Elections and Events 1811-1849

1811

Booth 2006:  “El Salvador entered the national period with most of its economy built around the production, extraction, and export of indigo dye” (page 96).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “During the colonial period, landholding peasant communities were subjected to a series of colonial impositions…After independence these long-standing colonial practices ended, and the power of the Salvadoran…elites that benefited from these policies weakened” (page 34).  “The new state did not, and probably could not, challenge the right of Indian or Ladino communities and municipalities to own and control land” (page 35).  “In the early nineteenth century, officials paid little heed to Indians as a category, even though political events were closely determined by the alignment of various Indian communities.  Later the ethnic composition of the population received more attention, and government statistics aimed to reflect these divisions.  What an Indian was varied dramatically from place to place” (page 58).  “(D)uring the process of independence (1811-1821), in which Indian, Ladino, and mulatto peasants and artisans were integral actors, local elites—creoles and ‘peninsulares’—became divided and weakened, and regional means of social control were dissolved.  Officials of the newly independent state could not sustain the delicate ethnic balancing act of their colonial predecessors” (page 105).

November

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “Entre el 5 de noviembre y el arribo de Aycinena y Peinado mediaron veintiocho días, de un relativo ‘gobierno autónomo’” (page 22).

Figeac 1938:  “La conmoción de 5 de noviembre logró deponer de sus funciones al corregidor-intendente don Antonio Gutiérrez y Ulloa, estableciendo en su lugar, una Junta gubernativa; también fueron abolidos los reales derechos y cerrados los estancos, al mismo tiempo que se perseguía a los europeos” (page 57).

Karnes 1976:  “In November of 1811 momentary success was achieved in San Salvador by a revolt under the leadership of Manuel José Arce, Juan Manuel Rodríguez, and two priests, José Matías Delgado and Nicolás Aguilar.  But when the other principal Salvadorean towns—Sonsonate, San Miguel, and Santa Ana—remained loyal, the uprising collapsed.  Bustamante dismissed several officials, punished the ringleaders, and restored quiet to El Salvador” (page 13).

Larde y Larin 1958: “En San Salvador se dio el primer Grito de Independencia de Centro América, el 5 de Noviembre de 1811" (page 20).

Lauria Santiago 1995:  “Durante noviembre de 1811, los indios de [Cojutepeque] se levantaron en apoyo de la autonomía local…Durante la revuelta, dirigida contra los ‘realistas’, destituyeron a los funcionarios de la Corona española.  Los indios de los pueblos cercanos, en el departamento de La Paz, también participaron en este movimiento…Esta revuelta indica claramente el clásico resentimiento popular contra los privilegios estatales controlados por españoles durante el fin del régimen borbónico” (page 239).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(E)n unión del Prócer Manuel José Arce, [José Matías Delgado] dirigió el movimiento insurreccional del 5 de noviembre de 1811.  En esta fecha se atribuye al Padre Delgado que lanzó el Primer Grito de Libertad” (page 9).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 5, 1811—“(E)l Intendente don Antonio Gutiérrez y Ulloa pide a los amotinados que nombren a una persona con quien poder entenderse sobre sus pretensiones:  el pueblo nombra a don Manuel José Arce como su Diputado para tal objeto.  Los patriotas…deponen al Gobernador Intendente de la Provincia de San Salvador, don Antonio Gutiérrez y Ulloa; y nombran Alcaldes y Gobernador.  Don Leandro Fagoaga fué encargado del Gobierno” (page 16).  Noviembre 30, 1811—“Los otros tres Partidos de la Provincia:  San Miguel, Santa Ana y San Vicente, lo mismo que Sonsonate, impugnan el pronunciamiento de San Salvador…Se armaron y se dispusieron a reprimir el pronunciamiento de San Salvador…Los patriotas de San Salvador al encontrarse aislados y escarnecidos por los que debían de colaborar, tuvieron que abandonar su empresa” (page 22).

White 1973:  “(U)pon the announcement of the arrest of two ‘criollo’ leaders who were priests as well as ‘hacendados’ the ‘ladino’ crowd gathered on 4 November 1811 in San Salvador which precipitated the overthrow of ‘intendente’ Gutiérrez y Ulloa” (page 59). 

Wortman 1982:  “The collapse in the demand for indigo, and other important factors, led the well-integrated colonial economy to suffer severe depression from 1803 until the eve of independence” (page 184).  “Beset by the severe problems caused by the decline in indigo production, with the drive towards liberalism throughout the empire, and the example of the Mexican Revolution, a group of conspirators, headed by the prelate Doctor Matías Delgado, seized the armory in San Salvador and deposed the intendant in 1811.  All of the plotters were members of the leading families of the region and were later, after independence, to play significant roles in the Central American federal government” (page 204).

December

Figeac 1938:  “Diéronse poderes amplios al coronel don José de Aycinena para que se hiciese cargo del gobierno de la rebelde Provincia; y el 3 de diciembre…entró en San Salvador el nuevo jefe…Aycinena se presentó en la capital salvadoreña sin alardes guerreros, en son de paz y demostrando benignidad y confianza, por lo que al captarse las simpatias generales le fue fácil afianzar el sosiego público sin acudir a la violencia” (page 58).

White 1973:  “With the delicate balance of forces in Guatemala, the governor there found it more prudent in this situation not to send an army against San Salvador, but rather to despatch two Guatemalan ‘criollos,’ acceptable to the rebels, to take over the government peacefully.  One of these was appointed ‘intendente,’ thus confirming the rebels’ deprivation of the ‘peninsular’ occupant of this office and his replacement by a colonial” (page 60).

1812

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “La obra más importante de estas Cortes fue la Constitución del 19 de marzo de 1812.  El Reino de Guatemala, al igual que otras colonias americanas, tuvo sus diputados en esta Asamblea.  La ciudad [de San Salvador] estuvo representada por el presbítero y doctor…José Ignacio Ávila” (page 15).

Figeac 1938:  “Don José María Peinado sucedió al coronel Aycinena a principios de 1812, gastando también con sus gobernados una política de reconciliación” (page 58).

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1812—“Restablecida la Constitución española, promulgada en Cádiz, se entabló la lucha política en todo el Reino de Guatemala para la elección de Diputados y Municipalidades” (page 28).

White 1973:  “The beleaguered parliament of Cadiz of 1808-1813 was more liberal in mood than any Madrid government could have been expected to be at the time:  it was in an extraordinary position, with the king whose legitimate authority it upheld a prisoner of the French, and a Frenchman sitting on the throne in Madrid.  Its main aim ‘vis-à-vis’ Spanish America was to get as much help as possible from the colonies in the fighting against the French.  For these two reasons, it acceded to the colonials’ wish for representation, and ‘criollo’ delegates attended from all over Latin America including San Salvador.  Moreover, being a liberal body, it decreed in its Constitution of 1812 that all were equal before the law, and established the popular election of town councils:  this meant that ‘ladinos’ were admitted onto the council in San Salvador” (pages 58-59).

Wortman 1982:  “The Spanish Cortes that sat after 1812 was the intellectual heir of the enlightened monarchs, continuing those policies that war, invasion, and the collapse of central rule had disrupted…The Cortes’ most radical measure was the Provincial Deputation that removed much authority from the audiencia, providing a greater voice in political decisions to the local level in the various regions of the empire.  The deputation introduced indirect election for officials who administered localities.  Its members were chosen by cabildos with the president of the audiencia holding the only appointed seat” (pages 200-201).

1813

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1813—“En San Salvador aparecen en las paredes de las calles, pasquines políticos de los independientes, con motivo de las elecciones de los Alcaldes” (page 29). 

December

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “(L)os alcaldes electos por el pueblo [fueron] Juan Manuel Rodríguez y Pedro Pablo Castillo” (page 29).

Monterey 1977:  Diciembre 1813—“Verificadas las elecciones de Alcaldes de barrios, éstas fueron ganadas por los independientes, el Intendente las anula y manda a practicarlas nuevamente, fueron una vez más ganadas por los patriotas…El Intendente fué derrotado una tercera vez en las elecciones de Electores, y por cuarta vez, en la elección del Ayuntamiento, las cuales fueron ganadas por los patriotas…El Intendente Peinado apeló de las elecciones ante el Capitán General, por no estar conforme con la designación de los electos” (page 33).

White 1973:  “(I)n 1812 and 1813 the opposition between the ‘intendente’ Peinado and the majority of ‘criollos’ backed by overwhelming popular support from ‘ladinos’ became steadily more bitter and open.  The ‘intendente’ escalated the confrontation by organizing a corps of volunteers to add to his regular army…and then by three times annulling the municipal elections which were held under the new Cadiz constitution, for no better reason than that the results were favourable to the ‘subversives’” (page 60).  “Eventually he had to let the elections stand, and the most prominent ‘ladino’ in the events of 1811, Pedro Pablo Castillo, became one of the two ‘alcaldes’ of the town.  The constitution also provided for ‘alcaldes’ of wards, and ‘ladinos’ were elected to these positions too” (page 61).

1814

January

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “A mediados de enero de 1814 arreciaron las fechorías de los ‘Voluntarios’, especialmente contra los alcaldes de los barrios y las familias criollas que mantenían contactos subversivos con Guatemala y León” (page 29).  “Peinado…veía el fantasma de la conspiración por doquier, y armó a los ‘Voluntarios.’  El 23 de enero fueron apresados varios alcaldes de barrio, acusados de agitadores…El 24 de enero estalló el motín popular capitaneado por Manuel José Arce y Domingo Antonio de Lara…Hubo heridos y muertos…Una calma aparente llenó la ciudad.  Pero el 27 de enero, estalló nuevamente la lucha en la plaza y el mercado.  Fueron hechos prisioneros Arce, Lara y Miguel Delgado” (page 30).

Tilley 2005:  “Open ethnic conflict had erupted in 1814, when Indians rebelled against the illegal continued collection of tribute and attacked the provincial capital of San Salvador” (page 115).

