Monsters in Our Midst

monster talk graphic

Faculty Lecture:
Monsters in Our Midst: Being Human, True Blood and the New Outsider
Professor Lisa Lampert-Weissig
Wednesday, October 23, 2-3pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library
Refreshments will be served.

What if our familiar world were actually inhabited by supernatural beings, who lived and loved amongst us without our even being aware of their difference?

In a lively talk, Professor Lisa Lampert-Weissig shares some of her current work on depictions of vampires, werewolves, and other supernatural beings in popular culture. Focusing on the notion of the everyday uncanny, she discusses the way characters in Being Human and True Blood are depicted as hidden minorities, whose complex lives raise important questions about what it means to be human and who is entitled to claim a place as home.

 

monster banner for blog

Exhibit:
Monsters in Our Midst:  Witches, Werewolves, Vampires, & Zombies @ Geisel
Geisel Library, main floor, west wing
Fall 2013

There have always been monsters among us. Terrifying, tantalizing, and ever adaptable, these creatures mirror our deepest fears and most secret desires. Our monsters reveal us to ourselves, showing what it means to be human at a particular time, in a particular place.

Monster derives from the Latin word monstrum, which in turn derives from the root monere (to warn).  To be a monster is to be an omen.  Sometimes the monster is a display of God’s wrath, a portent of the future, a symbol of moral virtue or vice, or an accident of nature.  The monster is more than an odious creature of the imagination; it is a kind of cultural category, employed in domains as diverse as religion, biology, literature and politics.  Hand in hand with this idea that metaphors shape our thinking, communicating, and even feeling is the idea that imagination is more active in our picture of reality that we previously acknowledged. The monster, of course, is a product of and regular inhabitant of the imagination, but the imagination is a driving force behind our entire perception of the world.  If we find monsters in our world, it is sometimes because they are really there and sometimes because we have brought them with us.” (Stephen T. Asma, On Monsters: An Unnatural History of our Worst Fears)

The time is now; the place is Geisel Library:  come explore the changing aspects of the monsters in our midst.

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Amos Oz: Life & Letters

amos oz banner

Amos Oz, one of Israel’s most distinguished novelists and public intellectuals.  Oz, 73, is the author of 18 books and more than 400 articles and essays in Hebrew, with translations of his work into some 40 languages, including Arabic. The recipient of numerous awards for his literature and for his peace activism, Oz is also a professor of literature at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Be’er Sheva. His autobiographical novel “A Tale of Love and Darkness” is an international bestseller and has been honored with 10 different prizes around the world. A film based on the novel is expected to begin production later this year. Most recently, he co-authored “Jews and Words” with his daughter Fania Oz-Salzberger, in which they argue that what unites the Jewish people, more than blood or belief, are sacred and secular texts.

“The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a clash of right and right,” Oz recently told the New York Times. “Tragedies are resolved in one of two ways: The Shakespearian way or the Anton Chekhov way. In a tragedy by Shakespeare, the stage at the end is littered with dead bodies. In a tragedy by Chekhov everyone is unhappy, bitter, disillusioned and melancholy but they are alive. My colleagues in the peace movement and I are working for a Chekhovian not a Shakespearian conclusion.”

Among his many awards and honors, Oz has received the Legion of Honour of France, the Goethe Prize, the French Prix Femina, the Frankfurt Peace Prize, the National Jewish Book Award, the Primo Levi prize, the Prince of Asturias Award in Literature, the Heinrich Heine Prize, and the Israel Prize.

The UC San Diego Library to excited to present an exhibit, “Amos Oz: Life and Letters,” from April 17 through June 10.  The exhibit, in the west wing of Geisel Library’s main floor, will take Oz’s “A Tale of Love and Darkness” as a springing-off point to consider the author’s life and writings, Israeli literature, and Israeli/Palestinian history and politics. Specific exhibit areas include: Oz’s early life and family history; his literary influences and the writers he has influenced; and the development of modern Hebrew as a literary language.

The Library also created a guide to help locate his books in our collections, along with suggesting resources for those interested in more in-depth research: http://libguides.ucsd.edu/amosoz

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Cesar Chavez 2012

Los Peregrinos: A photography exhibit

Photographer Ricardo Garcia-Trejo describes his exhibit:

On March 31st, 1994, approximately 85 United Farm Workers and their supporters gathered together at a site known as “Forty Acres,” just two miles west of Delano, CA. They christened themselves “Peregrinos” and donned wooden crosses with black ribbons around their necks. Then they began an arduous 330 mile pilgrimage over a twenty four day period, recreating the historic 1966 UFW march from Delano to Sacramento inaugurated by their recently deceased leader Cesar Chavez.

April 2 – 30
Geisel Library, 1st Floor, West Wing,  Collaborative Study Space (map)

For a recommended list of films related to Cesar Chavez, see libraries.ucsd.edu/locations/sshl/_files/pdf/chavez film list.pdf.

