Sept. 18 Dinner in the Library Focuses on ‘Building for the Future’

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The University of California, San Diego’s 12th annual Dinner in the Library will take place Friday, Sept. 18 in the university’s iconic Geisel Library building. The event, which is open to the public, will celebrate the theme “Building for the Future,” with proceeds supporting the UC San Diego Library’s collections, services and learning spaces. Festivities will include dinner and cocktails, a silent auction and a keynote talk from Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library.

“The UC San Diego Library plays a vital role in supporting the university’s world-renowned research and instruction,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “Private support from Dinner in the Library helps ensure that the Library remains at the leading-edge of the nation’s academic libraries. We are pleased to have Sarah Thomas of Harvard Library join us to share her insights on the enduring value and impact of libraries.”

Dinner in the Library attendees will hear from Thomas on a topic that is of critical interest to readers and lovers of knowledge and libraries. Her talk, “Back to the Future with the Brave New Library,” will focus on how libraries are changing to meet evolving scholarly and public needs in new and often unexpected ways. Before joining Harvard in 2013 to head the university’s vast library system, Thomas served as Bodley’s Librarian, overseeing the libraries of the University of Oxford, including the renowned Bodleian Library, which dates back to the 12th century. She was the first woman and non-British citizen to hold Oxford’s head librarian position, and published “The Bod Squad” in Transforming the Bodleian (2012), detailing her experiences. Previously, Thomas served as the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University.

“We are thrilled to host Sarah Thomas for a talk addressing the future of libraries in the digital age,” said Brian E.C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “Like many libraries across the nation—and around the globe—we see library facilities and resources being used just as much as in the past, but in different ways.  It is critical that academic libraries such as the UC San Diego Library continue evolving to meet the ever-changing needs of our students, scholars and researchers. I can think of few speakers, if any, better suited than Sarah Thomas to expound upon this evolution—and to do so with wit and grace.”

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Hundreds of Seuss Fans Visit Geisel to Celebrate New Dr. Seuss Book

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Hundreds of Dr. Seuss fans paid a visit to Geisel Library on July 28 to celebrate the release of  the new Dr. Seuss book, What Pet Should I Get?. At the event, the UC San Diego Bookstore sold a limited number of copies of the new book, which was released publicly by Random House on July 28.

Along with the book sale, the Library’s annual exhibition of original drawings and sketches by Theodor Seuss Geisel, “Boids & Beasties,” was on view. The exhibition included original materials from What Pet Should I Get?.

What Pet Should I Get? is based on materials that were donated in 2013 by Audrey Geisel to the UC San Diego Library’s Dr. Seuss Collection, the primary repository for Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative works. The Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses more than 15,000 items in its Dr. Seuss Collection, including original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs and memorabilia, documenting the full range of Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative achievements, from his high school activities in 1919 up until his death in 1991.

Photos from the event can be viewed here.

Audrey Geisel Donates $3 Million to Renovate Geisel Library

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San Diego philanthropist, literacy advocate, and longtime supporter of the University of California, San Diego, Audrey Geisel, has donated $3 million toward the renovation of the university’s iconic flagship building, Geisel Library. The gift kicks off a major initiative to transform and revitalize the interior public spaces of Geisel Library to meet the evolving needs of students, faculty, and other Library users in the digital age. Geisel’s gift will be used to renovate and update the entry level of Geisel Library, which opened in 1972 as the university’s Central Library. In 1995, the William Pereira-designed building—known by many as “the spaceship”—was named in honor of Audrey and her late husband, Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, in recognition of a major gift from Audrey Geisel.

“We are extremely grateful to Audrey for this generous lead gift to launch the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “This will ensure that Geisel Library, a campus and architectural landmark, continues to provide the outstanding services and spaces needed to support today’s students and scholars, as well as members of the local community. Audrey has been one of the university’s most generous and stalwart supporters, and with this gift, the Geisel legacy will continue to shape our future success as a world-class university.”

The UC San Diego Library is ranked amongst the top 25 academic research libraries in the nation, with more than seven million digital and print volumes, journals, and multimedia materials. Library resources provide the foundation of knowledge for many of the groundbreaking discoveries, treatments, and intellectual achievements for which UC San Diego has become renowned. While many of the Library’s information resources are available online 24/7, more than 1.5 million people stream through the Geisel Library and the Biomedical Library buildings each year, and the Library’s vast resources and services are accessed more than 5.7 million times via the Library website.

