Consolidation Updates - Archive

Please contact us if you have questions about the Geisel Library Collections Consolidation.

Fall 2014

Over the last year, the Library has continued to work on integrating the print materials in the Geisel Library Building. This work began in the summer of 2011, when the Library embarked on a multi-year effort to accommodate our smaller campus footprint and to consolidate our print collections from the former Arts, IR/PS, Science & Engineering, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Social Sciences & Humanities libraries. Most recently, a great deal of this work has involved the removal of duplicate runs of journals from the formerly separate collections, and determining the shelf space that will be needed to accommodate ongoing growth of the print collections.

Our chief goal in this effort has been to retain in the Geisel and Biomedical Library buildings the materials that are most actively used and needed to support current instruction and research. The Geisel Library building now holds a total of more than 22,600 print journal titles and 355,500 print journal (de-duplicated) volumes.

Transfer of Low Use Journals to Miramar Road Storage Annex

This coming year, our efforts will focus on freeing up space for future growth in the Geisel building. In order to accomplish this, we are planning to move pre-1990 bound print journal volumes in the humanities and social sciences to the Miramar Road Storage Annex. In 2012, you may recall, we moved pre-1990 print journal volumes in the sciences to the Annex. We estimate that this effort will allow us to maintain the book collections currently housed in Geisel and provide us with 4-5 years of space for future growth of monograph collections in most subject areas.

The pre-1990 journal volumes were selected for this move after we analyzed usage statistics of the print journals. This analysis confirmed that older print journal volumes are the Library’s largest category of low-use materials.

To ensure that faculty members and other users have quick access to these materials, we have developed a service model to make available materials stored offsite within one business day of being requested.

Electronic Journal Backfile Purchases

While our analysis of usage statistics indicates low use of pre-1990 print journals, by contrast, usage of online journals is both substantial and growing. Therefore, over the last few years, we have made it a priority to increase the number of digital journal backfiles available. Some of the backfiles now available online include those from: Cambridge University Press (more than 250 titles, 1770-present); DeGruyter (36 titles, 1877-present); National Geographic (1881-present); Sage (79 titles); and Wiley (select title backfiles, 1841-2004). In addition, we’ve loaded the Vogue Archive from 1892 to the present), and our JSTOR holdings provide extensive online access to more than 2,000 journals in the humanities, social sciences, and life and physical sciences. These JSTOR collections include complete archives of these journals, beginning at the first volume and issue of the journal and extending up to a publication date usually set in the past three to five years.

This fall, we plan to begin the move of the pre-1990 volumes—approximately 12,000 print journal titles in the general humanities and social sciences—to the Miramar Road Storage Annex. We expect to have this transfer of materials completed by summer 2015. Once at the Annex, these volumes may be requested online and will be made available within one business day. Additionally, this fall, we will be installing a digital scanner at our Miramar Road location in order to send scans of articles to our users directly, via email.

Spring 2013

As we near the end of the 2012-13 academic year, the Library is embarking on its third year of significant efforts to consolidate our physical collections. During this time, we have continued to communicate our consolidation proposals through the Library website and, as a result, have received numerous faculty comments and suggestions. This feedback has been instrumental in helping us to determine where best to locate materials and how best to organize collections to support faculty and student research and teaching. In response to feedback this year, we have integrated the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean materials formerly in the International Relations and Pacific Studies Library with our East Asian language collection and we have decided to keep the materials currently in the Science and Engineering Library in the Geisel building.

Your continued feedback will also help us to meet long-term goals for library user space, including the addition of new and enhanced study and computing spaces. While consolidating our physical materials has been necessary to accommodate our smaller footprint on campus, an additional major objective of these efforts has been to meet the needs of students and other library users for more dynamic and flexible study, community, and well-equipped spaces. We have taken significant steps toward this goal with the introduction of a 24/5 study commons in Geisel Library last year and the addition of new high-tech study spaces—both individual and group—in Geisel. In addition, 126 workstations were added in fall quarter, and we have added more than 260 new study seats.

