Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21

faculty_victorOn February 24, the University of California, San Diego Library will sponsor Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21, featuring climate change policy expert David Victor and students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who attended COP21, and will provide their insights on the process and the outcome. The event is free and open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library.

David Victor, a professor of international relations at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy & Strategy, has been a participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) proceedings since the IPCC’s inception, and was a party to the negotiations in Paris. School of Global Policy and Strategy students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who accompanied Victor at the Paris talks, were part of the large UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography delegation, and helped to advocate for an increased recognition of the role of oceans in the new climate. Victor, who has been an astute observer of and an active contributor to climate change negotiations since the late 1980s, believes there are very specific reasons why COP21, while not without its flaws, was more productive than any climate negotiations in the last 20 years.

Victor, co-director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, is the author of Global Warming Gridlock, his 2011 book which argued that a “radical rethinking” of global warming policy was needed in order to make international law more effective in bringing about international compacts to reduce global emissions. The Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21), held in December 2015, employed the “bottom-up approach” Victor advocated in his book, producing an international agreement that sets both short and long term targets for reducing emissions worldwide. Last year, Victor also wrote a paper for the journal, Nature, which pushed for a more streamlined and less constricted focus that would better integrate the social sciences in the climate change policy process, to more effectively address related social, political, and psychological issues. Read more…

Geisel Library Exhibit Sheds Light on Chinese Workers Who Built Transcontinental Railway

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Chinese work group for the Great Northern Railway, c. 1909. (Photo courtesy of Royal British Columbia Museum)

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental, produced by the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford University, is on display through February 29, 2016 in Geisel Library on the University of California, San Diego campus. The exhibit tells the undocumented story of thousands of Chinese migrants, who played an instrumental role in the construction of the nation’s first transcontinental railway in the 1860s.

In addition to the partnership with the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford, the Chinese American Library Association’s Task Force on Chinese Railroad Workers, which seeks to increase awareness and appreciation for the contributions of Chinese Americans, helped to bring the exhibit to the campus.

A reception will be held on Friday, January 22, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library, to celebrate the opening of the exhibit at the UC San Diego Library, the first institution to host the exhibit after its debut last summer at Stanford University and the Chinese Historical Society of America. The reception will include remarks from: Hilton Obenzinger, associate director of the Chinese Railroad Workers Project and a Lecturer in American Studies & English at Stanford University; Simeon Man, a scholar of Asian American Studies and an assistant professor in UC San Diego’s Department of History; and Murray Lee, Curator of Chinese American History for the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum. The event is free and open to the public. To make a reservation, please visit: http://lib.ucsd.edu/ironroadRead more…

Holocaust Living History Workshop Series Continues with “Holocaust Journeys”

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Work by German-Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon who died at Auschwitz in 1943.

The 2015-16 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) series continues this January with six compelling authors, films, and other events highlighting the diverse “Holocaust Journeys” of survivors and others recounting their personal stories. Co-sponsored by the University of California, San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program, the HLHW lecture series invites local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars to share their personal stories and memories with students and interested members of the public. The goal of the program is to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

All events are free and open to the public, and are held on Wednesdays on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5 to 7 p.m., with some exceptions (as noted below).

January 13Think Only of Today: A Documentary Film about the Life of Holocaust Survivor, Max Garcia (With Alberto Lau and Robert Schneider)

Think Only of Today traces the life of Max Garcia from his childhood in Amsterdam, through the Holocaust, and finally to his immigration and life in the United States. Born in 1924, Max was interned in Westerbork before being deported to Auschwitz and later Mauthausen. The documentary, which follows Max’s ordeal through war and incarceration, also explores the effect of the Holocaust on succeeding generations. Interviews with Max’s children and grandchildren reveal the different ways individuals from each generation have grappled with the burden of such a searing experience.

February 10Exile in Ecuador (With Moselio Schaechter)

Moselio Schaechter spent his childhood in Mussolini’s Italy. Thanks to a transit visa for Portugal and the United States, the Schaechters made it to Quito, Ecuador in January 1941. Over the next nine years, Moselio struggled to accommodate his Jewish identity with a nascent South American self. In this talk he shares memories of his youth, his experience in the Ecuadorian Jewish refugee community, his life in the U.S., and his subsequent visit to his old “home.” Schaechter is a distinguished professor emeritus at Tufts University and an adjunct professor in microbiology at SDSU and UC San Diego. Read more…

Beyster Family Donates Papers of SAIC Founder J.R. Beyster to UC San Diego Library

2-BobBeysterPapers of the late J. Robert “Bob” Beyster, founder of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and a business innovator who developed a successful blueprint for entrepreneurial, employee-empowered companies, are being donated to the UC San Diego Library by the Beyster family.

Beyster’s papers, which reflect his passion for entrepreneurship and employee-owner enabled entrepreneurial practices, include correspondence, SAIC business records, committee meeting minutes and materials related to employee ownership, as well as records on a broad range of government-funded research and development, including Strategic Air Command during the Cold War, safety of the international space station, critical hull design for a number of U.S. entries in the America’s Cup race, clean-up of Three Mile Island, commercialization of the Internet, and many other transformational programs. The collection will also contain his more than 60 technical publications and a complete record of the numerous awards and recognitions he received for his public service, global leadership in science and technology, and entrepreneurship.

After the materials are processed, the Beyster Papers will be housed in the UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections, where they will be available for use by scholars, researchers and educators. The Beyster family has also provided funding to facilitate the processing of the archival materials to make them available for research and discovery online via the Web. The collection is expected to be made available to the public in 2017. Read more…

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