Audrey Geisel“When I first saw the space-age building that is now Geisel Library, I was enamored with its iconic design, as well as its scholarly and literacy mission,” said Geisel. “Decades later, I am delighted with the impact the Library has had on countless students, researchers, and scholars, as well as on San Diego. It gives me great joy to help ensure that Geisel Library will continue to attract and fuel students, scholars, and community members who are passionate about learning.”

While the UC San Diego Library has long been recognized as a leader in digitizing its collections and in harnessing technology to advance scholarship, the 285,000 square-foot facility—which is more than four decades old—has become dated.  As the Library’s collections continue to shift from print to digital, spaces no longer needed to house books and journals are increasingly needed for collaborative learning and research.

“There is no way to convey how much Audrey’s gift means to the UC San Diego Library,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian.  “I am thrilled with the positively transformative effect this will have on the Geisel Library public spaces, and how much this will benefit the campus and local communities. Audrey’s incredible support through the existing Geisel Library Endowments has ensured a level of excellence in our collections and staff, and helped maintain our ranking as a top 25 research library during a time of significant budget cuts. This current use gift will launch an exciting new chapter in our evolution, ensuring that Geisel Library continues to function as a vital and innovative facility that enables our talented students, faculty, and staff to excel.”

The main (2nd) floor of Geisel Library is the most active learning space in the Library. Based on ongoing assessments of user needs and traffic patterns, this floor will be redesigned to more effectively support the various approaches to study, research, and learning of today’s students and scholars. The major renovation will include a reconfigured lobby entrance; a significant upgrade to the existing Learning Commons; a new Research Commons; a café and lounge; the implementation of new technologies; and significant enhancements to furniture, carpeting and finishes.

“Our library facilities are being used now, more than ever,” said Schottlaender. “But, like many libraries across the nation, the Library is being used in different ways than it has in the past.  Our hope is that this generous gift will lead to more support, so we can upgrade other public spaces in the building in the near future. I would urge others to join Audrey in helping fulfill this exciting initiative to transform Geisel Library into a library that is well-equipped for 21st century learners. We want this amazing building to be as inspiring on the inside as it is bold on the outside.”

Geisel Library is also home to the Dr. Seuss Collection—in Mandeville Special Collections—with more than 12,000 original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs, and other memorabilia documenting the creative achievements of Theodor Seuss Geisel. In 1992, additional space was added to the Geisel Library building with the construction of subterranean wings by Gunnar Birkerts & Associates, preserving the silhouette of the building’s striking geometric design.

Renovation of the entry level of Geisel Library is the first stage of the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative, with additional major enhancements slated for the 1st and 8th floors. Private support is essential to accomplishing this ambitious undertaking. For further information on the initiative, please click here or contact Julie Sully, Director of Development for the Library, at jsully@ucsd.edu or 858-822-4554.

Library Acquires Scientific American Archive

The UC San Diego Library recently acquired the Scientific American Archive and Scientific American Supplement and Builders Edition Archive collections, so we now have the complete run of the magazine going back to 1845. You can browse the issues or search the full text. Note: if you end up with search results from all of the Nature journals, select the Scientific American link to the right of the results list to narrow.

Scientific American magazine covers

UC Libraries Become Hub for Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) DPLA 2brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world online. An online library into the United States’ historical and cultural heritage, DPLA aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more.

The UC Libraries have recently joined the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as a Content Hub. In our role as a DPLA Content Hub, the California Digital Library will be sharing metadata records from Calisphere, a website containing approximately 250,000 digital primary source objects contributed by libraries, archives, and museums across the state of California– including unique content from across the UC Libraries. Because of the increased exposure, the UC Libraries’ digital resources will have a broader, nationwide audience that will be able to find and discover unique collections maintained across the UC Libraries.

Browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, physical location via a map, a virtual bookshelf, and faceted search. You can also save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. Never has our cultural heritage been so easy to explore!

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series: “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” Themes

This year’s Holocaust Living History Workshop Series, a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the University’swomen with Swastikas Judaic Studies Program, will explore the themes of “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” as they represent survivor experiences.