Installation of Compact Shelving in Geisel

The Library is nearing completion on the installation of compact shelving on the first floor of the East Wing of the Geisel Library (the space which has been known as the Science & Engineering Library). In a move which began this spring and will continue through the summer, the Library plans to consolidate into this shelving a continuous run of the current bound journal volumes from the Geisel and SIO collections. The journals currently housed in the Biomedical and Arts Libraries will remain there at present. Phase one of the compact shelving will continue to house monographs in the Q-Z call number ranges, including the Scripps materials. As we’ve communicated previously, we will be proposing that journal volumes older than 1990 continue to be stored and shelved in the offsite Library Annex, where they can be paged and/or articles from them can be scanned as requested. Since some faculty expressed concern about access to those pre-1990 volumes that have a high usage rate, we are planning to keep on site-- on an exceptional basis--those pre-1990 titles that demonstrate a high rate of usage. We have also been actively acquiring more digital backfiles for many of our journals in all disciplines. By the end of the summer, we will be sharing a list of these substantial acquisitions.

We believe that these strategies will provide Library users with better access to journals that were formerly dispersed in various locations within Geisel and across the campus at IR/PS and Scripps Libraries. We are hopeful that this next phase of our collections consolidation and expanded digital access projects will improve collection services to our patrons. While some physical journal volumes may not be immediately available when they are in the process of being moved, we hope the expanded digital access and accurate catalog indicating the status of materials being moved, will provide you with effective access to anything you need.

Transfer of Scripps Materials to Geisel Library

In July 2012, following the closure of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Library, we initiated efforts to consolidate the Scripps print collections into the Geisel Library. That major endeavor, which has involved the moving of approximately 150,000 books as of April, 2013, is expected to be completed by Fall of 2013. Until that effort is completed, Scripps materials can continue to be paged from Geisel Library and delivered to the Scripps campus. As communicated previously, the Scripps Archives and Library Annex, located on the 3rd floor of the Eckart building on the Scripps campus, will continue to provide access to Scripps special collections and archives during the week, by appointment. To make arrangements, please direct queries and questions to the Special Collections and Archives Program, (858) 534-2533.

Winter 2013

Installation of the second phase of compact shelving on the First Floor of the East Wing of Geisel (the lower level of what is currently the Science & Engineering Library) is nearing completion.  In a move to begin this spring and continue through the summer, the Library plans to consolidate into this shelving a continuous run of all bound journal volumes (from 1990 to date) in the Library collection, with the exception of journals currently housed in the BioMed and Arts libraries.

We propose storing journal volumes older than 1990 in the offsite Library Annex. Volumes stored and shelved in the Annex will be paged and/or articles from them scanned as requested.  We are also prepared to keep on site those titles whose pre-1990 volumes are heavily used, on an exceptional basis.

We believe that this plan will provide better access to journals that were formerly dispersed in various locations within Geisel and across the campus at IR/PS and Scripps and will help to meet long-term goals for library user space. Phase one of the compact shelving will continue to house monographs in the Q-Z call number ranges, including the Scripps materials when these are transferred to Geisel.

We are hopeful that this next phase of our collections consolidation project will cause minimal disruptions to our patrons.  While some journal volumes may not be immediately available when they are in the process of being moved, we will keep catalog records updated with notes to indicate the status of materials being moved.

Fall 2012

Last fall, the Library embarked on a 3-year effort to consolidate print collections in order to accommodate our smaller campus footprint. After a great deal of work this summer, we have now completed the first phase of our compact shelving installation on the first floor of the East Wing of Geisel Library; we expect to complete the second phase of that installation during Winter quarter. As we’ve communicated previously, the installation of compact shelving in Geisel Library allows us to maximize the number of volumes that can be accommodated in Geisel, so is absolutely essential.

This first phase of shelving now accommodates the majority of the Q-Z call numbers in one combined sequence. Books and journals are shelved separately to allow ease of access within this new shelving area. On the upper floors of the Geisel tower, meanwhile, materials from the collection that had been located at IR/PS are being merged from their present location on the 8th floor into the A-P call number sequence on floors 5-7 and into the Q-Z sequence in the new first floor compact shelving. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language materials from the collection formerly located at IR/PS will be combined with other similar language materials on the 4th floor of Geisel in order to form a comprehensive East Asia Collection. These decisions were informed by feedback we received from the faculty at the end of the spring quarter last year.