White 1973:  “The first fighting between the two ethnic groups [Indians and ladinos] took place in 1814, at the time of the revolt led by Pedro Pablo Castillo in San Salvador.  At that time the Indians were demanding the return of the tribute they had paid to the local authorities.  Tribute had been abolished by the Cadiz parliament in 1811, but it appears that in Los Nonualcos, and possibly in the rest of El Salvador, the authorities had continued collecting it” (pages 71-72).

1820

Karnes 1976:  “The city of San Salvador posed the greatest threat to Guatemalan domination and equally feared Guatemala City as more repressive than the mother country.  Some of this ambition was political, some economic and some religious.  There is good reason to believe that the last of these was the most important…In the decade after 1811 the chief candidate for the expected opening [as bishop] was the strong Liberal leader, José Matías Delgado.  He openly advocated the separation of El Salvador from Guatemala in civil matters the better to achieve ecclesiastical independence…It is of major importance that by 1820 many Central Americans were as opposed to membership in a political organization headed by Guatemala as they were to remaining in the Spanish empire” (pages 15-16).

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 25, 1820—“El Ayuntamiento de San Salvador da un pliego...en la cual consta que la Intendencia comprende los Partidos de San Salvador, San Vicente, San Miguel y Santa Ana, los cuales están divididos, a su vez, en quince Partidos Subalternos, en los cuales hay como 207,500 habitantes, repartidos en tres ciudades, dos villas, ciento veintisiete pueblos, ochenta y dos aldeas, cuatrocientas cuarenta y siete haciendas y cuarenta Curatos” (page 59).

White 1973:  “Between 1814 and 1820, with Ferdinand tolerating no compromises like ‘criollo’ representation in government, the conflict became a clear-cut question on a continental scale of submission to Spain or independence…In Central America nothing was even tried:  the advocates of independence waited for a more hopeful situation to arise” (page 61).

1821

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El Dr. [Pedro] Barriere había sustituido a principios de 1821 en la Intendencia y Gobernación de la Provincia de San Salvador, al General y Dr. José María Peinado, que había fallecido” (page 5).

February

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 24, 1821—“El General del Ejército Español, Agustín de Iturbide, proclama en Iguala, la independencia de México” (page 60).

Woodward 1985:  “Iturbide’s Plan de Iguala in Mexico forced the issue of independence into [Central American] politics in…1821” (page 88).

August

Monterey 1977:  Agosto 1821—“El Capitán General del Reino de Guatemala, Brigadier Gabino Gaínza, publica un manifiesto en contra de la Independencia de Centro América y manda procesar a los independientes” (page 61).  Agosto 12, 1821—“En Chiapas, en la ciudad de Comitán, se dió el Primer Grito de la libertad de las seis Provincias de Centro América, independiente del sistema de gobierno de México” (page 61).

September

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(E)l Dr. Barriere [cubano] gobernó desde el 21 de septiembre de 1821 [al 28 de noviembre de 1821].  Fue el último Intendente Colonial y el Primer Gobernante en carácter de Jefe Político con funciones de Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia.  Cuando Manuel José Arce, al frente de un puñado de entusiastas salvadoreños, que deseaban votar por los individuos de una Junta Económica Consultiva, se presentaron el 30 de septiembre del mismo año de 1821, ante el Intendente Dr. Barriere, éste eludió la elección para la cual ya se había convocado, puso muchos pretextos, disolviendo la reunión y mandando a encarcelar a los patriotas” (page 5).

Lindo-Fuentes 1990:  “No armed struggle was necessary to end colonial rule; the Spaniards were too busy trying to retain Mexico and its wealth to pay much attention to the poor region of Central America…After the news came that the Mexican independence was a fact, a meeting was held on the fifteenth of September with all the authorities of the colony and, after deciding in favor of independence, an act to that effect was written and signed…Central America gained independence as a single country, and not until 1839 were the individual states going to separate…A newly independent country had been signed into existence, but the new leaders did not quite agree on what to do with it” (page 36).  “(T)he end of Spanish rule left a power vacuum that horrified Guatemalan merchants…Independence…brought into the open deep divisions that had existed since the late eighteenth century.  The bitter struggle between liberals and conservatives acquired new strength.  The resentments created by the heavy-handed practices of the Guatemalan merchants were translated into resentments from the provinces against Guatemala” (page 37).

Marure 1895:  “Septiembre 29—Se verifica en la ciudad capital de la provincia de San Salvador la solemne proclamación de la independencia absoluta, jurada ya desde el 22 del mismo mes de septiembre por el Intendente, Diputación provincial, y demás autoridades locales” (page 2).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 15, 1821—“En la Ciudad de Guatemala la Junta Popular convocada por el Ayuntamiento, a instancia de los patriotas, declara por vez primera, la emancipación política de Centro America” (page 62).  Reproduces the “Acta de Independencia” (pages 62-65).

Woodward 1985:  “The success of Iturbide’s Plan and indications that a Mexican army might be forthcoming to ‘liberate’ Central America had much to do with Guatemala’s decision to declare the kingdom independent on September 15, 1821…The immediate issue became not independence from Spain, but rather the alternatives of being an independent republic versus being annexed to the Mexican Empire” (page 89).

November

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “José Matías Delgado toma posesión como Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia de San Salvador y envía al exilio a Pedro Berrier” (page 44).

Figeac 1938:  “Se acordó…señalar un mes, contable a partir del 30 de noviembre, para que los pueblos del antiguo Reino de Guatemala expresaran su parecer en Cabildo abierto” (page 68).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Presbitero y doctor José Matías Delgado (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Político Civil:  28 noviembre de 1821 al 9 de febrero de 1823” (page 7).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 28, 1821—“El Doctor José Matías Delgado, toma posesión de la Intendencia y Gobernación de la Provincia de San Salvador, y nombra la Junta de Gobierno...Se instala en San Salvador la Junta de Gobierno, siendo el Doctor José Matías Delgado el Presidente, y los miembros que la componían, los ciudadanos Manuel José Arce, Juan Manuel Rodríguez, Leandro Fagoaga, Presbítero José Miguel de Castro, Juan Fornos y el Presbítero Basilio Saldaña, Secretario don Mariano Fagoaga...El Intendente de la Provincia de San Salvador, Doctor José Matías Delgado, convoca a los pueblos de la Provincia, para que elijan Diputados a la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador...Noviembre 30, 1821—El Capitán General Gaínza...convoca a ‘Cabildo Abierto’, para oír la opinión de los Ayuntamientos, sobre la anexión al Imperio de México” (page 71).

December

Monterey 1977:  Iturbide communicates his intent to annex the provinces of Central America to Mexico should they refuse to join his empire willingly (page 72).

1822

January

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “El 5 de enero la Junta Provisional Consultiva decreta la anexión a México, en San Salvador no es acatada esta resolución y se constituye una Junta de Gobierno, nombrando como Comandante general a Manuel José Arce” (page 44).

Figeac 1938:  “23 Ayuntamientos dijeron que solamente el Congreso General podría resolver la proposición; 104, entre los que estaba la casi totalidad de los pueblos enclavados en lo que al día es territorio guatemalteco, dijeron que se acordara la unión a México; 11 se decidieron por la anexión propuesta, pero bajo condiciones; 32 dejaron al arbitrio de la Junta Provisional la resolución del delicado asunto; varios Ayuntamientos no contestaron la excitativa; y solamente San Salvador y Granada se declaron categórica y francamente, contra el funesto paso de la anexión…El 5 de enero de 1822, haciendo a un lado la desfavorable actitud de los Ayuntamientos de San Salvador y Granada y el silencio que otros guardaban como tácita protesta, fue declarada la unión propuesta por don Agustín de Iturbide…El sabio Valle pedía que se oyera el parecer de 67 Ayuntamientos que no habían contestado, pero sus argumentaciones resultaron estériles” (page 68).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En enero 11 de 1822 en San Salvador, presididos por el padre Delgado, el Ayuntamiento y numeroso público protestan por la resolución de la Junta Consultiva del Gobierno de Guatemala de incorporar a Centro América al Imperio Mexicano.  En esta fecha el Gobierno de San Salvador se separa de Guatemala en lo económico, político y gubernativo” (page 9).

Marure 1895:  “Enero 5—La Junta gubernativa de Guatemala declara que la voluntad de la mayoría de los pueblos que componían el Reyno, estaba pronunciada por la unión al imperio mejicano—San Salvador y Granada desconocen la legitimidad de esta declaratoria y resuelven sostener con las armas el pronunciamiento de independencia absoluta” (page 5).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 5, 1822—“Verificado en Guatemala el escrutinio de los votos de los Ayuntamientos, según el acuerdo de Noviembre 30 de 1821, resultó que, algunos Ayuntamientos se adhierieron a la anexión a México; otros proponían que el Congreso Constituyente resolviera; otros no contestaron categóricamente; y muchos no recibieron la excitativa; San Salvador y San Vicente se niegan a reconocer el nuevo amo que se les proponía...Enero 7, 1822—El Capitán General Gaínza comunica al Ayuntamiento de San Salvador, que el cinco del mes, la Junta Consultiva del Gobierno de Guatemala acordó la unión al Imperio Mexicano de toda Centro América” (page 74).  On January 11, San Salvador’s Junta Provisional Gubernativa decides to separate from Guatemala in protest over Gaínza’s decision to join Iturbide and renames itself the Junta de Gobierno (page 75).  “Santa Ana, Sonsonate y San Miguel se declaran unidas al Imperio de México” (page 76).

Vidal 1970:  “Junta Provincial” of El Salvador becomes “Junta de Gobierno” in January 1822.  Gives names of members (page 142).

White 1973:  “The conservative ‘criollo’ interests which existed in all the towns but were strongest in Guatemala were inclined at first to favour inclusion in a conservative Mexico, as a strong state in which their local interests would be respected and preserved.  The liberals of the rest of the isthmus, whose main fear at first was a Guatemalan hegemony, assented to this inclusion in Mexico, and Central America became a part of Mexico from 5 January 1822 until 1 July 1823.  The single exception to this consent was San Salvador with San Vicente:  the dominant liberals here were just as opposed to a conservative Mexican regime as a Guatemalan one” (page 63).

