Missing: The Fate of the Nazi Concentration Camp Archives

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Don’t miss the final Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) of the 2014-2015 academic year on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 in the Seuss Room of the Geisel Library from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

The workshop, The Fate of the Nazi Concentration Camp Archives, will feature J.J. Surbeck, a Swiss-educated attorney who served 16 years with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

The ICRC was founded in 1863 as a private Swiss organization, striving to ensure protection and assistance for victims of armed conflict and help reunite POWs and uprooted civilians with their families. In 1864, it persuaded governments to adopt the first Geneva Convention, the treaty that required armies to care for wounded soldiers, whatever side they were on.

With the Nazi conquest of most of Europe resulting in the displacement of millions of individuals, the British Red Cross and the ICRC began working together to trace victims of incarceration, forced labor, and relocation in 1943. This effort eventually led to the establishment of the

International Tracing Service (ITS), which is now a massive archive in Bad Arolsen, Germany containing 30 million records on the survivors and victims of the Nazi concentration camps.

Surbeck will discuss the inter-workings and history of the ICRC and the role it played in WWII. This event is free and open to the public. No reservation necessary. Refreshments will be served.

For more information about the HLHW, which is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and Judaic Studies Program, please contact Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

‘San Diego Welcomes the World’ Salutes Centenary of Panama–California Exposition of 1915

PanamaExhibit-6v2

San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, which commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal, and launched the City as an international venue. The construction of the Panama Canal was an immense engineering feat, dramatically cutting the distance and cost of international shipping by opening a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It also proved to be an excellent opportunity for enhancing San Diego’s profile–as it would become the first port north of the Panama Canal on the West Coast of the United States.  The event also provided San Diego leaders with the impetus for transforming Balboa Park from an undeveloped, arid property, into a lush and distinctly Spanish paradise. The 1915 Exposition led to both the greening of Balboa Park as well as the creation of the park’s cultural institutions and stunning Spanish Revival architecture.

The exhibition, which is on display on the main floor in Geisel Library (2nd floor, West Wing) until July 5, 2015, includes images of some of the few permanent structures designed for the fair, including the California Tower and dome, the Cabrillo Bridge, and the Spreckels Organ Pavilion. Other items in the exhibit include souvenir books and postcards, newspaper articles, sheet music, a special student admittance pass, maps of the Canal, and more.

Cataloging Librarian Rebecca Culbertson Wins ALCTS Award

Untitled-6Rebecca Culbertson, an Electronic Resources Cataloging Librarian at UC San Diego, has received the 2015 Ulrich’s Serials Librarianship Award from the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Culbertson is being honored for her achievements in serials librarianship, including mentoring a generation of catalogers and serving as “a champion for cataloging education.”

“Becky has truly made enormous contributions to cataloging,” said University Librarian Brian Schottlaender. “Her concept of using one bibliographic record for multiple providers of online serial titles—known as the Provider-Neutral concept—has become the accepted practice for online monographs as well. As a former cataloger myself, I have a great deal of respect for her work and am grateful for her many efforts.”

Culbertson began working for the UC San Diego Library (then the Undergraduate Library) in 1967, under Melvin Voigt, the University’s first University Librarian. She remembers seeing the Geisel Library under construction and the big move to the building after its completion in 1970. Technology, she recalls, was not what it is today: “There was not even a functioning Xerox machine.” Originally from Lansing, Michigan, Culbertson graduated from Kalamazoo College and the University of Michigan School of Library Science. She worked as a cataloger at the University of Michigan for three years, and then did a six-month stint at the University of Georgia, while her husband was in Naval Supply Corps School.

Culbertson will be honored and formally presented with her award—which includes $750 from ProQuest—on June 27 at the ALCTS awards ceremony at the ALA’s 2015 Annual Conference in San Francisco. Maria Collins of North Carolina State University’s Hunt Library is receiving the award along with Culbertson. As a longtime mentor to many budding catalogers over the years, Culbertson’s advice is simple: Learn to make effective use of the catalog. After 50 years, she is still enthusiastic about librarianship and finds the future of library and information work—“the steady drumbeat of the move towards Open Access both through local digitization efforts and repositories”—exciting.

Among her many contributions to the field, she has been an active contributor to CONSER and Program of Cooperative Cataloging (PCC) task groups, and has worked tirelessly to develop and promote clear standards for the cataloging and communication of serials information, as well as the effective presentation of journals though accepted standards.

