early 1900s, looking for better opportunities, many African Americans left the South and headed to the North and West.  As they settled into new neighborhoods, one constant was the food shared around the kitchen table and the special dishes that no family or community gathering could do without. Over time and distance, black culinary heritage has mingled the flavors of exile and home, drawing together families, defining community. Come to Geisel Library for a taste of this history and enjoy an exhibit that offers up a delectable sampling of cookbooks and a celebration of black cuisine and food culture. This exhibit, located in Geisel Library’s 2nd Floor (West Wing), will be on display from February 1 – 28, 2019.

This event is free and open to the public. No reservation required. For more information, contact Gayatri Singh (gasingh@ucsd.edu).

Tuskegee Airmen and the Great Western Migration, 1940-1970 Exhibit

Tuskegee Airmen and the Great Western Migration, 1940-1970 Exhibit
February 1 – 28, 2018
Geisel Library, main floor, west wing

A group of Tuskegee Airmen in uniform standing in front of a military plan

In honor of Black History Month, the UC San Diego Library is hosting the Tuskegee Airmen and the Great Western Migration, 1940-1970 Exhibit.  The story of the Tuskegee Airmen who settled in the western United States often gets lost in the telling of the larger Tuskegee Airmen narrative. The western migration is one of the most pivotal moments in African American history as people sought out better economic opportunities and an escape from racialized violence in the south.

African Americans left the southern United States in record numbers during the Second Great Migration, a period spanning over thirty years between World War II through the emergence of the Black Power Movement in the late 1960s to the early 1970s.  An estimated five million African Americans left the south between the early 1940s to the late 1970s.  This massive movement of African Americans is estimated to have been more than twice the size of the first Great Migration that occurred during the early 20th Century through World War I. It reshaped the social, political, cultural, and economic future of not only African Americans, but also the United States

The Tuskegee Airmen, the first African American military aviators in the US Military, were an important part of this migration story.  Their western migration was similar to many other African American service members who left the south in significant numbers after their military service during the three decades.  They moved west for economic opportunities in the growing defense industry, military bases, and other industries that had recently opened up opportunities for African Americans.  They also moved west seeking an escape from the brutality of southern racism.

The exhibit will cover three main time periods from 1940-1970:

  • World War II
  • The Western Migration of African Americans
  • The Emergence of the Black Middle Class in the Western United States

This traveling exhibit is on loan from the UC Riverside Library. The Special Collections & Archives houses the notable Tuskegee Airmen Collections.

To learn more, check out the following resources from the UC San Diego Library’s collections:

Books:

Films:

 

The Kansas City Style: A Marriage of Blues & Jazz

International jazz legend Jeannie Cheatham presents a treatise on Kansas City Blues, featuring live music, engaging storytelling, and recently rediscovered video. Jeannie will perform on piano with a jazz trio, underscoring the readings of special guests.

Jeannie’s autobiography Meet Me With Your Black Drawers On, reveals a life and career with all the great musicians of the past sixty years, from the Big Bands of Cab Calloway (“Minnie the Moocher”), Grover Mitchell (Count Basie band leader), Bill Tole (“New York, New York”), Big Mama Thornton (“Hound Dog”) to George Lewis (MacArthur “Genius” award winner). Jeannie Cheatham played piano for them all. She was trained in both the classical tradition and in the famous Kansas City jazz tradition by some of its greatest musicians: Pete Johnson, Jay McShann and Count Basie. Jeannie and her husband Jimmy Cheatham revived the Kansas City style and, with their Sweet Baby Blues Band, toured the world. Join Jeannie and surprise guests at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 12, 2015 in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library.

This free Black History Month event is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the African & African-American Studies Resource Center and the UC San Diego Department of Music.

Meet Me With Your Black Drawers On is available through online retailers.
During the month of February, an exhibit about the Kansas City style will be on view at Geisel West, 1st floor. Jimmy Cheatham’s trombone will be on display, accompanied by an essay relaying the significance of the instrument, written by Jeannie Cheatham.
Contact: Scott Paulson, spaulson@ucsd.edu or 858-822-5758.

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