Woodward 1985:  “In the province there were mixed reactions to the decisions made by the central government in Guatemala.  Establishment of three ‘comandancias,’ with seats of power at Ciudad Real (with jurisdiction over Chiapas and Los Altos), Guatemala (Guatemala and El Salvador), and León (Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica), followed the precedent of the provincial deputations, but challenged more traditional provincial loyalties.  While the majority of the ayuntamientos of the kingdom approved of annexation, there was notable opposition in San Salvador, which had become the leader of the attack on the hegemony of the capital” (pages 89-90).

Wortman 1982:  “The January 3 decision to unite was far from unanimous:  115 towns voted for adhesion, 32 desired independence with Guatemala, 23 chose to leave the decision to a future Congress, and 77 cabildos did not respond.  Thus, with less than 50 percent of the municipalities voting in favor of the union, Central America joined Mexico.  Still Central America was far from united.  Each cabildo considered itself autonomous, and few recognized the prerogatives of Guatemala as a national capital” (page 230).  “The indigo-producing areas of Santa Ana, San Miguel, and Gotera, controlled by families outside the city of San Salvador, pledged union to the central government and separation from the old province.  Guatemala sent officials to San Miguel to take command of the civilian militia…The leadership in Salvador responded,…threatening retaliation if Guatemala dismembered Salvador” (page 231).

February

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En febrero comienzan los enfrentamientos entre Guatemala y El Salvador por las diferencias frente a la anexión” (page 44).

March

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “La Junta Provisional de Gobierno erige el Obispado de San Salvador; nombrando a José Matías Delgado como obispo” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “La Junta Provisional Gubernativa también tomó una de las decisiones más polémicas de la época:  el 30 de marzo de 1822 erigió el Obispado de San Salvador haciéndose nombrar Delgado, Obispo…El paso dio origen a un cisma religioso ante la oposición del Arzobispo de Guatemala” (page 51).

Figeac 1938:  “Cumpliendo instrucciones del jefe político superior, salió de Guatemala el 19 de marzo el coronel don Manuel Arzú, comandando un ejército que debería tomar la ciudad de San Salvador” (page 69).

Llanes 1995:  “In El Salvador a sector of the clergy had a leading role in the movement for independence.  A chief motive for the ‘criollo’ clergy to become involved in independence was their desire for a Salvadorian diocese.  The Salvadorian legislature decreed on 30 March 1822 the erection of a Salvadorian diocese and the election of Matías Delgado as bishop of El Salvador.  The decree was repudiated by Archbishop Ramón Casaus…[who] resided in Guatemala and was a strong supporter of the Conservative party” (page 40).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 30—La Junta gubernativa de San Salvador acuerda erigir en una nueva diócesis aquella provincia y nombra por su primer Obispo al presbítero doctor José Matías Delgado” (page 5).

April

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En abril de 1822, el Coronel Manuel Arzú, al mando de tropas guatemaltecas, ocupa militarmente Santa Ana y Sonsonate” (page 9).

June

Bonilla 2000:  “El gobierno derrotó una invasión guatemalteca encabezada por el General Manuel Arzú, el 3 de junio de 1822” (page 51).

Figeac 1938:  “Las fuerzas invasoras llegaron fácilmente a la capital salvadoreña y la tomaron…Los soldados guatemaltecos se dedicaron al pillaje…(E)sta conducta exasperó a los vencidos, hasta el grado de reorganizarse para atacar a sus vencedores, lo que felizmente hicieron el 4 de junio” (page 69).  “El 12 de junio entró en Guatemala el general don Vicente Filísola…(T)raía instrucciones de substituir a Gainza en la jefatura política de Guatemala” (page 70).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 3—El Coronel don Manuel Arzú, á la cabeza de un cuerpo de tropas guatemaltecas, denominado ‘Columna Imperial,’ ataca la plaza de San Salvador, y logra penetrar en su recinto; pero después de un largo tiroteo…es repelido y obligado á retirarse” (page 6).

Wortman 1982:  “In June 1822 a Guatemalan force invaded Salvador, easily outflanked its troops, and took San Salvador.  The Guatemalans immediately disbanded and began sacking the city.  The Salvadorans reformed quickly, marched on San Salvador, caught the Guatemalans disorganized, and easily defeated them...Soon after the Guatemalan defeat, the Mexican commander Vicente Filísola arrived [in Guatemala], took command, organized the regime, freed those liberals who remained in jail, and imposed some stability.  He could not, however, deal with the secessionist tendencies of the provinces” (page 231).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1, 1822—“El Emperador Iturbide ordena al Brigadier Filísola que ataque a la Provincia de San Salvador, si inmediatamente no se une a México, sobre las bases de una entera sumisión al Gobierno Imperial, y sin condición alguna que pudiese contrariarla... Octubre 2, 1822—La Junta de Gobierno de la Provincia de San Salvador...convoca a un Congreso a los Representantes del Pueblo, para que pronuncien el sistema político que más les convenga aceptar...El Congreso se reunirá en la ciudad de San Salvador el diez del mes de Noviembre próximo, las elecciones se harán de nuevo, con arreglo a la Constitución de España, y por la base de un Diputado por cada cinco mil habitantes, las primeras Juntas Electorales de parroquia, se celebrarán el domingo 13 del corriente; las Juntas Electorales de Partido, el domingo veinte siguiente, y el veintisiete las de Provincia, pora nombrar los Diputados” (pages 95-96).

November

Bonilla 2000:  “La provincia de San Salvador…había comenzado a gobernarse independientemente y a constituir sus órganos estatales.  Se convocó a un Congreso Legislativo Extraordinario, que inició sesiones el 10 de noviembre de 1822.  Este cuerpo político ratificó la erección de la Diócesis en San Salvador y el nombramiento de Delgado como Obispo.  Delgado devino, así, un hombre poderoso al ocupar, simultáneamente, las máximas sillas del poder secular y espiritual” (page 51).

Marure 1895:  “Noviembre 1o—Se instaló el Congreso provincial de San Salvador, en la ciudad de este nombre, convocado con el objeto de resolver si aquella provincia debía permanecer independiente ó incorporarse al imperio mejicano” (page 6).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 10, 1822—“Se reúne en San Salvador el Congreso Legislativo Extraordinario con treinta y tres Representantes” (page 97).

December

Marure 1895:  “Diciembre 2—El Congreso provincial de San Salvador declara unida aquella provincia á los Estados-Unidos del Norte de América, adoptando en todas partes la Constitución de aquella República, y con calidad de formar un nuevo Estado en la federación norte-americana…Este acuerdo, dictado solamente con la idea de imponer al Jefe de las fuerzas imperiales que asediaban á San Salvador, no tuvo ningún resultado ni pasó de una de esas medidas que se adoptan indeliberadamente en momento de conflicto” (page 7).

Monterey 1977:  Under the threat of attack from Mexican forces, delegates to the Salvadoran congress vote on December 2, 1822 to annex themselves to the United States (page 98).  Diciembre 31, 1822—“El Secretario de Guerra y Marina del Imperio Mexicano, ordena al Brigadier Filísola, tomar a toda costa la Ciudad de San Salvador, disolver el Congreso y aplicar la pena de muerte conforme a la ordenanza” (page 100).

Vidal 1970:  Gives number of representatives in the “Congreso Provincial” of El Salvador in December 1822 and describes their vote for annexation to the United States (page 145).

White 1973:  “It was during the period of liberal ascendancy, when San Salvador was for a time successfully resisting the onslaught of the Mexican and Guatemalan forces, that the curious idea arose of requesting the admission of El Salvador into the United States of America as a member state.  The motion was carried on 5 December 1822, by the Legislative Congress that had been convened, and five of the leading liberals went to Washington.  But they did not set off until after the fall of San Salvador to the Mexican army and the overthrow of Iturbide; these events changed the situation and they waited for four months in the United States while it became clearer:  they never made the request” (page 64).

1823

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Así terminó su período de Gobierno el Presbítero y Dr. José Matías Delgado y la primera Junta de Gobierno [el 9 de febrero 1823]” (page 10).  “Brigadier Vicente Filísola (mexicano e italiano) asumió la Jefatura de Hecho:  9 febrero al 7 de mayo de 1823…El 10 del mismo mes el Brigadier Filísola declara anexado al Imperio Mexicano la Provincia de San Salvador” (page 15).

Lindo-Fuentes 1990:  “Mexican troops invaded San Salvador for a second time and forced the state into submission…The number of people involved in the military operations, the pillage, and the other means used to finance the armies were enough to deplete the almost empty coffers of the new nation.  Guatemalan, Mexican, and Salvadoran troops had been mobilized from March of 1822 until February of the following year…Rather than filling the power vacuum created by independence the Mexican invasion helped to expose the divisions that would plague Central America for two decades” (page 38).

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 7—El General don Vicente Filísola á la cabeza de una división de tropas imperiales de cerca de dos mil hombres, se posesiona de la plaza de San Salvador á viva fuerza.  Febrero 10—Sojuzgada por las armas imperiales, la ciudad de San Salvador, verifica la solemne proclamación y juramento de unión al imperio mejicano” (page 7).  “Febrero 21—Las fuerzas salvadoreñas que se retiraron de la plaza de San Salvador después del ataque del 7 de febrero, capitulan en Gualsinze con el General Filísola.  Con este suceso se consumó el completo sometimiento de la provincia de San Salvador al imperio mejicano” (page 8).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 9, 1823—“Entra a la ciudad de San Salvador el Brigadier Filísola con su ejército; respeta las personas y bienes y asume el mando supremo de la Provincia...Febrero 10, 1823—El Brigadier Filísola declara anexado al Imperio Mexicano a la Provincia El Salvador...Febrero 19, 1823—El Emperador Iturbide abdica la Corona Imperial de México” (page 104).

White 1973:  “(T)he army sent from Mexico and Guatemala…defeated Salvadorean resistance in February 1823.  Iturbide was overthrown in the same month by the opponents of his Napoleonic aspirations in Mexico, and after that little support remained in Central America for the incorporation into Mexico” (page 63).