New Collection Endowments Provide Vital Support for the Library

Collection endowments have been critical in supporting and growing the Library’s collections, ensuring that the Library’s information resources will be maintained and enhanced in perpetuity. Over the years, supporters of the UC San Diego Library have established more than 50 collection endowments that support academic disciplines and intellectual interests. Recently, several collection endowments have been enhanced or newly established—including one from a long established San Diego family, as well as endowments from a UC San Diego faculty member and an alumna.

Robert and Fredricka Driver

Robert and Fredricka Driver

In December 2014, a significant gift was made by the children of Robert and Fredricka Driver to strengthen the Fredricka Driver Endowment Library Fund. This endowment was established in 1986, in conjunction with an NEH matching grant by long-time San Diegan and civic leader, Robert “Bob” Driver, in honor of his wife, Fredricka, best known as Freddie.

“My parents had a deep love of learning and were thrilled when UC San Diego was established in 1960, in a location so close to their Del Mar home,” said Sandy Driver-Gordon. “My mother especially appreciated what an education could bring, as she attended Pomona College at a time when women generally did not pursue higher education.”

The Driver family also demonstrated their generosity to the San Diego community in numerous ways. Bob—founder of one of San Diego’s most prominent independent insurance brokerage firms—was a major supporter of Project Concern (now Project Concern International), a humanitarian, San Diego-based non-profit, and also ran for a number of political offices. Freddie’s many charitable activities included volunteering as head of the San Diego Girl Scouts and Door of Hope, a home for unwed mothers.

“With this recent gift, the Driver endowment is now one of the Library’s largest collection endowments and provides significant support for the humanities materials. We thank the Driver family for their continued commitment to the Library and the University,” said University Librarian Brian Schottlaender. “We are also very grateful to Pamela Newcomb and Clare and Paul Friedman for their support.”

In addition to the Driver family, a new endowment—the Pamela Newcomb Library Collection Endowment—has been established by UC San Diego alumna Pamela Newcomb, in support of humanities collections. Pamela graduated in 1981,

Pamela Newcomb

Pamela Newcomb

with a degree in history and classical studies and felt that the Library supported her studies in a very meaningful way.  “I am enthusiastic to be able to create this endowment in support of the humanities collections,” said Pamela. “The Library was so important to my educational experience at UC San Diego and I feel fortunate that I can now support the excellence of the information resources available to future generations of students, faculty, and the general public.” Pamela’s gift will help nurture a new generation of humanities scholars who can take advantage of cutting-edge research materials in classical studies, history, art, philosophy, literature, music, and other topics that form many cultural heritages.

A second collection endowment was established by long-time Library supporters, Paul and Clare Friedman, whose endowment provides unrestricted support for the Library’s general research collections. Paul Friedman is a professor emeritus at UC San Diego; Clare Friedman is a retired faculty member at USD.

Paul and Clare Friedman

Paul and Clare Friedman

“We are delighted to establish the Paul and Clare Friedman Library Collection Endowment at the UC San Diego Library,” said the Friedmans.  “As emeriti faculty and lifelong readers, it means a great deal to us to support the Library’s collections and their vital role in fueling discovery and learning at UC San Diego and beyond.  We have supported the Library for many years and felt it was the right time to create an endowed fund that will impact the resources available to students and faculty for generations to come.  We encourage others to do the same!”

If you are interested in providing collection endowment support to the UC San Diego Library, please contact Julie Sully, Director of Development, at 858-822-4554 or jsully@ucsd.edu.

UC Libraries Become Hub for Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) DPLA 2brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world online. An online library into the United States’ historical and cultural heritage, DPLA aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more.

The UC Libraries have recently joined the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as a Content Hub. In our role as a DPLA Content Hub, the California Digital Library will be sharing metadata records from Calisphere, a website containing approximately 250,000 digital primary source objects contributed by libraries, archives, and museums across the state of California– including unique content from across the UC Libraries. Because of the increased exposure, the UC Libraries’ digital resources will have a broader, nationwide audience that will be able to find and discover unique collections maintained across the UC Libraries.

Browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, physical location via a map, a virtual bookshelf, and faceted search. You can also save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. Never has our cultural heritage been so easy to explore!

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series

Holocaust Living History Workshop, Fall 2014 Series: “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” Themes

This year’s Holocaust Living History Workshop Series, a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the University’swomen with Swastikas Judaic Studies Program, will explore the themes of “Hidden Stories: Legacy of Pain” as they represent survivor experiences.

