Holocaust Living History Workshop Hosts Three Events for Winter 2017

The Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLWH) at the University of California San Diego continues its year-long series of educational events with three insightful programs this winter, underscoring this year’s theme, “Holocaust and the Burden of History.” This year’s events approach the Holocaust from various angles to shed light on lesser-known aspects of the atrocities committed, such as the transgenerational transmission of trauma. The series, now in its ninth year of programming, is presented by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program.

HLHW events are designed to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. Members of the public and campus community are invited to attend the events to hear from local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars, as they share their personal stories and memories. All events are free and held on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5 to 7 p.m., except where otherwise noted.

January 18—Out of Oswiecim: A Family’s Odyssey—With William Rosenbaum

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The Enoch Rosenbaum family of Oswiecim

Our first winter quarter event features Del Mar resident William Rosenbaum, who will present the story of Oswiecim/Auschwitz through the prism of his family history, and share some of the challenges of being a second-generation Holocaust survivor. After the outbreak of WWII, William’s father, Jakob Enoch Rosenbaum, and his family were forced to move from Os-wiecim—a small town in Southern Poland that had been home to Jews since the mid-16th century— to the Bedzin ghetto, where they endured a life of grueling forced labor, material hardship, and daily cruelty. Through one of the ironies of history, Jakob eventually ended up in Auschwitz, a few miles from his old home. Read more…

New Partnerships with Chinese & German University Libraries

The University of California San Diego Library has embarked on new international agreements with two academic libraries— Fudan University Library in Shanghai, China and the Göttingen State and University Library in Germany.

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University Librarian Brian Schottlaender with Yan Feng of Fudan University Library.

“Sharing knowledge, expertise, and collections with our library counterparts in Asia and Europe benefits our respective scholarly communities in diverse ways,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “I greatly appreciate the interest and cooperation of my colleagues at Fudan University Library and Göttingen State and University Library in bringing these agreements to fruition. We look forward to the positive and productive collaborations ahead.”

The agreement with Fudan University Library, which was signed on October 8, 2016, builds on existing collaborations between UC San Diego and Fudan University, including a Fudan-University of California center based at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy. The Library’s agreement calls for UC San Diego to send a librarian to the Fudan Library on an annual basis to conduct workshops for library school students on relevant library services and information management topics. It also ensures that visiting scholars, librarians, and library school students will have free access to each library’s information resources.

On November 4, 2016, the UC San Diego Library finalized a three-year agreement with the Göttingen State and University Library, paving the way for regular library staff exchanges that will focus on sharing knowledge and expertise in areas such as research data management, digital archiving, and information technology. The exchange program will begin in winter 2017 and will enable library staff members to visit each other’s library to observe, engage in discussions, and leverage their respective areas of expertise for mutual benefit and growth.

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New 3-D CAVEkiosk at UC San Diego Brings Cyber-Archaeology to Geisel

The University of California San Diego’s iconic, futuristic spaceship of a building, Geisel Library, will unveil its first virtual-reality 3-D display system during a public reception on Monday, November 7 from 10 am to noon. The life-size CAVEkiosk will be open to the campus community and the public at large, but it will also allow researchers to analyze and visualize 3-D data from at-risk archaeological sites in Egypt, Turkey, Jordan, Israel, Greece, Morocco and Cyprus. Ongoing hours of operation can be found here.

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An ancient cultural heritage site in the Egyptian city of Luxor as seen on the CAVEkiosk virtual-reality system.

The Geisel Library kiosk is one of four kiosks planned for University of California campuses at San Diego, Berkeley, Los Angeles, and Merced. All are partners in a UC collaboration led by UC San Diego archaeologist Thomas E. Levy, a professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Qualcomm Institute’s Center for Cyber-Archaeology and Sustainability (CCAS).

The At-Risk Cultural Heritage and Digital Humanities project, funded by a UC President’s Research Catalyst Award, leverages a 10-100 Gigabits-per-second network—the National Science Foundation-funded Pacific Research Platform (PRP)—to harness and preserve “big data” to ensure that endangered cultural heritage resources are preserved and safeguarded.

“We have just completed the first year of our Catalyst grant,” said Levy. “The installation of the 3-D CAVEkiosk in UC San Diego’s Geisel Library marks the completion of a major research goal of the project, so our team is very excited about that. In addition to catalyzing cyber-archaeology work and providing virtual reality-equipped network bandwidth with which UC scholars can collaborate, share, store and visualize at-risk cultural heritage data, members of the campus communities and visitors to the kiosks can “travel” to cultural heritage sites and explore them as if they were there.” Read more…

Gift to Library Honors Legacy of Late Holocaust Survivor, Lou Dunst

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Lou Dunst

Holocaust survivor Lou Dunst could have lived life consumed by anger and resentment after his horrific experiences during World War II.  He had been left for dead in the Ebensee concentration camp in Austria when United States troops broke through the gates with a military tank. Soon after his liberation and recovery, Dunst made a conscious decision to turn the hate, violence and inhumanity that he had witnessed into feelings of peace, compassion and love.

Over the years, with prompting from his wife, Estelle, Dunst began sharing his story with others. By the time of his death in 2015, at the age of 89, the businessman and educator had spoken to thousands—from schoolchildren and community members to dignitaries and judges—sharing his philosophy of love and compassion to ensure that atrocities like the Holocaust never happened again.

In honor of Dunst’s legacy of education and tolerance, Estelle Dunst has made a gift to the University of California San Diego, through the Lou Dunst Trust, in support of the Holocaust Living History Workshop, a joint program hosted by the UC San Diego Library and the campus’ Jewish Studies Program. The gift establishes the Lou Dunst Memorial Endowment, which will provide funding for the annual Lou Dunst Memorial Lecture.  The Dunst Lecture will be held as part of the Holocaust Living History Workshop annual lecture series, in which Dunst had been a frequent participant. The workshop was established to preserve the memory of the victims and survivors of the Holocaust and to engage the community in thoughtful considerations of events surrounding the Holocaust and their continued relevance in the world today. Read more…

Events Calendar

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