For nearly 70 years, historians, sociologists, literary theorists, and other academics have tried to make sense of the Holocaust, one of the 20th century’s most disturbing and enigmatic calamities. Despite the massive amount of scholarship that has been generated, some stories and experiences remain lost, neglected or forgotten outright. As part of its mission to educate and raise awareness, the Holocaust Living History Workshop focuses on both well-known and less familiar stories and narratives of the Shoah. This fall’s lecture series sheds light on those lost, forgotten, or poorly documented stories and experiences from the past, to promote a richer understanding of the Holocaust’s myriad dimensions.

Interested members of the public and campus community are invited to attend the events and hear local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars share their stories. Participants can also learn about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest database of Holocaust testimony. All sessions, free and open to the public, will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room, from 5 to 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

 

Oct. 22: Getting Here: An Odyssey through WW II /Ruth Hohberg           gulag_460x276

Born in Bielsko, Poland, Ruth Weiss Hohberg fled eastward during WWII. Her parents were forced into a Siberian labor camp and then relocated to Uzbekistan, where Ruth attended school. At war’s end, she returned to her hometown, only to find the population unwilling to accept returning Jews. After an interlude in Sweden, she arrived in the United States. Her long ordeal depicts an experience that is less familiar to scholars of the Holocaust, yet it is in urgent need of exposure. Hohberg is an artist and writer and lives in Rancho Bernardo.

 

Nov. 13: Hitler’s Furies: Ordinary Women? /Wendy Lower

Nazi womenAward-winning historian Wendy Lower delves into the lives and experiences of German women in the Nazi killing fields. Her research chillingly debunks the age-old myth of the German woman as mother and breeder, removed from the tough, male-dominated world of politics and war. The women Lower labels “furies” humiliated their victims, plundered their goods, and often killed them. And, like many of their male counterparts, they got away with murder. Lower is the John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna University and has published widely on the Shoah in Eastern Europe.

To find out more about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman, the program coordinator at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://libraries.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Four Students Win Library Research Prize

Congratulations to the 2014 Undergraduate Library Research Prize Winners!  ULRP2014Jessica Gross, Maarouf Saad, Jessica Knapp, Adam Simon (not shown)

Co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UCSD Alumni Association, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the annual prize includes cash awards of $1000 and $500 for first and second place. Awards are given in two categories, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities, and Physical and Life Sciences, to undergraduate students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and use of The Library’s resources in research undertaken at UCSD. We applaud this year’s winners for their intellectual prowess, and stellar critical thinking and research skills.

In the Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities category, first prize went to Jessica Knapp for her project, “The Effects of Mental Illness on the Javanese Family.” Second prize was awarded to Jessica Gross for her project, “Religious Women as Apothecaries and Practitioners in Early Modern France.”

First prize in the Life and Physical Sciences category went to Maarouf Saad for his project, “Alcohol-Dysregulated MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Cancer.” And, second prize was awarded to Adam Simon for his project, “Synthesis of a Novel 2-Deoxystreptamine Mimetic: Building Blocks for Aminoglycoside Analogs.”

To be considered for the Undergraduate Libraries Research Prize, students must be nominated by faculty members and must participate in either the annual UC San Diego Undergraduate Research Conference held in the spring, or in other university programs that foster and recognize student research and scholarship. The Undergraduate Research Conference is one of three major undergraduate scholarly meetings that the Academic Enrichment Programs coordinate each year that afford students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to present findings of research conducted under the guidance of UC San Diego faculty members.

 

 

Public Beta Launch: UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections Website

We are excited to announce the public beta launch of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website.

The Digital Collections website contains more than 65,000 digital items that include documents, photographs, audio, video, and data sets that are unique to the UC San Diego Library.                          DAMS4

Unique Digital Collections include the Baja California Collection, the Dr. Seuss Collection, the Missions of Alta California, the Spanish Civil War Collection, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology, and UC San Diego History.

The Digital Collections also contain more than 6,000 digital objects of research data gathered by campus researchers as part of UC San Diego’s The Research Cyberinfrastructure Program.

We are in a test phase before replacing our current site: https://libraries.ucsd.edu/digital/ Help us by being a beta tester. We encourage you to use the “Help” menu of the site to report bugs or to submit any suggestions for improvement.

The new Digital Collections website incorporates responsive web design so you can browse the site on all your devices. Browse and discover the unique collections contained in our Digital Collections website at: Browse by Collection.

And, bookmark the UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website at:  http://library.ucsd.edu/dc

 

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