New Engineering, Computer Science and Life Sciences Lectures from Morgan & Claypool

The Synthesis Lectures are 50 to 100-page ebooks that synthesize topics of interest to students and researchers in computer science, electrical engineering, biomedical engineering, general engineering, mathematics, communications, human-centered informatics, human languages, and information science.  Colloquium Lectures are in Life Sciences and cover topics of interest to students and researchers in medicine, biology, and bioengineering.

New titles in Morgan & Claypool’s Synthesis Digital Library of Engineering and Computer Science:

New titles in Morgan & Claypool’s Colloquium Digital Library of Life Sciences:

New DMPTool v2 Features Numerous Enhancements

According to Reid Otsuji, a librarian with the UC San Diego Library’s Research Data Curation Program,  UCSD researchers will find a number of enhancements with the latest version of the newly released Data Management Planning Tool (DMPTool), including:

Data management plans that were created in the previous version of the DMPTool, said Otsuji, have been migrated to the new DMPTool v2.  All UCSD users can continue to work on current data management plans, edit a previously created plan, or start a new one in the latest release of the DMPTool.

Bookmark and start using the new DMPTool to create or edit your data management plan: http://dmptool.org

For more information on the University of California’s DMPTool: http://dmp.cdlib.org

UCSD researchers who need assistance in using the DMPTool can contact the Library’s Research Data Curation Program at: Research-Data-Curation@ucsd.edu

New Data Management Tool Available

The University of California and several partners have released an enhanced and much anticipated version of the Data Management Planning Tool (DMPTool), a free tool that helps researchers and their institutions create effective data DMPTool logomanagement plans required by the federal government.

“The DMPTool, whose development was led by the UC Curation Center (UC3) in Oakland, is a critical service to UC faculty and an essential component in the suite of data management tools provided to researchers by the UC San Diego Library, ” according to David Minor, Director of the Library’s Research Data Curation Program.

The DMPTool aids researchers with a critical component of research practice required by agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Under the 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy directive, this requirement will expand to nearly all federal agencies within the next year.“This innovative technology was created by a talented group of colleagues working together,” said Patricia Cruse, Director of the UC Curation Center (UC3). “This highlights the importance of collaboration in the success of complex projects such as this.”Read the UC press release in its entirety.

RDCPlogo UCSDTo learn more about using the DMPTool and the data management, curation and sharing services available to UCSD faculty and researchers,  visit UCSD’s Research Data Curation Program (RDCP) website or email the RCDP for assistance in getting started with data management.

UCSD Research Data Curation Web site

UCSD Research Data Curation Email

Four Students Win Library Research Prize

Congratulations to the 2014 Undergraduate Library Research Prize Winners!  ULRP2014Jessica Gross, Maarouf Saad, Jessica Knapp, Adam Simon (not shown)

Co-sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UCSD Alumni Association, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the annual prize includes cash awards of $1000 and $500 for first and second place. Awards are given in two categories, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities, and Physical and Life Sciences, to undergraduate students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and use of The Library’s resources in research undertaken at UCSD. We applaud this year’s winners for their intellectual prowess, and stellar critical thinking and research skills.

In the Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities category, first prize went to Jessica Knapp for her project, “The Effects of Mental Illness on the Javanese Family.” Second prize was awarded to Jessica Gross for her project, “Religious Women as Apothecaries and Practitioners in Early Modern France.”

First prize in the Life and Physical Sciences category went to Maarouf Saad for his project, “Alcohol-Dysregulated MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Cancer.” And, second prize was awarded to Adam Simon for his project, “Synthesis of a Novel 2-Deoxystreptamine Mimetic: Building Blocks for Aminoglycoside Analogs.”

To be considered for the Undergraduate Libraries Research Prize, students must be nominated by faculty members and must participate in either the annual UC San Diego Undergraduate Research Conference held in the spring, or in other university programs that foster and recognize student research and scholarship. The Undergraduate Research Conference is one of three major undergraduate scholarly meetings that the Academic Enrichment Programs coordinate each year that afford students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to present findings of research conducted under the guidance of UC San Diego faculty members.

 

 

Natural Standard Database Access Restored

Access to the Natural Standard database on integrative medicine was not available for UCSD users in April and much of May due to licensing and renewal problems. CDL/UCSF licensing efforts have concluded and we now have access again. Thank you for your patience. The new site is https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

Additional resources for natural product medicine include the following:

My Ideal Library

What would you like your ideal library to be, do, or offer?  Here’s your chance to let us know!   

MyIdealLibraryVisit the Geisel East Learning Commons service desk (2nd Floor) before Wednesday, June 11 (during staffed desk hours), and have your photo taken with your comments.

We’ll post everyone’s ideas in the Commons and online, and you’ll walk away with a FREE bluebook and new pen just in time for finals. We want to hear your thoughts, and see your smile!

Library Student Advisory Council Accepting Applications

Do you have ideas on how to improve the UC San Diego Library? Let your voice be heard. We’re accepting applications for theGeisel_lsac_w Library Student Advisory Council for 2014-2015 through May 30th.

The Library Student Advisory Council (LSAC) is a forum for ongoing dialogue between students and Library staff with the goal of providing the diverse UC San Diego student community with the best possible library services, spaces, and collections to meet their academic needs.  We want to hear from you!