For more 2012 César E. Chávez events: http://blink.ucsd.edu/go/chavez
Additional photographs on display at the Cross-cultural Center Art Gallery (2nd Floor, Price Center East)

Sponsors: UCSD Chicano/Latino Staff Association, César E. Chávez Planning Committee, and the Librarians’ Association of UCSD Committee on Diversity

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Stitching Memories

 

 

 

 

Film Screening Event:
Faith Ringgold: The Last Story Quilt
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
12 – 1 pm, Seuss Room, Geisel Library
Refreshments will be served.

This film tells the inspiring story of contemporary African-American artist Faith Ringgold. Now world-renowned, particularly for her story quilts which focus on African American themes, Ringgold tells how she chose her particular medium, and recounts how she first became an artist and the adversities which she overcame to pursue her career.

Exhibit:
On display February 1 – March 31, 2012
Geisel Library, 2nd Floor, Social Sciences & Humanities Reference Area (west wing)
Open to all.

For generations African American women have expressed their lives and artistry through quilting.  Even before emancipation, quilts provided much more than warmth:

Denied the opportunity to read or write, slave women quilted their diaries,
creating permanent but unwritten records of events large and small,
of pains and loss, of triumph and tragedy in their lives.
—Gladys-Marie Fry, Stitched from the Soul

Today quilts continue to be a vital expression of African American life:

Quiltmaking is, for certain African American communities, more than just one of the most
popular art forms today. It is a connection with their history and an affirmation of creative
identity; a way to record history and a means to forge the future.
—Ena G. Heller, Threads of Faith

This exhibit moves from the past to the present, exploring the creation and significance of quilts for generations of Americans. Quilts and the idea of quilting have also threaded their way as metaphors through poetry and literature and even into the political arena. And today, many children’s books have been inspired by quilts and quilting.

We are particularly proud to showcase quilts created by local African American quilters from the San Diego People of Color Quilt Guild. Like women before them, these quilters have created vibrant beautiful quilts from new, re-used, reclaimed, and found materials. Their remarkable work encompasses both traditional and contemporary styles.

Visit the exhibit in the Geisel Library building to view quilts, learn about quilting techniques, historically significant quilts and quilters, controversies surrounding so-called quilt codes, and more.

Quilt Show, Reception, & Panel Discussion
February 15, 2012
Seuss Room, Geisel Library building
11:oo am Reception
12:oo pm Panel Discussion
Open to all. Refreshments will be served.

Like women before them, these quilters have created vibrant, beautiful quilts from new, re-used, reclaimed, and found materials. Their remarkable work encompasses both traditional and contemporary styles. Through their work and a panel discussion, they, too, have a story to tell.   Join us for a Quilt Show, Welcome Reception and Panel Discussion by members of the San Diego People of Color Quilt Guild. The stunning works of the quilters from the San Diego People of Color Quilt Guild challenge the commonly held misconception that African American Quilts comprise only strip quilts, patchworks, or rustic creations that reflect what many scholars claim to be an African aesthetic.   African American quilts and quilting traditions defy simple categorization. The additional quilts that will be displayed at the Quilt Show include examples of “Quilted Photography,” a technique pioneered by African American quilter, Tammie Bowser,that turns fabric into intricate pictures, as well as dazzling art quilts, traditional quilts, and much-loved family treasures. All of these quilts document our lived experience, patching together tradition and innovation in a vibrant and vital art form.  Guild members will also be present to answer questions about the Guild and visitors will have the chance to purchase raffle tickets to win the Opportunity Quilt 2012.  The panelists will discuss quilts they have made, and the variety of techniques they have used.

Panelists:

D’Andrea Mitchell, Local Expert in Quilted Photography
Constance Robinson, Quilting Instructor
Sheila Williams, President, San Diego People of Color Quilt Guild

Professor Boatema Boateng, from the UCSD Communication Department, will moderate.

The Panel Discussion is generously sponsored by:
LAUC-SD Committee on Diversity
The UCSD Department of Communication
UCSD African & African American Research Center
The San Diego People of Color Quilt Guild

Paradise Plundered event recording now available online!

The Paradise Plundered event on November 3rd with Professor Steven Erie and Vladimir Kogan was recorded by UCSD-TV. The online streaming and TV schedule for this program is available at http://www.ucsd.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=22932.

This program and other videos are available online on UCSD-TV’s web site www.ucsd.tv.

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International Education Week 2011

International Education Week 2011

Visit the UC San Diego Libraries’ International Education Week display in the Geisel Library building. International Education Week is from November 14 through the 18th. In addition to interesting facts and statistics, UC San Diego students and visiting international students share their study abroad experiences. The display also highlights materials (both print and online) that can help you explore international education opportunities and learn about other countries and cultures– http://libguides.ucsd.edu/iew

International Education Week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. The week is dedicated to enhancing international awareness across the UC San Diego campus as well as to reinforcing the importance of the exchange of students and scholars across borders. For more events on campus—  http://iew.ucsd.edu/iew/calendar.html

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Unburying Treasure

Unburying Treasure: Pyrates at Geisel

Simply put, pirates are thieves; yet they played an important role in history and have captivated our imaginations as they appear in popular culture throughout the ages. The Social Sciences & Humanities Library is pleased to present a new exhibit on piracy. Using books, images and artifacts from our collections, “Unburying Treasure: Pyrates at Geisel” reveals stories of real pirates who sailed the seas during the age of maritime trade. Located in the Social Sciences & Humanities Library (in the Geisel Library building) on the Main Floor through the end of December, be sure to swing by to:

  • learn about famous pirates, modern day piracy, and pirates in popular culture, including books, film, and songs
  • uncover the myths behind the pirate caricature
  • check out the Rogue Gallery to see if you can sort legends from real pirates
  • discover how pirates were involved with map making
  • take your picture with a pirate!

