UC Libraries Become Hub for Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) DPLA 2brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world online. An online library into the United States’ historical and cultural heritage, DPLA aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more.

The UC Libraries have recently joined the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as a Content Hub. In our role as a DPLA Content Hub, the California Digital Library will be sharing metadata records from Calisphere, a website containing approximately 250,000 digital primary source objects contributed by libraries, archives, and museums across the state of California– including unique content from across the UC Libraries. Because of the increased exposure, the UC Libraries’ digital resources will have a broader, nationwide audience that will be able to find and discover unique collections maintained across the UC Libraries.

Browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, physical location via a map, a virtual bookshelf, and faceted search. You can also save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. Never has our cultural heritage been so easy to explore!

Sharing Julia Child’s Appetite for Life

Internationally recognized biographer Noel Riley Fitch offers some food for thought in “Sharing Julia Child’s Appetite for Life,” the title of her keynote address at the Library’s recent Dinner in the Library event now available for viewing on UCTV’s The Library Channel.

Fitch gives a revealing look into how Child’s passion for French cuisine made her a culinary icon to generations of Americans. Julia came of age in what Fitch jokingly called “The Golden Age of Food Processing,” when Julia, as a student at Smith College, would ravenously consume jelly-filled donuts, brownies with chocolate sauce, and other “tasty junk food.” At 6’3,” said Fitch, Julia was always hungry but was not all that interested in food per se. It would be many years before Julia became interested in French cuisine, laboring for a decade on her first book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, which launched her as a culinary icon.

Fitch’s book, Appetite for Life: The Biography of Julia Child, was the only biography exclusively authorized by Julia Child; her other subjects include fellow Paris expats Ernest Hemingway, Sylvia Beach and Anais Nin.

http://www.uctv.tv/shows/28563

UCTV Julia Child Fitch

 

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century

“That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century,” a new exhibit on display in UC San Diego’s Geisel Library, features a wide Ballots NewHampshire1884RepPresStCounty-190range of voting ballots or tickets that were used during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The ballots are the property of Samuel Kernell, a professor of Political Science at UC San Diego and co-author (with Erik J. Engstrom) of the new book “Party Ballots, Reform, and the Transformation of America’s Electoral System.” The book explores the fascinating and puzzling world of 19th and early 20th century American elections.

Ballots NewHampshireDem1882ExampleOfPaster-215According to Kernell, up until the late 1820′s, voting by voice was the prevalent practice for electing candidates for public office. A number of factors made it necessary to transition to a paper ballot system of voting, including the profusion of elective offices with too many voters voting for too many offices, both of which made voice voting impractical. The new practice of voters publicly submitting a party ballot, however, ushered in numerous possibilities for party patronage and outright voter fraud. With a single ballot — or ticket, as ballots were referred to then– affecting so many offices, party politicians sought to mobilize as many supporters as possible. And, since the voting was public, they could confirm that a voter voted “correctly,” which enabled party bosses to promise services, jobs, and even direct bribes–$5 gold pieces in the 1880 election–were offered up to persuade supporters to go to the polls. By 1880, some presidential elections were generating a nearly 80 percent turnout. It was not until the last decade of the 19th century, that Australian ballot reform swept the nation. This led to the private voting and state-supplied ballot listing of the various political parties’ candidates for each of the offices, which reflects our current voting process.

That’s the Ticket: Voting in the 19th Century is on display through December 22nd on the main floor of Geisel Library.

New WalkStations @ Geisel

Check out our two new WalkStations by the Learning Commons Desk in Geisel 2nd Floor East.

walkstation

Long hours of sitting can leave you feeling sapped and unfocused. Take a nice walk to boost your metabolism and concentration, and bring your book or laptop!

 

WalStations Feature:

      • Adjustable height tables
      • Super quiet treadmills
      • Speed controls (2 mph max)
      • Safety clips
      • Table top power access (coming soon)

 

 

 

 

 

Let us know what you think. Comment below, or email learningspaces@ucsd.edu

 

 

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series: “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” Themes

This year’s Holocaust Living History Workshop Series, a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the University’swomen with Swastikas Judaic Studies Program, will explore the themes of “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” as they represent survivor experiences.