We have also received  many requests for the  return of the oversize materials, formerly located on the 8th floor, from the Annex back to Geisel. These materials had been temporarily moved to offsite storage last year in order to accommodate on the 8th floor materials from IR/PS. As soon as the 8th floor is ready, we plan toinstall dedicated oversize shelving on a portion of the 8th floor and bring back the oversize titles that users have been requesting. We hope to have this finished in spring 2013.

Along with these efforts, we are continuing to reduce duplication in our print collections. As we review and consolidate our science journal collections, we are, in many cases, moving print journals offsite in instances where digital versions are widely available. While print copies will continue to be available from offsite storage, either at our Library Annex or in one of the UC Regional Library Facilities, our goal remains to provide our primary user community with access to what they need, when and where they need it, and in the form most useful to them. Increasingly, our users expect content to be available anytime and anywhere in a digital and mobile form. We are therefore making concerted efforts to obtain scholarly journal electronic backfile content as well as current ebooks when our patrons need them.

Summer 2012

Over the last few months, we have been actively soliciting feedback from faculty and students to ensure that the decisions we make about locating and integrating our collections are fully informed by academic needs and preferences. We have received a great deal of feedback and very much appreciate the comments many of you have shared. As result, we have made some decisions that we wanted to share.

  • East Asia Collection. We have received substantial feedback about whether or not we should integrate our East Asia Collection with others in Geisel.  The opinions shared by many faculty reflect that there is a strong preference for the collection to remain intact. Consequently, the East Asia Collection will remain on the 4th floor of Geisel Library as a separate collection.
  • Scripps Library. After the Scripps Library consolidation begins in July, library users may request materials from the circulating Scripps collections for one-day paged delivery. Scripps ocean charts, maps, special collections, and the Scripps Archives will move to the 3rd floor of the Eckart Building (on the Scripps campus) where they can be accessed via appointment during the week. Next spring, after compact shelving has been mounted in Geisel Library to accommodate the Scripps Library collections, the Scripps Oceanographic and Physical Sciences materials will be consolidated into the Geisel Library collections, which reflects the wishes of the Scripps community.
  • Other Science collections. While we had proposed the possibility of moving some of our science collections, we have decided that what makes the most sense at this juncture and for the next year, at least, is to keep the Engineering and Physical Sciences collections in the Geisel Library building. The Biomedical Library building will continue to house the high-use collections that support the Division of Biological Sciences, School of Medicine, and the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. This will give us time to construct, deploy, and gain experience with the new compact shelving in Geisel.

While more decisions relating to the disposition of our collections will need to be made over the next few years, this will be a phased and gradual process, based on the experience we gain from how the consolidated collections are used once the compact shelving installation is complete. We will continue to vet our plans with members of the campus community as these develop.  We expect the process of defining just what should be kept on campus to be one that will need continual refinement and adjustments based on experience and feedback. Nevertheless, our guiding principle will be to keep those materials that are actively used and needed to support research and teaching easily accessible on campus.  Those print materials that are also available electronically will largely be moved to offsite storage, either to UC San Diego’s Library Annex or to one of the UC Regional Library Facilities.

Spring 2012

In the summer of 2011, the Libraries embarked on a three-year effort to consolidate our print collections, which was necessary to accommodate a smaller campus footprint.  Our chief goal in this effort has been to retain on campus the unique materials that are most actively used and needed to support current instruction and research. The following Q&A addresses the questions and concerns that faculty and students may have about the process and its possible impacts. We welcome and value feedback from interested members of the campus community.  Collection Consolidation Overview

Q.  Why are the Libraries consolidating their collections?
A.  The UC San Diego Libraries’ state-funded budget has been reduced by $5.5 million (approximately 18%) since 2008-09.  To absorb this kind of cut, the Libraries have reduced expenditures on both collections and operations.