March

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En marzo, Filísola nombra al Coronel Felipe Codallos intendente y gobernador de la provincia de El Salvador” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “Filísola convocó a la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente el 29 de marzo de 1823” (page 52).

Figeac 1938:  “El 29 de marzo de 1823, [Filísola] presentó a la Diputación Provincial de Guatemala el decreto de convocatoria a elecciones...El decreto electoral reunió en los comicios públicos a los miembros de los partidos conservador y liberal, obteniendo el triunfo éstos últimos” (page 72).

White 1973:  “After the abdication of Emperor Agustín I (Iturbide), the Mexican General Filísola who was in command of the army in Guatemala, and in El Salvador…summoned representatives from [the Central American states] to a National Constituent Assembly in Guatemala” (page 64).

April

Figeac 1938:  “Las elecciones se efectuaron sin incidentes desagradables y de esta primera función del sufragio salieron triunfantes las candidaturas de los diputados que deberían representar en el Congreso a la Provincia de San Salvador” (page 72).  Lists the names of those elected with the Salvadoran towns they represented.

Herrera 2005:  “Los centroamericanos eligieron a sus diputados y estos—básicamente los guatemaltecos y los de San Salvador, pues los de las otras provincias, por su lejanía, llegaron tarde—conformaron la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente” (page 920).

Lindo-Fuentes 1990:  “After the Mexicans left, the main authority was the ‘Asamblea Nacional Constituyente,’ which was elected to write the constitution of the federation and began at once to enact a liberal program” (page 46).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 1823—“En la Provincia de El Salvador fueron electos Diputados al Congreso Nacional Constituyente...Al efectuarse las elecciones...predominaron en las Provincias los independientes sobre los anexionistas, derrotados por la caída del Imperio mexicano.  En la Asamblea tenía que predominar el partido liberal o fiebre, quien quería establecer el sistema federal...; los anexionistas, llamados conservadores y serviles, opinaban por el sistema central unitario” (page 106).  Gives the names of deputies.

May

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En mayo es obligado a salir Codallos y se nombra como Jefe Supremo a Mariano Prado” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “En San Salvador, en el mes de mayo, el Ayuntamiento y el pueblo amotinado obligan al Intendente y Gobernador impuesto por México, Felipe Codallos, y a sus soldados a evacuar la ciudad.  Mariano Prado fue nombrado Jefe Supremo Político y gobernaba cuando se estableció la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente” (page 52).

Figeac 1938:  “(S)e reconcentró Filísola a Guatemala, dejando en el gobierno de la Provincia de San Salvador al coronel Codallos, el día 7 de mayo de 1823” (page 71).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Felipe Codallos (guatemalteco) gobernó como Jefe Militar Civil:  7 al 25 de mayo de 1823…El 25 de mayo…tomó el Poder una Junta Consultiva” (page 17).  “Gobernó del 25 de mayo al 17 de junio de 1823” (page 19).

Monterey 1977:  May 1823—“En San Salvador el Ayuntamiento y el pueblo amotinado obligan al Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia, el imperialista coronel Felipe Codallos y a sus quinientos soldados mexicanos y guatemaltecos, a evacuar la ciudad.  Fueron nombrados:  Jefe Supremo Político, don Mariano Prado; Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia de San Salvador, el coronel José Justo Milla y Comandante Militar el coronel José de Rivas” (page 107).

June

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En junio se instala la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centroamérica” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “El Congreso…se inauguró en Guatemala el 24 de junio de 1823” (page 52).

Herrera 2005:  “La Asamblea se instaló el 24 de junio y abrió sus sesiones el 29.  Entre los diputados que representaban a la Provincia de San Salvador estaba el cura José Matías Delgado, quien fue electo presidente de aquella corporación soberana, debido a la admiración que se había granjeado al liderar la oposición armada contra los mexicanos.  Cuando la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente abrió sus sesiones, la mayoría de sus diputados eran republicanos.  Sus opositores los llamaron, a partir de ese momento, ‘liberales’ y ‘fiebres,’ por la manera acalorada con que defendieron sus posturas.  La minoría recibió el nombre de ‘serviles’ y ‘moderados,’ hallándose entre ellos los adeptos a la unión mexicana, así como también los que defendían los intereses de las grandes familias guatemaltecas y del clero.  La historiografía posterior llamó a los primeros ‘liberales’ y a los segundos ‘conservadores’” (page 920).

Karnes 1976:  “Nearly three months after Filísola summoned them, the first delegates met in Guatemala City on June 24, 1823…The provinces had followed the stipulations of the act of independence of 1821 which authorized one delegate for each fifteen thousand persons and directed that the existing electoral ‘juntas’ make the selections.  The total allotment was sixty-four—Guatemala, twenty-eight; El Salvador, thirteen; Honduras, eleven; Nicaragua, eight; and Costa Rica, four—but this figure was not achieved until October.  In the meantime, blessed by the archbishop, a near-quorum of forty one Guatemalans and Salvadoreans began the task of ruling the Central American people.  Calling itself the National Constituent Assembly, this body was at the same time the government of Central America and the agency charged with drafting a constitution for the permanent republic of Central American states” (page 35).

Leistenschneider 1980:  La Junta Consultiva “entregó el Poder Supremo a don Mariano Prado el 17 de junio de 1823” (page 19).  “Don Mariano Prado (nicaragüense) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  17 de junio de 1823 al 22 de abril de 1824” (page 21).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 24—A virtud de la convocatoria expedida en 29 de marzo anterior, se instala en la ciudad de Guatemala, bajo la presidencia del presbítero doctor don José Matías Delgado, el Congreso General de las provincias que formaban el antiguo Reyno de aquel nombre” (page 10).

Monterey 1977:  Junio 8, 1823—“Llegan al puerto norteamericano de Boston los comisionados de la Provincia de El Salvador...comisionados para la admisión de la Provincia de El Salvador como Estado de la Federación de los Estados Unidos de Norte América...Junio 24, 1823—“Se instala en la ciudad de Guatemala el Congreso Nacional Constituyente de Centro América.  Asamblea compuesta de cuarenta y un Representantes, de los más célebres, instruidos y acreditados ciudadanos:  fué electo Presidente de aquella memorable Asamblea el Presbítero Dr. José Matías Delgado, por treinta y siete votos; como Vice-Presidente, el Presbítero Fernando Antonio Dávila” (page 107).

White 1973:  The national constituent assembly in Guatemala “sat from June 1823 until January 1825” (page 64).

July

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En julio, el Congreso declara su independencia de México, y la antigua Capitanía General recibe el nombre de Provincias Unidas de Centroamérica” (page 44).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 1, 1823—“La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centro América hace la segunda declaración de emancipación, declarando libres e independientes de España, México y de cualquiera otra potencia, a las Provincias centroamericanas,...que en lo sucesivo formarán un sólo Cuerpo Político con la denominación de Provincias Unidas de Centro América...La Asamblea...nombra para...Presidente el General Arce...El partido de los liberales adversó la candidatura para Presidente del Brigadier Vicente Filísola, que apoyaban los conservadores” (page 108).

White 1973:  The national constituent assembly “declared, on 1 July 1823, a new absolute independence as the United Provinces of Central America, covering these five states” (page 64).

Woodward 1985:  “(T)he abdication of Iturbide in March 1823 led to a declaration of absolute Central American independence on July 1” (pages 90-91).

August

Marure 1895:  “Agosto 22—Se dio el título de villas á los pueblos de Ahuachapán y Metapán en el departamento de Santa Ana, Estado del Salvador” (page 13).

September

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 11, 1823—“Los Comisionados de El Salvador en Washington presentan a aquel Gobierno las actas de incorporación a la Federación de los Estados Unidos de Norte América; manifestando que por haber cambiado la situación política de la Provincia, pedirían instrucciones a su Gobierno” (page 111).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1, 1823—“Por estar ya completa la representación de todas las Provincias centroamericanas, la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centro América, hace la tercera declaración de emancipación, ratificando la independencia de las Provincias Unidas de Centro América” (page 112).  Lists the names of all the deputies of all the provinces.  Octubre 4, 1823—“La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente, nombra al general Manuel José Arce, (ausente) Presidente, al doctor José Cecilio del Valle y al Lic. Tomás O’Horán, en reemplazo de los dimitentes” (page 113).  Octubre 5, 1823—“La Asamblea Nacional por ausencia del Gral. Manuel José Arce y del Lic. José Cecilio del Valle, nombra para mientras duren dichas ausencias, a don José Santiago Milla y a don Francisco Barrundia...Octubre 10, 1823—La Asamblea...por la renuncia del ciudadano José Francisco Barrundia, nombra como miembro del Poder Ejecutivo Nacional al ciudadano Juan Vicente Villacorta” (page 114).  Octubre 27, 1823—“La Diputación Provincial de El Salvador se erige en Junta Gubernativa, y asume todas las facultades que como tal le corresponden, las cuales ejerció hasta la instalación del Congreso Constituyente del Estado” (page 115).

December

Bonilla 2000:  La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente “dictó las ‘Bases de la Constitución’ el 17 de diciembre de 1823” (page 52).

Herrera 2005:  “Las bases de la Constitución, publicadas por la Asamblea Nacional, el 27 de diciembre de 1823,…planteaban que la república se compondría de cinco Estados…, los cuales eran libres e independientes en su administración interior…No obstante, la Provincia de San Salvador se adelantó a los hechos.  Las autoridades liberales salvadoreñas…anexaron, en diciembre de 1823, el territorio de Sonsonate, a través de la intimidación armada y las negociaciones…(P)or otro lado, las autoridades liberales de San Salvador, sin esperar la carta magna federal y a partir de las bases de la Constitución, convocaron a elecciones para formar un congreso constituyente” (page 922).

1824

Figeac 1938:  “Después del interinato que ejerció don Juan Manuel Rodríguez, entre enero y septiembre de 1824, y del que hizo don Mariano Prado desde el 1º de octubre al 12 de diciembre del mismo año, ocupó la alta jefatura del Estado de El Salvador el ciudadano don Juan Vicente Villacorta, conforme a las elecciones constitucionales que para el caso se efectuaron” (page 76).