For nearly 70 years, historians, sociologists, literary theorists, and other academics have tried to make sense of the Holocaust, one of the 20th century’s most disturbing and enigmatic calamities. Despite the massive amount of scholarship that has been generated, some stories and experiences remain lost, neglected or forgotten outright. As part of its mission to educate and raise awareness, the Holocaust Living History Workshop focuses on both well-known and less familiar stories and narratives of the Shoah. This fall’s lecture series sheds light on those lost, forgotten, or poorly documented stories and experiences from the past, to promote a richer understanding of the Holocaust’s myriad dimensions.

Interested members of the public and campus community are invited to attend the events and hear local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars share their stories. Participants can also learn about the Visual History Archive, the world’s largest database of Holocaust testimony. All sessions, free and open to the public, will be held in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room, from 5 to 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

 

Oct. 22: Getting Here: An Odyssey through WW II /Ruth Hohberg           gulag_460x276

Born in Bielsko, Poland, Ruth Weiss Hohberg fled eastward during WWII. Her parents were forced into a Siberian labor camp and then relocated to Uzbekistan, where Ruth attended school. At war’s end, she returned to her hometown, only to find the population unwilling to accept returning Jews. After an interlude in Sweden, she arrived in the United States. Her long ordeal depicts an experience that is less familiar to scholars of the Holocaust, yet it is in urgent need of exposure. Hohberg is an artist and writer and lives in Rancho Bernardo.

 

Nov. 13: Hitler’s Furies: Ordinary Women? /Wendy Lower

Nazi womenAward-winning historian Wendy Lower delves into the lives and experiences of German women in the Nazi killing fields. Her research chillingly debunks the age-old myth of the German woman as mother and breeder, removed from the tough, male-dominated world of politics and war. The women Lower labels “furies” humiliated their victims, plundered their goods, and often killed them. And, like many of their male counterparts, they got away with murder. Lower is the John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna University and has published widely on the Shoah in Eastern Europe.

To find out more about UC San Diego’s Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman, the program coordinator at hlhw@ucsd.edu or go to: http://libraries.ucsd.edu/hlhw. Training in the use of the Visual History Archive is available for individuals and groups upon appointment.

Four Students Win Library Research Prize

Congratulations to the 2014 Undergraduate Library Research Prize Winners!  ULRP2014Jessica Gross, Maarouf Saad, Jessica Knapp, Adam Simon (not shown)

Co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UCSD Alumni Association, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the annual prize includes cash awards of $1000 and $500 for first and second place. Awards are given in two categories, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities, and Physical and Life Sciences, to undergraduate students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and use of The Library’s resources in research undertaken at UCSD. We applaud this year’s winners for their intellectual prowess, and stellar critical thinking and research skills.

In the Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities category, first prize went to Jessica Knapp for her project, “The Effects of Mental Illness on the Javanese Family.” Second prize was awarded to Jessica Gross for her project, “Religious Women as Apothecaries and Practitioners in Early Modern France.”

First prize in the Life and Physical Sciences category went to Maarouf Saad for his project, “Alcohol-Dysregulated MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Cancer.” And, second prize was awarded to Adam Simon for his project, “Synthesis of a Novel 2-Deoxystreptamine Mimetic: Building Blocks for Aminoglycoside Analogs.”

To be considered for the Undergraduate Libraries Research Prize, students must be nominated by faculty members and must participate in either the annual UC San Diego Undergraduate Research Conference held in the spring, or in other university programs that foster and recognize student research and scholarship. The Undergraduate Research Conference is one of three major undergraduate scholarly meetings that the Academic Enrichment Programs coordinate each year that afford students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to present findings of research conducted under the guidance of UC San Diego faculty members.

 

 

Public Beta Launch: UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections Website

We are excited to announce the public beta launch of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website.

The Digital Collections website contains more than 65,000 digital items that include documents, photographs, audio, video, and data sets that are unique to the UC San Diego Library.                          DAMS4

Unique Digital Collections include the Baja California Collection, the Dr. Seuss Collection, the Missions of Alta California, the Spanish Civil War Collection, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology, and UC San Diego History.

The Digital Collections also contain more than 6,000 digital objects of research data gathered by campus researchers as part of UC San Diego’s The Research Cyberinfrastructure Program.

We are in a test phase before replacing our current site: https://libraries.ucsd.edu/digital/ Help us by being a beta tester. We encourage you to use the “Help” menu of the site to report bugs or to submit any suggestions for improvement.

The new Digital Collections website incorporates responsive web design so you can browse the site on all your devices. Browse and discover the unique collections contained in our Digital Collections website at: Browse by Collection.

And, bookmark the UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website at:  http://library.ucsd.edu/dc

 

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