In the area of operations, budget cuts have led to the closure of three facilities: the Medical Center Library in April 2011; the Center for Library & Instructional Computing Services (CLICS) in June 2011; and the International Relations & Pacific Studies (IR/PS) Library in July 2011.  We will also be consolidating the print collections of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Library into the Geisel Library, starting in July 2012. These consolidations have been necessary to accommodate our smaller footprint—from seven to four physical locations.  When these consolidations are completed within the next few years, our collections will reside in:  the Geisel Library; the Biomedical Library building; the Miramar Road Storage Annex; and in the Scripps Special Collections and Library Annex.

In the area of collections, this has meant the elimination of print journal subscriptions that duplicate what we already receive electronically, and that are available at other UC libraries.  It has also meant an overall decrease in the purchasing of new journals as we aim to manage ongoing price increases for subscriptions. In terms of books, it has meant a decrease in print acquisitions and a shift to more eBooks, which can be purchased and made available as needed.


Q.  What criteria are you using to make these consolidation decisions?
A.  Our guiding principles for the location and arrangement of the collections are:  ease of access and preferred use; proximity to the academic divisions and schools that use the materials; and the integration and clustering of collections that support complementary academic divisions.

Our focus has been on the withdrawal of only those materials—mostly older journals and monographs—that have not been used over the last decade, are available in digital format, or are available at other UC libraries or one of the UC Regional Library facilities. Our library collection coordinators, who have significant subject and bibliographic expertise, have managed the reviewing and the withdrawal process.  Unique and rare materials, such as those from our Special Collections, have not been included in this review process.


Q.  Why are you targeting books that have not been used over the last 10 years? How have you arrived at that specific benchmark?
A. This is a widely-accepted standard in the library world. It has also been a longtime UC San Diego Libraries practice to review those monographs more than 10 years old which have not circulated in 10 years when weeding our collections. These books are generally outdated editions and are held elsewhere in the UC system.  This weeding process helps us to accomplish several important goals:  it allows us to accommodate our reduced footprint on campus; it frees up valuable library space needed for more flexible study space; and it provides space for newer, higher-demand materials.  Materials no longer available on campus are held at our Miramar Road Storage Annex or at a UC Regional Library Facility. All are still available on request within two or three working days.

Changes to the Collections

Q.   What has happened so far and what materials have been involved?
A.   Last year the collections from the IR/PS Library and the Medical Center Library were reviewed.
IR/PS materials retained on campus were transferred to the 8th floor of Geisel Library. Medical
Center Library materials retained on campus were consolidated into the Biomedical Library. 

Selected materials—including duplicated and dated items—from both these collections are housed in the Libraries’ Miramar Road Storage Annex or the Southern Regional Library Facility and are available on request.


Q.  How will the consolidated collections be arranged?
A.  Over the next three years, the campus collections will be consolidated and integrated in the Geisel and Biomedical Library buildings. Lesser-used materials are being stored in our offsite Miramar Road Storage Annex or added to the UC Regional Storage Facilities. The plan is to locate the reference materials, actively used books, and print journals from the year 2000 and later, in the Geisel and Biomedical library buildings. Geisel collections would include Mandeville Special Collections, arts, humanities, social sciences, East Asia, engineering, mathematics, and marine sciences materials. Eventually, these materials, including those formerly housed in the IR/PS and Scripps libraries, will be arranged in one call number sequence with the exception of reference, special collections, and media or special formats. The collections housed in the Biomedical Library building would include biological science, medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, and physics materials. Likewise, the general collections housed in this building would be arranged in one call number sequence. The Scripps Special Collections and Library Annex will include the Scripps archives, scientific expedition reports, and other special collections, including the Hubbs collection, nautical charts and selected maps and atlases.