Herrera 2005:  “El territorio del Estado del Salvador, antes de su fundación en 1824, estaba dividido en dos provincias, que en términos administrativos eran independientes una de la otra:  la Provincia de San Salvador (convertida en intendencia en 1786) y la Alcaldía Mayor de Sonsonate…(D)ependieron, en lo político, judicial y económico…de la audiencia, del capitán general…y del monopolio de los comerciantes guatemaltecos.  Los comerciantes eran redes de familias, encabezadas por los Aycinena…La elite ‘blanca’ de la Intendencia de San Salvador, compuesta por criollos y peninsulares, ocupaba los oficios más importantes de la vida política local—ayuntamientos—, así como de la vida eclesiástica (vicarías, curatos)” (page 916).

Wortman 1982:  “While the federal government completed its organization, the states attempted to form their own governments…Salvador seized the indigo-producing regions of Santa Ana and Sonsonate, under the control of the [Guatemalan] Aycinena group after Mexican occupation, in 1824” (page 235).

March

Bonilla 2000:  “En San Salvador, los líderes aprovecharon las Bases para convocar a una Asamblea Constituyente estatal sin que la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente necesariamente lo hubiera decidido y hecho.  La Asamblea Constituyente del estado inició sus sesiones bajo la presidencia de José María Calderón, e 14 de marzo de 1824” (page 58).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 5—Se instaló el primer Congreso Constituyente del Estado del Salvador” (page 17).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 14, 1824—“Se instala solemnemente el Primer Congreso Constituyente del Estado de El Salvador” (page 121).  Names the members of the congress (page 122).

April

Herrera 2005:  “(L)os diputados del nuevo Estado decretaron, el 27 de abril de 1824, la erección de la silla episcopal” (page 922).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Juan Manuel Rodríguez (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Político del 22 de abril al 1o de octubre de 1824…El 22 de abril de 1824, la Asamblea Constituyente dio posesión de Jefe de Estado, al ciudadano Juan Manuel Rodríguez” (page 23).

May

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En mayo de 1824, la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente, decreta creando Alcaldías en los pueblos de menos de mil habitantes” (page 23). 

Herrera 2005:  “La conducta prematura de los salvadoreños era problemática, porque…solo la Constitución federal podía designar la forma de gobierno de las provincias.  En ese caso, los salvadoreños debieron haber esperado hasta el 22 de noviembre de 1824, fecha en la cual se decretó la Constitución federal.  No obstante, su antelación…llevó a la Asamblea Nacional a decretar, el 5 de mayo de 1824, que cada una de ellas eligiera su congreso constituyente y su jefe de Estado…El obispo ratificado fue José Matías Delgado, quien tomó posesión de su cargo el 5 de mayo de 1824.  Hasta ese momento, Delgado fungía como diputado presidente de la Asamblea Nacional, en representación de San Salvador” (page 922).

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 5—La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente decreta que tengan congresos los cinco Estados de la República…El Congreso del Salvador se había ya reunido en la ciudad del mismo nombre, desde principios de marzo, con 11 representantes” (page 19).

June

Bonilla 2000:  “La Constitución de 1924 contiene la descripción de los poderes del Estado.  El capítulo 4 describe el Congreso, que ejerce el Poder Legislativo, electo cada dos años…El capítulo 5, describe el Consejo Representativo, electo por tres años…El capítulo 6 describe el Poder Ejecutivo, que era ejercido por un Jefo Supremo del Estado, electo por cuatro años.  El suplente del Jefe presidía el Consejo Representativo” (page 63).  “Por la nueva Constitución se erigen en junio los departamentos de Sonsonate, San Salvador, San Vicente y San Miguel” (page 72).

Figeac 1938:  El Congreso Constituyente “emitió la Constitución Política del Estado de El Salvador, el día 12 de junio, la que fué jurada con inusitada solemnidad el 4 del mes siguiente. Conforme a las disposiciones constitucionales, el Partido de Sonsonate quedó desde entonces comprendido en la jurisdicción de El Salvador” (page 75).

Herrera 2005:  “El Congreso nombró un poder ejecutivo y, en junio de ese año, ya tenía lista la Constitución del nuevo Estado” (page 922).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 12—La Asamblea Constituyente del Estado del Salvador, divide en cuatro departamentos el territorio comprendido en la antigua demarcación de la provincia del mismo nombre y Alcaldía mayor de Zonzonate que, de hecho, quedó unida á aquel Estado, entre tanto se verificaba la división del territorio de la República según se previno en el artículo 7 de la Constitución federal.  Dichos departamentos divididos en 20 distritos ó partidos, conservaron la denominación de sus respectivas cabeceras que lo fueron, San Salvador, Zonzonate, San Vicente y San Miguel” (pages 19-20).

July

Marure 1895:  “Julio 4—Se promulgó y juró solemnemente la Constitución política del Estado del Salvador, decretada por su Asamblea Constituyente en 12 de junio anterior” (page 20).

September

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 14, 1824—“El Estado de El Salvador elige como Jefe Supremo al señor don Juan Vicente Villacorta y Vice Jefe a don Mariano Prado” (page 127).

Soto Gómez 2005:  “Cuando la Constitución de la República de 1824 se puso en vigencia, fueron convocadas las primeras elecciones para Presidente y Vice-presidente de El Salvador” (page 55).

Vidal 1970: Election for chief and vice chief of Province of El Salvador.  Gives name of successful candidates (page 154). 

October

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Mariano Prado gobernó…como Jefe Político:  1o de octubre al 13 de diciembre de 1824” (page 21).

November

Bonilla 2000:  La Asamblea “aprobó la Constitución Popular Representativa y Federal el 22 de noviembre de 1824” (page 52).

Ching 1997:  The 1824 constitution of the United Provinces of Central America “established popular elections as the method of transferring political power and separated the government into three branches, legislative, executive and judicial.  On the other hand, the charter limited mass participation in government by making all elections indirect, a tactic adapted from Spain’s Cádiz Constitution of 1812.  In indirect elections, voters cast their votes not for their political officials, but of ‘electores’ (delegates) who would then vote on their behalf.  The distance between the common voter and the candidates increased with the importance of the election…(I)n elections for such offices as President, Vice President and Representatives to the Federal Congress, the selection of electores occurred in three rounds” (page 49).

Llanes 1995:  The “Asamblea Nacional Constituyente…issued a constitution on 22 November 1824.  The constitution declared that the religion of the republic was Roman Catholicism and prohibited the public exercise of any other religion” (page 38).

Marure 1895:  El “Congreso terminó sus sesiones el 23 de noviembre del mismo año de 24, después de haber decretado la primera Constitución política de aquel ‘Estado’” (page 17).

White 1973:  “In November 1824 the Assembly renamed the state the Federal Republic of Central America and promulgated a federal constitution.  The five states were each to have their own legislatures and executives (‘heads of states’) while the Federation was to have a Congress and a President” (page 64).

Wortman 1982:  “In December 1824 Central America appeared to be unified by liberal regimes under Salvadoran hegemony.  But the unification was a mirage, more the reflection of a common position held by diverse families against rival towns and families than a feeling of national community.  All feared Guatemala, and few were willing to give up their power to the central government” (page 236).

December

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Juan Vicente Villacorta (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Supremo del 13 de diciembre de 1824 al 1o de noviembre de 1826…Fue el primer Gobernante electo por el pueblo” (page 25).

Marure 1895:  “Diciembre 13—Entra al ejercicio del Poder Ejecutivo, como primer Jefe del Estado del Salvador el señor Juan Vicente Villacorta” (page 25).

1825

Llanes 1995:  “The pope, in 1825, decreed illegitimate the acts of the Salvadorian legislature.  The same year a number of the local clergy who did not recognize Delgado as their bishop were expelled from El Salvador and went to reside in Guatemala” (page 40).

January

Marure 1895:  “Después de diez y nueve meses de trabajos, la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente cerró sus sesiones el 23 de enero de 1825” (page 10).  “Enero 30—Se instaló la primera Legislatura ordinaria del Estado del Salvador bajo la presidencia del señor José Antonio Ximénez” (page 26).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 30, 1825—“Se instala la primera Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador” (page 133).

March-April

Figeac 1938:  “Corriendo el mes de abril de 1825 y estando sentadas las bases constitucionales de la Federación Centroamericana, se convocó a los ciudadanos para que eligieran en los comicios públicos al presidente y vice-presidente de la nueva República...A las urnas electorales se presentaron los partidos liberal y conservador, postulando para presidente de la Federación a las personas de sus simpatías.  Por el partido liberal se lanzó la candidatura de don Manuel José Arce, y por el otro partido adversario, la del ciudadano José Cecilio del Valle; pero ni una ni otra obtuvieron mayoría absoluta de votos, por lo que fue preciso eligiera la Asamblea Nacional al presidente y vice-presidente de la nación centroamericana” (pages 78-79).  Describes the election and the aftermath.

Herrera 2005:  “Arce fue elegido como el primer presidente federal, el 21 de abril de 1824, y tomó posesión de su cargo el 29 de ese mismo mes” (pages 925-926).

Karnes 1976:  “The important task of electing the first president occupied the Central Americans early in 1825…A potential electoral vote of eighty-two had reached only seventy-nine because of complications in creating Guatemalan districts, and four other votes were nullified.  Valle led forty-one to thirty-four out of the seventy-five resulting.  Since the consitution required an absolute majority, the question then arose as to whether Valle’s forty-one should be based upon the authorized eighty-two votes or upon the actual seventy-nine cast” (page 56).  Following a “deal” made by Arce, “the congress announced that Valle lacked a majority, and the election was in its hands.  By a congressional vote of twenty-two to five Manuel José Arce thus became the first president of Central America” (page 57).

