A Look Back at 30 Years of History: The Beginning of CARE at the Sexual Assault Resource Center

  

For 30 years, UC San Diego’s CARE at the Sexual Assault Resource Center has provided survivor support services and prevention education for campus sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking. Back in 1988, the center was known as the Student Safety Awareness Program and was staffed by one full-time employee and two student interns. Despite being a small team, CARE (Campus, Advocacy, Resources and Education) at the Sexual Assault Resource Center had a big impact. The program was one of the first holistic and stand-alone campus victim services programs within the UC system.

To celebrate their milestone anniversary and to observe Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), the UC San Diego Library has teamed up with CARE at the Sexual Assault Resource Center for an exhibit that will highlight official announcements, press clippings, reference manuals and training materials that illustrate the evolution of this vital program on campus and violence prevention as a national movement. The exhibit will run from Tuesday, April 10 through Thursday, May 31 in Geisel Library West, 1st Floor, near the Research Assistance Desk.

SAAM events on campus include Succulents for SAAM April 17, Friends Supporting LGBTQIA+ Survivors April 18, Denim Day April 25, and more! A full calendar of events can be found hereRead more…

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New Writing Series Features Fiction Writer, Native American Poet and UC San Diego faculty

UC San Diego’s New Writing Series is excited to announce their upcoming readings from Brian Evenson, Lily Hoang, Meliza Bañales and Layli Long Soldier. The events are free and open to the public!

Brian Evenson — Wednesday, April 11, 2018 — Geisel Library, Seuss Room at 4:30 p.m.

Evenson is the author of a dozen books of fiction, most recently the story collection “A Collapse of Horses” and the novella “The Warren.” He has also recently published “Windeye” and “Immobility,” both of which were finalists for a Shirley Jackson Award. His novel “Last Days” won the ALA-RUSA award. His novel “The Open Curtain” was a finalist for an Edgar Award and an IHG Award. He is the recipient of three O. Henry Prizes as well as an NEA Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. His work has been translated into French, Italian, German, Greek, Spanish, Japanese, Persian, Slovenian and Turkish. He lives in Los Angeles and teaches in the Critical Studies Program at CalArts.  Read more…

Special Collections & Archives’ Ledger Art Books Serve as Hands-On Learning Tool for Graduate Students

 

“Driving the Horses” plate from the Koba-Russell Sketchbook. Courtesy of: Plains Ledger Art Digital Publishing Project (PILA).

 

The beauty of Indian Ledger Art isn’t just about depicting Native American history in vibrant colors and powerful compositions, but how it has influenced the next generation of Native American artists.

To Dwayne Wilcox, it’s more than artwork. It connects him to his Native American culture and reaffirms his purpose in the community. Wearing black pants, a striped dress shirt that hangs loose on his frame, and his signature pork pie hat, Wilcox stands in front of an audience speaking softly about his art and gazing earnestly at the Ledger Art drawings in his exhibit.

Dwayne Wilcox

The Lakota Ledger artist met with students and spoke in November at a public gathering hosted by the Library in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. A small collection of Wilcox’s contemporary ledger artwork was on view in an exhibition called Teíč’iȟ iŋla: Practicing Decolonial Love, curated by UC San Diego graduate students. Wilcox was joined by Ross Frank, associate professor of ethnic studies and director of the Plains Indian Ledger Art project (PILA).

Due to increased collector interest, more nineteenth-century ledger books are coming to light. However, sheets are sold individually for thousands of dollars, dispersing them on the market. In the last few years academics have been trying to reassemble book pages. Many of these fine examples of ledger art drawings are now accessible online. PILA has been working since 1995 to digitally preserve Plains Indian Ledger books under one platform to promote research and public access.

“Without trying, this digital project has brought UC San Diego about a million dollars’ worth of original, nineteenth-century Ledger Art books. We have the third largest collection of complete ledger books in the country outside of the holdings at the Smithsonian museums,” said Frank. “The Library’s Special Collections & Archives has eight complete ledger books and another one is on its way. We have a fine example of the work that was done by the 28 artists of the 72 prisoners that were held in Fort Marion in 1875 during the Red River War.”

Pictured left to right: Special Collections & Archives Director Lynda Claassen, Alison Urban, Jessica Fremlan, Melanie West, and Ethnic Studies Associate Professor Ross Frank.

PILA provides graduate students pursuing a doctorate in Ethnic Studies and other programs with hands-on training in research, digital database, and web management. In addition, the Ethnic Studies department offers courses that give undergrads and graduate students the tools to design museum exhibits that incorporate indigenous knowledge.

“It was important to me that the exhibit we created not only be a visual experience but one that prompted critical discourse and engagement among visitors. In providing a space to write or draw thoughts and responses to the exhibit we hoped that a conversation could happen on these pages,” said UC San Diego graduate student Alison Urban. “I love flipping through the book and seeing how the questions we posed through the presentation of modern and historical Ledger Art have activated students to connect with the notion of decolonial love.”

The Library’s physical collection of Ledger Art books continues to grow, albeit slowly, given their scarcity and cost. But they provide a vital teaching and research resource, and the Library will continue to work with Ross Frank and Ethnic Studies to develop and promote these unique cultural materials.

Q&A: UC San Diego Library Supporter Mary Ann Beyster Reflects on Father’s Legacy

From left to right: Mary Ann, Betty, and Jim Beyster celebrated the opening of the Beyster Papers during a reception on April 21, 2017.

The Beyster name is intertwined with the history of San Diego’s entrepreneurial and technology community. The late Dr. J. Robert “Bob” Beyster built Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) from a small scientific consulting firm in the 1960s to a multibillion-dollar defense contractor powerhouse. He was known for his visionary business practices and sophisticated ability to bring out the best in his employees. SAIC grew to become one of the largest employee-owned companies in the nation.

In 2015, the Beyster family donated Bob’s Papers including business records, stock plans, and records of government-funded research to the Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Dr. Beyster’s legacy is now carried on by his daughter Mary Ann through the work she’s doing with entrepreneurship, innovation, and employee ownership in the education system. Of the Library’s valued supporters, few have a background quite as diverse as Mary Ann’s. Not only is she an enthusiastic community leader with 30 years of experience in manufacturing, technical management consulting, and small business innovation, but she’s also a passionate documentary director and producer.

Library staff asked Mary Ann a few questions to learn more about her late father’s legacy and her involvement with the UC San Diego campus.  Read more…

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