For nearly 70 years, historians, sociologists, literary theorists, and other academics have tried to make sense of the Holocaust, one of the 20th century’s most disturbing and enigmatic calamities. Despite the massive amount of scholarship that has been generated, some stories and experiences remain lost, neglected or forgotten outright. As part of its mission to educate and raise awareness, the Holocaust Living History Workshop focuses on both well-known and less familiar stories and narratives of the Shoah. This fall’s lecture series sheds light on those lost, forgotten, or poorly documented stories and experiences from the past, to promote a richer understanding of the Holocaust’s myriad dimensions.

Interested members of the public and campus community are invited to attend the events and hear local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars share their stories. Participants can also learn about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest database of Holocaust testimony. All sessions, free and open to the public, will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room, from 5 to 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

 

Oct. 22: Getting Here: An Odyssey through WW II /Ruth Hohberg           gulag_460x276

Born in Bielsko, Poland, Ruth Weiss Hohberg fled eastward during WWII. Her parents were forced into a Siberian labor camp and then relocated to Uzbekistan, where Ruth attended school. At war’s end, she returned to her hometown, only to find the population unwilling to accept returning Jews. After an interlude in Sweden, she arrived in the United States. Her long ordeal depicts an experience that is less familiar to scholars of the Holocaust, yet it is in urgent need of exposure. Hohberg is an artist and writer and lives in Rancho Bernardo.

 

Nov. 13: Hitler’s Furies: Ordinary Women? /Wendy Lower

Nazi womenAward-winning historian Wendy Lower delves into the lives and experiences of German women in the Nazi killing fields. Her research chillingly debunks the age-old myth of the German woman as mother and breeder, removed from the tough, male-dominated world of politics and war. The women Lower labels “furies” humiliated their victims, plundered their goods, and often killed them. And, like many of their male counterparts, they got away with murder. Lower is the John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna University and has published widely on the Shoah in Eastern Europe.

To find out more about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman, the program coordinator at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://libraries.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Four Students Win Library Research Prize

Congratulations to the 2014 Undergraduate Library Research Prize Winners!  ULRP2014Jessica Gross, Maarouf Saad, Jessica Knapp, Adam Simon (not shown)

Co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UCSD Alumni Association, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the annual prize includes cash awards of $1000 and $500 for first and second place. Awards are given in two categories, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities, and Physical and Life Sciences, to undergraduate students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and use of The Library’s resources in research undertaken at UCSD. We applaud this year’s winners for their intellectual prowess, and stellar critical thinking and research skills.

In the Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities category, first prize went to Jessica Knapp for her project, “The Effects of Mental Illness on the Javanese Family.” Second prize was awarded to Jessica Gross for her project, “Religious Women as Apothecaries and Practitioners in Early Modern France.”

First prize in the Life and Physical Sciences category went to Maarouf Saad for his project, “Alcohol-Dysregulated MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Cancer.” And, second prize was awarded to Adam Simon for his project, “Synthesis of a Novel 2-Deoxystreptamine Mimetic: Building Blocks for Aminoglycoside Analogs.”

To be considered for the Undergraduate Libraries Research Prize, students must be nominated by faculty members and must participate in either the annual UC San Diego Undergraduate Research Conference held in the spring, or in other university programs that foster and recognize student research and scholarship. The Undergraduate Research Conference is one of three major undergraduate scholarly meetings that the Academic Enrichment Programs coordinate each year that afford students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to present findings of research conducted under the guidance of UC San Diego faculty members.

 

 

Public Beta Launch: UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections Website

We are excited to announce the public beta launch of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website.

The Digital Collections website contains more than 65,000 digital items that include documents, photographs, audio, video, and data sets that are unique to the UC San Diego Library.                          DAMS4

Unique Digital Collections include the Baja California Collection, the Dr. Seuss Collection, the Missions of Alta California, the Spanish Civil War Collection, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology, and UC San Diego History.

The Digital Collections also contain more than 6,000 digital objects of research data gathered by campus researchers as part of UC San Diego’s The Research Cyberinfrastructure Program.

We are in a test phase before replacing our current site: https://libraries.ucsd.edu/digital/ Help us by being a beta tester. We encourage you to use the “Help” menu of the site to report bugs or to submit any suggestions for improvement.

The new Digital Collections website incorporates responsive web design so you can browse the site on all your devices. Browse and discover the unique collections contained in our Digital Collections website at: Browse by Collection.

And, bookmark the UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website at:  http://library.ucsd.edu/dc

 

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