White 1973:  “(T)he sway of the Federal authorities, whose seat was first established at Guatemala City, was not peacefully accepted in the whole of Central America for more than a few months after the end of the Constituent Assembly and the election of the first President, the Salvadorean Arce, in April 1825.  Arce attempted to bring liberals and conservatives together and to impose strong central control on the states” (pages 64-65).

Woodward 1985:  “Central American Liberals…won, by the barest of margins and amid cries of fraud, the election of 1825.  They had controlled the government since July 1823, and even before the election they had abolished slavery and noble titles, limited the monopolies, enacted a generous immigration law, and adopted the federal Constitution of 1824.  Now, under the leadership of Manuel José Arce, they embarked on a bold revolutionary program which alarmed the Conservatives, who were led by Mariano Aycinena and José del Valle” (page 94).

Wortman 1982:  “Salvadoran liberal Manuel Arce…was elected president of the federation in March 1825 when Salvador and Nicaragua threatened secession if his conservative opponent were chosen” (pages 247-248).

April

Marure 1895:  “Abril 24—Tomó posesión con el carácter de primer Obispo electo del Salvador, el Presbítero Dr. Matías Delgado, y comenzó en tal concepto á gobernar la nueva Diócesis.  Este paso y los demás que ya se habían dado sobre este asunto…dieron origen al cisma que por algún tiempo tuvo dividido al clero de Centro-América y contribuyó á encender la guerra civil que despedazó á los Estados del Salvador y Guatemala durante los años de 27, 28 y 29” (page 28).

1826

Bonilla 2000a: “Al inaugurar su gobierno Manuel José Arce fue saboteado por sus opositores estallando, en 1826, una cruenta guerra civil que ocuparía, prácticamente, 74 años del siglo XIX” (page 81).

Woodward 1985:  “Recognizing the impossibility of immediate transformation of the economy and society, and facing the reality of considerable Conservative strength, moderates led by President Arce himself soon defected from the Liberals.  This resulted in Conservative control of the federal and Guatemalan government in 1826, but it also sparked a bloody civil war.  The Liberals found a leader in Francisco Morazán…El Salvador was near rebellion over the efforts of Ramón Casaus y Torres, the Conservative Archbishop of Guatemala, to block appointment of Liberal José Matías Delgado as Bishop of El Salvador” (page 95).

Wortman 1982:  “Most of Central America maintained a tenuous peace from 1823 until late 1826.  Except for Nicaragua, no area was strong enough to challenge the stability imposed by the alliance of liberals in Salvador, Tegucigalpa, and Guatemala…This stability was shattered in 1826 when the central government tried to regain its prerogatives.  The provinces rebelled, and for two years Central America fought, destroying the land, razing farms, and interrupting commerce…As regional families fought over disputes the crown had mediated, heretofore peaceful castes and classes, who had recognized Creole and Spanish authority, resorted to violence and rebellion to improve their position” (page 246).

October

Marure 1895:  “Octubre 10—El Presidente Arce, de propia autoridad, convoca para la villa de Cojutepeque, en el Estado del Salvador, un Congreso Nacional extraordinario, plenamente autorizado para restablecer el orden constitucional en la República” (page 36).

November

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Mariano Prado…gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  1o noviembre de 1826 al 30 enero de 1829” (page 21).  “El 1o de noviembre de 1826, el Presidente Villacorta renunció su alto cargo, entregando el Mando Supremo al Vice-Jefe de entonces don Mariano Prado” (page 25).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 1826—“(E)l Jefe Supremo don Juan Vicente Villacorta renuncia, haciéndose cargo del mando supremo el Vice Jefe don Mariano Prado” (page 159).

Soto Gómez 2005:  “Villacorta dejó su cargo al Vice Jefe Mariano Prado, por motivos de salud, el 1 de noviembre de 1826 y pocos meses después falleció…Como don Juan Vicente Villacorta fue electo para un período de cuatro años y sólo ejerció dos, don Mariano Prado completó el período constitucional y llegó en el mando hasta 1828” (page 56).

Taplin 1972:   Mariano Prado assumes chief authority for El Salvador following the resignation of Villacorta on November 1, 1826 (page 96).

December

Marure 1895:  El “decreto que expidió el Gobierno del Salvador en 6 de diciembre del mismo año [invitó] á los Diputados federales para que concurriesen á la villa de Ahuachapán.  Así quedó eludida la reunión de Cojutepeque” (page 36).

1827

Bonilla 2000a:  “1827.  El ejército salvadoreño invade Guatemala para derrocar a Manuel José Arce; los invasores fueron derrotados.  El Salvador desconoce al gobierno federal.  Sonsonate y Santa Ana se separan de El Salvador, reconociendo únicamente al gobierno federal hasta la conclusión de la guerra en 1829” (page 110).

March

Figeac 1938:  “En marzo de 1827, en el mismo mes en que los conservadores Aycinena y Córdova tomaron el mando del Estado guatemalteco, invadió Trigueros [de orden del mandatario de El Salvador] el territorio de Guatemala” (page 81).

Herrera 2005:  “De hecho, Mariano Aycinena había asumido la jefatura del Estado de Guatemala, el 1 de marzo de 1827, y con él los ‘serviles’ se consolidaron en el poder estatal y federal” (page 926).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 23—El ejército salvadoreño que se había aproximado á la capital de Guatemala, con intento, según decían sus jefes, de reponer á las autoridades disueltas en Quezaltenango, sufre en la inmediaciones de la hacienda de ‘Arrazola’ una completa derrota, causada por las tropas de la guarnición que mandaba en personal el Presidente de la República señor Manuel José Arce” (page 40).

Woodward 1985:  “By 1827 bitter fighting raged around the Guatemalan-Salvadoran border” (page 95).

May

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 18—El Presidente de la República, á la cabeza de más de 2,000 hombres de toda arma, ataca la plaza de San Salvador…, pero después de cinco horas de combate es rechazado con gran pérdida y obligado á evacuar todo el territorio salvadoreño” (page 42).

White 1973:  Arce “only succeeded in becoming closely aligned with the Guatemalan conservatives and leading them in a civil war against the liberals, who were concentrated in El Salvador:  he commanded the first, unsuccessful, attack on San Salvador in May 1827” (page 65).

December

Marure 1895:  “Diciembre 17—En las calles de la ciudad de Santa Ana, las fuerzas salvadoreñas…y las de Guatemala…se dan un sangriento combate que se terminó por una capitulación en virtud de la cual ambas fuerzas debían evacuar la plaza al siguiente día…Con este combate finalizó la segunda campaña entre salvadoreños y guatemaltecos” (page 44).

1828

Bonilla 2000a: “1828.  El gobierno federal ocupa San Salvador…Francisco Morazán apoya al gobierno salvadoreño…y derrota a las fuerzas federales” (page 110).

March

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 1o—Batalla de Chalchuapa.  El ejército de Guatemala…obtiene…una victoria completa sobre el ejército salvadoreño…Con esta acción…se abrió la tercera campaña entre Guatemala y El Salvador” (pages 45-46).

September

Marure 1895:  “Septiembre 20—Contrasitiados, en el pueblo de Mejicanos, los restos del ejército federal que había asediado la plaza de San Salvador por el espacio de ocho meses, tienen que rendirse por capitulación” (page 47).

October

Figeac 1938:  “El 23 de octubre hizo su ingreso a la capital salvadoreña el general [Francisco] Morazán y desde entonces se concretó a preparar una expedición contra el gobierno guatemalteco, pareciendo que todo arreglo de paz fuera menospreciado por este auxiliar de El Salvador y por don Mariano Prado” (page 92).

November

Bonilla 2000a: “Mariano Prado había culminado su periodo de Gobierno y no daba señales de convocar a elecciones.  Cuando las convocó, el 8 de noviembre de 1828, y se dio cuenta que José Antonio Cañas tenía mas votos las suspendió” (page 103).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 8, 1828—“El Vice Jefe del Estado de El Salvador ciudadano Mariano Prado convoca a elecciones del Jefe Supremo y Vice Jefe del Estado de El Salvador y de representantes a la Asamblea Legislativa” (page 191).

December

Leistenschneider 1980:  Antonio José Cañas “fué a elecciones y alcanzó la mayoría de votos para Presidente de El Salvador, pero sus votos fueron anulados por el Gobierno de entonces don Mariano Prado” (page 55).

Monterey 1977:  Diciembre 4, 1828—“El Vice Jefe Mariano Prado al saber que no tenía votos en las elecciones de las Autoridades Supremas que se estaban practicando y que el que obtenía la mayoría era el Coronel Antonio José Cañas, ordena la suspensión de las elecciones...Diciembre 5, 1828—La opinión pública manifestada en varias actas municipales y secundada por la prensa, piden que se cumpla el artículo 46 de la Constitución del Estado de El Salvador, el cual previene que el Jefe Supremo del Estado sólo puede ser electo por cuatro años.  La dictadura del Vice Jefe Prado, parecía ya demasiado larga...Diciembre 30, 1828—La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador declaró que el Vice Jefe en ejercicio del Mando Supremo, ciudadano Mariano Prado, ya había concluído su período desde el veinte y cuatro de septiembre y dió las providencias convenientes para las nuevas elecciones” (page 192).

1829

Figeac 1938:  “Por estos días se supo que en la Antigua se habían pronunciado algunos ciudadanos a favor de la causa que sustentaba Morazán, que no era otra entonces que la de deponer a las autoridades conservadoras establecidas en Guatemala.  Aprovechando este incidente, se operó la invasión del territorio guatemalteco por las fuerzas salvadoreñas...(A)uxilió Morazán a los rebeldes antigüeños, logrando restablecer el gobierno del Estado, conforme ellos lo deseaban” (page 93).

January

Bonilla 2000a:  “En las elecciones del 22 de enero de 1829, José María Cornejo…resultó electo Jefe de Estado; y como Vicejefe Nicolás Espinoza…[Prado] fue derrotado en las elecciones” (page 104).