In conjuction with our exhibit, Professor Mark Hanna from the UCSD History Department, will be giving a lecture on Thursday, October 20th, from 1:00 – 2:00 pm in the Seuss Room (in the Geisel Library building) on Nest of Pirates: Piracy and the Formalization of the First British Empire.  Professor Hanna will teach The Golden Age of Piracy in Winter 2012.

At noon on October 20th, Scott Paulson from the Arts Library, will play pirate tunes on the Geisel Library building carillon!

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Better Policies, Better Lives: OECD's 50th Anniversary Exhibit

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has been measuring progress around the globe for over 50 years.  The OECD is a non-governmental organization based in Paris with a mission to promote “polices that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world.” In collaboration with the OECD, the Social Sciences & Humanities Library has launched an exhibit celebrating the organization’s 50th anniversary. The exhibit includes some of their award winning publications that can be used for research and study, as well as information on upcoming events and opportunities such as going on an all paid expense trip to Paris to attend and International Forum!

OECD has been one of the world’s most reliable sources of comparable statistics and economic and social data.  A guide to OECD resources at the UC San Diego Libraries– http://ucsd.libguides.com/oecd

To celebrate their 50th Anniversary, the OECD Washington Office chose 11 Student Ambassadors from across the United States.   UC San Diego student Lauren Klibingat is in the inaugural class. She created and organized the events, exhibit and outreach efforts.

Exhibit
February 1-28, main floor, Social Sciences & Humanities Library

Events
Investing In New Countries: South Africa and Africa after the World Cup
Thursday, February 17, 2011, 4:30 pm, Price Center East Ballroom
OECD Speaker, Andreas Woergoetter, will present and discuss the OECD Economic Survey of South Africa. Topics will include South Africa’s macroeconomic framework, the labor utilization gap, global crisis, and economic development before and after the world cup 2010.
Co-hosted with the Undergraduate Economics Society and Undergraduate Accounting Society

OECD 50th Anniversary Humor Session: A Spirited Look at Climate Change and Green Growth
Thursday, March 31, 2011, 5:30 pm, Price Center East Ballroom
Stand-up economist and Professor at the University of Washington, Yoram Bauman, will be coming to UCSD to present a monologue on the OECD’s 50th anniversary and on the topics of climate change and green growth. Dr. Famulari, Chair of the Economics Department at UCSD, will be introducing Bauman.
Co-hosted with the Undergraduate Economics Society and Undergraduate Accounting Society


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A History of Scholarly Achievement: African American Recipients of Doctoral Degrees

A History of Scholarly Achievement:  African American Recipients of Doctoral Degrees

Edward A. Bouchet

Dr. Edward A. Bouchet, Ph.D.

The first institution in the country to award the doctoral degree, Yale University is Dr. Edward A. Bouchet’s alma mater.  Dr. Bouchet is the first self-identified African American ever to receive the PhD in any discipline and the sixth person in the Western Hemisphere awarded the PhD in Physics.

Exhibit:
February 1 – 28, main floor, Social Sciences & Humanities Library reference area

Reception:
February 24th, 4:00 – 5:30 pm, Seuss Room, Geisel Library building

Please join Dr. Kim E. Barrett, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate Studies, in welcoming distinguished guests Dr. Orlando Taylor, Ph.D., President/Interim VP for Academic Affairs at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology and Dr. Curtis L. Patton, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Epidemiology at Yale University

No RSVP needed.  Refreshments will be served!
Reception sponsored by the Bouchet Graduate Honor Society, the Graduate Student Association, and the Office of Graduate Studies.

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International Education Week 2010

Visit the UC San Diego Libraries’ International Education Week display in the Geisel Library building. International Education Week is from November 15 through the 19th. In addition to interesting facts and statistics, UC San Diego students and visiting international students share their study abroad experiences. The display also highlights materials (both print and online) that can help you explore international education opportunities and learn about other countries and cultures– http://libguides.ucsd.edu/iew

Also, in honor of UC San Diego’s 50th Anniversary, the display includes historical images and news about the International Center and study abroad programs.

Ground breaking at the International Center, 1969

Ground breaking at the International Center, 1969

International Education Week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. The week is dedicated to enhancing international awareness across the UC San Diego campus as well as to reinforcing the importance of the exchange of students and scholars across borders. For more events on campus— http://iew.ucsd.edu/calendar.html

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