Q.   What other changes to the collections can we expect to see over the next year?
A.   To more effectively consolidate and increase our capacity for library materials, we will be installing compact shelving in Geisel Library during 2012. We have already temporarily relocated some materials from Geisel to the Miramar Road Storage Annex until this project is completed.  These materials include social sciences and humanities oversized materials and pre-1990 bound journals from the Science & Engineering collections.  While many of these journals are available online, the Libraries are providing a scan and delivery service for materials that are not.  We will scan articles from those journals not available online and deliver them to the requester’s desktop.  If a physical volume is needed, users can request it for prompt delivery back to a campus library. Library users who wish to visit the Miramar Road Storage Annex can do so by appointment.  

During this time, we will monitor requests to determine demand and use patterns.  Frequently used materials will be returned to a campus library facility after completion of the consolidated shelving project. We expect it will take us at least a year to transition all of these library collections to the Geisel and Biomedical Library buildings.

After the second phase of compact shelving is completed in the spring of 2013, the Scripps general collection will be moved to Geisel Library.  This means that after the Scripps Library closes to the public in June 2012 and up until spring 2013 when the compact shelving in Geisel Library has been completed, Scripps Library materials will remain in the Eckart Building and will need to be paged.  Scripps Special Collections, Archives, and nautical charts will continue to be housed in the Scripps Eckart building where they will remain accessible to users by appointment, Monday thru Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Accessing Offsite Library Materials

Q.   Are the Libraries committed to the scanning and physical delivery services from the Miramar Road Storage Annex over the long haul?  How long do you plan to offer these services?
A. Yes, as long as we keep these types of materials at the Miramar Road Storage Annex, journal articles will be scanned and physical volumes will be delivered to one of the campus libraries.

Q.   While many faculty members in science and medicine rely mostly on electronic materials, there are faculty members in the social sciences, arts, and humanities that depend far more on printed materials for teaching and research purposes.  How are the Libraries addressing this discrepancy?
A.   We do realize that faculty members have different library needs depending on their discipline. To address the need for physical materials that some faculty members have, we are considering the possibility of providing for delivery of materials to a selected library location.

Collection Locations

Q. Where will print journals prior to the year 2000 be held?
A. Currently, we are planning to store all print journals up to the year 2000 at the Libraries’ offsite annex. These will be scanned on demand or delivered to campus on request. Current periodicals will be shelved by call number.


Q.  Where will the Scripps Library materials be housed?
A.  At the request of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography community, the Scripps Library holdings will primarily reside in Geisel.  After the second phase of compact shelving is completed in Geisel Library in the spring of 2013, the Scripps general collection will be moved to Geisel Library.  After the Scripps Library closes to the public in June 2012 up until the time the compact shelving in Geisel Library has been completed, Scripps Library materials will remain in the Eckart Building and will need to be paged.   In the spring of 2012, we will begin consolidating some of the maps with those in the Geisel building. In June 2012, we will begin the process of consolidating the Scripps Library collections—with the exception of the Scripps Archives and special collections—with those housed in Geisel.  The Scripps Archives, which house a wide range of historic materials on Scripps and UC San Diego, will remain in the Scripps Archives and Library Annex in the Eckart building, where they will continue to be accessible by appointment, Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Q.  What about the Science & Engineering Library?  Where will those materials reside?
A.  Our current plans call for  the physics and chemistry resources to be  integrated in the Biomedical Library building, where they will complement the existing life sciences collections in that facility, sometime in 2013.  This includes the current periodicals and books. Those materials in engineering and mathematical sciences will continue to be housed in the Geisel Library building, where they will remain in close proximity to the Jacobs School of Engineering.  This decision is not final, however, and we encourage feedback from affected faculty to ensure that our decision about the location of the collections best meets the needs of the campus community.

Q,  What about the other library collections?
A .  Our current plans call for the integration of the collections that remain in the Geisel and Biomedical libraries. As a result of budget cuts and the consolidations that have accompanied them, the Libraries are transitioning from a discipline-based and decentralized structure to a comprehensive library in two locations that offers a suite of services across its facilities. Consequently, our collections will be arranged in one call number order in these two buildings, rather than by discipline.  Again, we encourage campus feedback to ensure that our decisions about the arrangement of the collections meet the needs of our users.

Collection Consolidation