Figeac 1938:  “En el Estado de El Salvador se habían verificado elecciones de miembros del Poder Ejecutivo, por lo que desde el mes de enero venía desempeñando la jefatura el ciudadano don José María Cornejo, de acuerdo con la voluntad del pueblo salvadoreño” (page 95).  “Receloso e intransigente el jefe del Estado de El Salvador, señor Cornejo, hostilizó por todos los medios posibles a los liberales que estaban bajo su jurisdicción” (page 96).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don José María Cornejo (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Supremo del 30 enero de 1829 al 16 de febrero de 1830” (page 27).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1829—“El Congreso Legislativo del Estado de El Salvador declara nulas las elecciones de Jefe Supremo del Estado recaída en el ciudadano Coronel Antonio José Cañas, por no ser el Poder Ejecutivo el competente para convocar elecciones.  El Congreso…convoca a elecciones de Jefe Supremo y Vice Jefe del Estado…Enero 22, 1829—En El Salvador fueron electos Jefe Supremo del Estado don José María Cornejo y Vice Jefe el Lic. Don Nicolás Espinoza…Enero 30, 1829—Toma posesión del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador el ciudadano José María Cornejo” (page 195).

Taplin 1972: Prado resigns as chief of El Salvador, January 22, 1829 (page 96).

Vidal 1970: “En 1829 había sido electo Jefe del Estado de El Salvador don José María Cornejo” (page 193).

April

Figeac 1938:  “El 13 de abril entró victorioso el general Morazán a la capital guatemalteca” (page 94).  “La ocupación de la ciudad de Guatemala por las tropas salvadoreñas que comandaba el general Francisco Morazán, propició un cambio radical en la política centroamericana: fue convocada la Asamblea Constituyente disuelta en 1826, con el objeto de que se encargara de reorganizar la Federación sobre bases constitucionales” (page 95).

Llanes 1995:  “The Conservative party had a strong alliance in the conservative part of the clergy, especially in the person of Archbishop Casaus.  The tension ran so high between Liberals and Conservatives that in 1829, after the end of two years of civil war when Liberals gained control of the federation, Archbishop Casaus and 429 friars were accused of treason and expelled from Central America” (pages 40-41).

Woodward 1985:  “Following their victory in 1929, the Liberals dealt vindictively with their enemies.  They imprisoned or exiled the Conservative leaders and granted the state governments extraordinary powers to deal with all who opposed the Liberal regimes” (page 95).

June

Figeac 1938:  “(P)ara que el poder público quedara completamente bajo el control del partido liberal, la Representación Nacional emitió un decreto del 25 de junio de 1829, nombrando presidente interino de la Federación al patriota don José Francisco Barrundia” (page 95).

Monterey 1977:  Junio 12, 1829—“El Lic. Nicolás Espinoza renuncia del empleo de Vice Jefe del Estado” (page 202).

August

Ingersoll 1972:  “Agitation by the states over proportional representation in the Federal Congress had led the newly constituted body, in a decree of August 2, 1829, to set up representation as follows:  Guatemala—17 deputies, El Salvador—9, Honduras and Nicaragua—6 each, and Costa Rica—2.  Since this was reform in name only, and did not solve the problem of the overwhelming power given to Guatemala, agitation for constitutional reform continued to grow, again led by El Salvador” (page 16).

Monterey 1977:  Agosto 18, 1829—“El Congreso Federal decreta convocando a las elecciones de todos los Diputados al Congreso, de todos los miembros del Senado, [y] del Presidente y Vice Presidente de la República” (page 205).  Agosto 24, 1829—“La Asamblea Legislativa declara electo popularmente al ciudadano Lic. Damián Villacorta como Vice-Jefe del Estado de El Salvador; esta elección se efectuó por haber renunciado el Vice-Jefe Lic. Nicolás Espinoza” (page 206).

1830

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 16 de febrero de 1830 don José María Cornejo entrega el Mando Supremo al Licenciado don José Damián Villacorta” (page 27).  “Licenciado José Damián Villacorta (salvadoreño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe del 16 de febrero al 4 de diciembre de 1830” (page 29).

March

Figeac 1938:  “El 27 de marzo de 1830 convocó el Congreso federal a los pueblos de la República, para que procedieran a elegir al presidente y vice-presidente de la Federación; y, en esa virtud, salieron designados para el desempeño de tales magistraturas, el general don Francisco Morazán y el patriota salvadoreño don Mariano Prado, quienes comenzaron a ejercer sus funciones desde el 16 de septiembre” (page 97).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(H)ubo un Decreto Legislativo, en marzo de 1830, ordenando la extinción de las órdenes religiosas en el Estado de El Salvador…Declaró pertenecer al Estado todos los conventos” (page 29).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 1o—Se decretó en el Estado de El Salvador la extinción de los conventos de regulares” (page 59).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 27, 1830—“Se instala en la ciudad de Guatemala el Congreso Federal y convoca a los pueblos para elegir al Presidente y Vice-Presidente Federal” (page 212)

June

Monterey 1977:  June 1830—“El Congreso Federal, por no haber mayoría absoluta de votos, declara electo Presidente de Centro América al ciudadano General Francisco Morazán y como Vicepresidente al ciudadano Mariano Prado” (page 121).

September

Ingersoll 1972:  “As one of his first acts after assuming the presidency in September, 1830, General Morazán began pressure to move the federal capital from its seat in Guatemala City to San Salvador.  He felt uncomfortable in the hostile atmosphere in Guatemala City and regarded the area as more exposed to Conservative retaliation from Mexico…Unfortunately, however, the Salvadorean assembly did not agree with the president.  In addition to both localist and conservative sentiment in the government, the legislators feared potential political strains arising from the federal capital being in their state capital and, even more, feared the economic cost to El Salvador of such a dual situation” (page 12).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 16, 1830—“El General Francisco Morazán, toma posesión de la Presidencia de la República de Centro América, en la ciudad de Guatemala” (page 213).

December

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don José María Cornejo (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo del 4 de diciembre de 1830 al 3 de abril de 1832…El 4 de diciembre de 1830 el Vice-Jefe del Estado de El Salvador don José Damián Villacorta entrega el Mando Supremo a don José María Cornejo” (page 27).

1831

Bonilla 2000a:  “1831.  Se instala en San Salvador la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado.  Insurrección en San Salvador contra las autoridades del Estado” (page 110).

Karnes 1976:  “In 1831 a well coordinated plan was initiated to annihilate the Liberal party.  From his asylum in Mexico former President Arce…plotted with the new chief of El Salvador, José María Cornejo, against the federal authorities” (page 76).

White 1973:  In 1831 “José María Cornejo, who had been elected in 1829, turned toward the conservatives; this change may well have been due to fear of Guatemala hegemony, which at this time, exceptionally, had a liberal guise” (page 70).

February

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 7—A la una de la tarde hubo un gran terremoto en El Salvador que causó notables estragos en la capital del Estado y muchas de las poblaciones situadas sobre la costa del Sur” (page 63).  “Febrero 16—Se concede al pueblo de Chalatenango, en el Estado de El Salvador, el título de ‘villa’” (page 64).

December

Ingersoll 1972:  “President Morazán, in a decree of December 20, 1831, designated San Salvador as the federal capital and began his journey to the new seat of government.  The government of El Salvador announced he would not be permitted to enter the state.  In reply, Morazán [issued] a proclamation stating his motives for moving the capital to San Salvador” (page 12).  These included the fact that “the federal legislature was dominated by Guatemalans, both because of proportional representation and because the ‘suplentes’ (substitutes, when the elected legislator could not arrive at the seat of government) of the other states, simply because of convenience and proximity, were Guatemalans.  Simply, moving the capital to San Salvador would be a major step in trimming Guatemala’s excessive power.  He directed his ideas at El Salvador, because the tiny state had been the most vocal in complaining of Guatemalan abuses and in refusing to accede to federal decrees” (page 13).

Monterey 1977:  Diciembre 20, 1831—“El Presidente Federal General Francisco Morazán decreta el traslado de las autoridades federales al Estado de El Salvador” (page 216).

Wortman 1982:  “Morazán and [Guatemalan governor] Gálvez organized a federal government, called a federal congress composed almost exclusively of Guatemalans, and created a federal district of the city of Salvador, without the approval of the ruling Salvadorans” (page  261).

1832

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1832 uprisings throughout the Federated States of El Salvador and Guatemala inaugurated a surge in popular revolts and political instability that continued for a half century.  These popular mobilizations began when El Salvador’s head of state, Mariano Prado, tried to enforce a series of unpopular laws…Riots in the mostly Indian neighborhoods of San Salvador ultimately led to larger revolts and conspiracies” (pages 105-106).

Llanes 1995:  “’Criollos’ used Indian and ‘ladino’ armies in the continuous state of war in the region, and used each against the other when facing insurrection by either group.  In 1832, ‘ladinos’ in El Salvador protested new taxes, and Indian armies were used to put down the insurrection.  In reaction, the ‘ladino’ population of San Miguel attacked the Indian garrison and killed most of the Indian soldiers.  Indians reacted with violence against these kinds of abuses” (page 63).

Taplin 1972:  El Salvador secedes from the federation on January 7, 1832.  Morazán enters San Salvador, deposes Cornejo on April 3, 1832, and sends him to Guatemala under guard.  Prado (who had been elected vice-president of the federation on March 27, 1830) resigns his office and reassumes the duties of chief executive of El Salvador (pages 96-97).

Tilley 2005:  “In 1832, popular revolts against the new federal taxes rocked a number of towns in the region including Zacatecoluca and Izalco” (page 115).

January

Ingersoll 1972:  “On January 7, 1832, [El Salvador] seceded from the federation and announced the federal pact was dissolved until all the states could meet to consider mutual security and reforms to the constitution.  The federal Congress promptly declared El Salvador in ‘a state of rebellion’” (page 13). 

Karnes 1976:  “In the face of threatened invasion by Morazán, Cornejo ordered him to leave El Salvador, and the state seceded from the federal union” (pages 76-77).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En enero de 1832 el General Francisco Morazán con su ejército ocupó la ciudad de Santa Ana, por ese motivo la Asamblea Legislativa decreta declarando suspenso el pacto nacional” (pages 27-28).