For more information and to apply, visit: http://libraries.ucsd.edu/about/lsac.html

Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered

ruthRuth Klüger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis’ “model ghetto.” Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Klüger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir Still Alive, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Klüger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write. At this event, she will be introduced by history professor Frank Biess.

Sponsored by Phyllis and Dan Epstein Co-sponsored by International House at UCSD

When: Wednesday May 14, 2014, 5 pmstill alive

Where: Great Hall at International House, UC San Diego

Who: free and open to the public – refreshments served 

UCSD & the Local Ecosystem: Insights from Wireless & Biotech

UC San Diego and the Local Ecosystem: Insights from Wireless and Biotech
UC San Diego Library Seuss Room
Thursday, May 15, 2014
3:30 – 5:00PM

UC San Diego has played a central role in the development of the San Diego high-technology economy in both the wireless and biotechnology industries. Dean Mary Walshok (UCSD) and Professor Steven Casper (Keck Graduate Institute) will present results from their chapters on UC San Diego in the forthcoming Stanford University Press book Public Universities and Regional Development: Insights from the University of California edited by Martin Kenney (UC Davis) and David Mowery (UC Berkeley).

SDTA_may_15_event

Asian Pacific American Edit-a-Thon

wikipedia-apa1

Events:

Open Lab: Thursday, May 8th, Geisel Library, Room 276, noon – 1pm

APA Edit-a-thon: Saturday, May 10th, Geisel Library, Room 276, 10am – noon; or participate virtually!

Refreshments will be served! Open to the public!
May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Get ready for the Wikipedia Asian Pacific American (APA) edit-a-thon! The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is organizing an editing event for enriching the presence of cultural, historic, and artistic information on Wikipedia about APA experiences. Wikipedia is one of the most widely-used resources in the world for general information. Whether you’re a seasoned Wikipedian, an APA studies scholar, or completely new to all of this, your help is needed!

The first Wikipedia edit-a-thon dedicated to APA content, this project will occur as physical events on May 10, 2014 in New York City and Washington DC, as well as by proxy ­ with participants taking part from all throughout the world. The UC San Diego Library is hosting a local space in the Geisel Library building, Room 276, from 10am to noon.

The UC San Diego Library is also hosting an Wikipedia open lab session on Thursday, May 8, noon – 1pm, Geisel Library Classroom 2 (276). We can help you set up your accounts and review the editing process, so you’ll be ready to participate, in-person or virtually, for the main event on Saturday, May 10th.

Articles to work on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/Wikipedia_APA

Wikipedia Resources:

We strongly recommend signing up for a Wikipedia account before the edit-a-thon!

Wikipedia Cheat Sheet

Wikipedia Tea House ( a friendly place for new editors to ask questions)

 

Asian American Resources:

UCSD Library Online Resources (restricted to UCSD Network):

Asian American Drama– Asian American Drama contains 186 plays by 35 playwrights, together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies, and more.

Japanese-American Relocation Camp Newspapers
This collection, consisting of 25 individual titles, documents life in World War II internment camps.

Online Resources:

South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA)
an independent national non-profit organization working to create a more inclusive society by giving voice to South Asian Americans through documenting, preserving, and sharing stories that represent their unique and diverse experiences.

FOREASt
(Free Open Resources for East Asian Studies)– relevant scholarly resources published on the Internet by individual scholars, academic institutions, cultural institutions (libraries, museums, archives), government agencies, and occasionally commercial entities. Currently FOREASt provides access to over 300 free databases and journals on East Asia “published” in North America, Europe, Australia and, of course, East Asia.

Asian Voices
Documents relating the Asian American experience from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s.

Camp Harmony Exhibit
Large numbers of the Japanese American community were sent to American internment camps after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. This exhibit tells the story of Seattle’s Japanese American community and one of those camps.

Columbia River Basin Ethnic History Archive: Chinese Americans
Primary documents that tell the story of ethnic groups along the Columbia River Basin (encompassing areas of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and and British Columbia).

Columbia River Basin Ethnic History Archive: Japanese Americans
Primary documents that tell the story of ethnic groups along the Columbia River Basin (encompassing areas of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and and British Columbia).

DENSHO: The Japanese American Legacy Project
Site documents and archives oral histories and photos from Japanese Americans who were incarcerated during World War II. Nonprofit organization has a mission to educate, preserve, collaborate and inspire action for equity.

Japanese American National Museum
The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by preserving, interpreting and sharing the experiences of Japanese Americans.

Japanese American Relocation Digital Archive
Documents the experience of Japanese Americans in WWII internment camps. Primary source materials include photographs, documents, manuscripts, paintings, drawings, letters, and oral histories.

Korean American Digital Archive
The KADA brings together documents, photographs and sound files that document the Korean American community during the period of resistance to Japanese rule in Korea and reveal the organizational and private experience of Koreans in America between 1903 and 1965.

Southeast Asian Archive
The Archive collects materials relating to the resettlement of Southeast Asian refugees and immigrants in the U.S., and the culture and history of Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. There is a special focus on Southeast Asians in Orange County and California.

The Chinese in California, 1850-1925
This site “illustrates nineteenth and early twentieth century Chinese immigration to California through about 8,000 images and pages of primary source materials…These documents describe the experiences of Chinese immigrants in California, including the nature of inter-ethnic tensions. They also document the specific contributions of Chinese immigrants to commerce and business, architecture and art, agriculture and other industries, and cultural and social life in California.”

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