Marure 1895:  “Enero 7—La Asamblea del Estado de El Salvador declara suspenso el pacto federativo y desconoce á las autoridades de la República.  Consiguiente con este acuerdo, el Jefe de aquel Estado hace regresar de Santa Ana al Presidente de la República, que el 29 del mismo mes, y acompañado de sus Ministros, había salido de Guatemala para trasladarse á la capital de El Salvador” (pages 66-67).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 2, 1832—“Proclama del Presidente Federal, General Francisco Morazán,…en la cual hace saber que la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, le ordena suspender su marcha hacia la ciudad de San Salvador, amenazándolo con expulsarlo si llega.  El viaje tenía por objeto trasladar a San Salvador la Capital Federal…Enero 7, 1832—La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador emite decreto declarando suspenso el pacto nacional; desconoce las autoridades federales y assume la soberanía” (page 218).

February

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1832—“En la ciudad de Guatemala el Congreso Federal declara ilegítimas las autoridades del Estado de El Salvador” (page 218).

March

Bonilla 2000a:  “Morazán tomó San Salvador en medio de una gran batalla, el 28 de marzo de 1832.  Inmediatamente colocó a Prado como Jefe de Estado y regresó a Guatemala” (page 105).

Figeac 1938:  “Luego que el general Morazán desalojó del poder al impopular don José María Cornejo, ordenó la emisión de un decreto convocando a elecciones a los salvadoreños, para cubrir la vacante” (page 99).

Ingersoll 1972:  “President Morazán raised an army of Honduran, Nicaraguan, and Guatemalan troops and, after a small resistance, entered San Salvador on March 28” (page 14).

Karnes 1976:  “By March, 1832, the Federalists had everywhere won.  Arce was defeated and driven back to Mexico…Morazán’s army took San Salvador and brought the secession to a close” (page 77).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El el mes de marzo de 1832 hubo sublevación en Chalatenango contra el Jefe Supremo don José María Cornejo y en favor del Gobierno Federal” (page 28).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 28—El Presidente de la República, General F. Morazán, ocupa á viva fuerza la plaza de San Salvador; hace, en seguida, poner presas á todas las personas que ejercían los Supremos Poderes de aquel Estado y las remite escoltadas á Guatemala para que allí fuesen juzgadas” (page 69).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 29, 1832—“El General Francisco Morazán ataca la plaza de San Salvador…Fueron capturados el Jefe Supremo del Estado, don José María Cornejo, sus Ministros de Estado, [y] la mayoría de los Miembros de la Asamblea Legislativa…El General Morazán declara que asume provisionalmente el Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, y convoca a elecciones de Autoridades Supremas del Estado” (page 220).

April

Figeac 1938:  “Don Mariano Prado salió victorioso en las urnas electorales, como jefe del Estado, y don Joaquín San Martín como vice-jefe” (page 99).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 3 de abril de 1832 el General Francisco Morazán depone al Jefe Supremo don José María Cornejo; y envía escoltados presos para Guatemala a don José María Cornejo, al Prócer Antonio José Cañas, Ministros de Estado, la mayoría de los miembros de la Asamblea Legislativa, los Magistrados de la Corte Suprema de Justicia y como sesenta personas más…Permanecieron cerca de un año en prisión.  Don José María Cornejo fue el Primer Jefe de Estado depuesto por el General Morazán.  El 3 de abril de 1832 asumió el Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador el General Francisco Morazán” (page 28).  “General Francisco Morazán (hondureño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  3 Abril al 13 de Mayo de 1832” (page 47).

Marure 1895:  Morazán “expidió un decreto con fecha 3 de abril siguiente, declarando que reasumía en su persona el Gobierno del Estado entre tanto se reorganizaban sus autoridades constitucionales” (page 69).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 3, 1832—“Fueron electos popularmente Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador don Mariano Prado y Vice-Jefe el Coronel don Joaquín San Martín” (page 220).

Soto Gómez 2005:  “Morazán fue Presidente del 3 de abril al 13 de mayo de 1832, cuando derrocó a don José María Cornejo, a quien mandó encadenado junto a su gabinete de gobierno a Guatemala.  40 días después entregó el poder al Coronel Joaquín San Martín” (page 61).

May

Karnes 1976:  “In May of 1832 complete religious freedom was declared by congress and the states…These reforms had but slight theological importance.  The Liberals themselves were primarily Catholics and not fighting for the right to introduce other denominations.  Their purpose was simply to weaken the secular position of the church in Central American affairs” (pages 72-73).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Coronel Joaquín de San Martín (hondureño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe:  13 de Mayo al 25 de Julio de 1832” (page 31).

Llanes 1995:  “The federal congress adopted a policy of religious toleration on 2 May 1832, proclaiming that all the inhabitants of the republic were free to worship God according to their conscience and were protected by the federal government in the eexercise of such freedom.  This law had no real effect upon the people since no other religious expression apart from Catholicism existed in the Central American republic” (page 39).

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 2—El Congreso federal de Centro-América decreta la ‘Tolerancia de cultos,’ declarando que todos los habitantes de la República son libres para adorar á Dios según su conciencia” (page 70).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 13, 1832—“En la ciudad de San Salvador se instala la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado…La Asamblea declara popularmente electos, como Jefe Supremo a don Mariano Prado y como Vice-Jefe al Coronel Joaquín San Martín” (page 221).

July

Domínguez Sosa 2007:  “Durante la administración de Prado, la anarquía se agudiza.  La insurrección cunde por todos los rumbos del solar cuscatleco.  Los factores principales de las sediciones, fueron el fanatismo popular, los empréstitos forzosos y los nuevos impuestos decretados por el Gobierno para aliviar la miseria fiscal. También influye en esto los reclutamientos de tropa” (pages 115-116).

Figeac 1938:  “El señor Prado tuvo que renunciar la vice-presidencia de la Federación, para poder aceptar y protestar su nuevo cargo; su renuncia le fue admitida por el Congreso federal y ya libre de tal compromiso, principió a ejercer sus elevadas funciones en julio de 1832, después de dos meses de interinato del vice-jefe San Martín” (page 99).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Mariano Prado (nicaragüense) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  25 de julio de 1832 al 9 de febrero de 1833” (page 21).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 25, 1832—“El ciudadano don Mariano Prado toma posesión del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, el cual había asumido el veinte y nueve de marzo el General Francisco Morazán” (page 221).

August

Figeac 1938:  “(L)a Asamblea del Estado emitió el decreto de 21 de agosto, mandando establecer una contribución anual, directa y general, pagadera sobre la propiedad y empleos de los habitantes del país, sin exceptuar a los súbditos extranjeros” (page 100).

White 1973:  “Another cause of discontent at the time was that in 1832 the state government had introduced new taxes in order to supplement the income it received, most of which had come, until then, from the liquor monopoly.  The treasury had been exhausted in part by a new war against the Federal government” (page 73).

October

Browning 1971:  “(T)he Nonualco Indians, having retained a large degree of tribal unity, saw the turbulent times as their hour of deliverance and sought to re-establish their own independent homeland that had been so persistently intruded upon over the past three centuries.  Between October 1832 and January 1833, they rose against the Government under their leader, Anastasio Aquino, proclaimed their political independence, and won control over a wide area between San Vicente and Zacatecoluca before being subdued by force” (page 142).

Figeac 1938:  “La ola de la indignación popular se fue inflamando poco a poco y en la noche del 24 de octubre se estrelló con pavoroso estrépito en las rocas del poder público.  Esa noche se levantó el pueblo sansalvadoreño en abierta pugna contra las autoridades gubernativas, y al jefe Prado no le quedó otro recurso...que trasladar su gobierno a Cojutepeque” (page 100).

Marure 1895:  “Octubre 24—Estalló en San Salvador una sublevación contra el Jefe del Estado señor Mariano Prado.  La exacción de una contribución directa que había decretado la Legislatura en 21 de agosto del mismo año, fue el motivo ostensible del levantamiento” (page 73).

November

Llanes 1995:  Matías “Delgado died 12 November 1832, and with him died a Liberal movement within the Catholic church” (page 40).  “After his death the Salvadorian church was headed by the Conservative wing of the church and became conservative in its whole” (page 41).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 1832—“Sublevación de los Izalcos, quienes atacan Sonsonate y la saquean…Sublevación de San Vicente y Santiago Nonualco…En San Miguel ocurren motines y sublevaciones contra el Gobierno del Jefe Supremo del Estado, don Mariano Prado” (page 226).

White 1973:  “Insurrections occurred in October and November in several towns, including the capital.  These probably involved mainly ‘ladinos,’ but Indian troops were used to put them down.  This forced recruitment of Indians for the army, to fight battles in which they had no interest, was another of the main grievances which led to the uprising of the Nonualcos” (page 73).

December

Figeac 1938:  “(E)l gobierno de Prado retornó a San Salvador el 10 de diciembre” (page 100).

White 1973:  “At the end of December 1832 a force of just over a hundred Indians from Santiago Nonualco and San Juan Nonualco formed the garrison maintained by the government in the city of San Miguel, which was hostile, having been the scene of one of the November insurrections” (page 73).

1833

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “A new uprising in San Salvador forced Chief of State Prado out of office. As a result of these revolts, the National Assemby eliminated the hated taxes.  The new chief of state, Joaquín San Martín, then decreed an amnesty, but more than opposition to new taxes was at stake” (page 106).

Taplin 1972: Joaquin San Martin y Ulloa assumes office when Prado resigns February 9, 1833; he is elected to office July 1, 1833 (page 97).

January

McElhinny 2006:  “Indigo, the first Salvadoran export crop, and the indigenous forced labor that it required were the ingredients of the first major agrarian revolt in January 1833…Accumulated grievances combined to spur Anastacio Aquino to lead a largely indigenous army of about 2,000 Nonualcos on a brief campaign that resulted in the sacking of the provincial capital of San Vicente.  Independence and the ensuing regional wars eliminated what few protections that indigenous people had under Spanish rule.  Finance of regional wars forced a restoration of tribute on indigenous communities.  Communal resources continued to be confiscated and indigenous conscripts were forced to defend state property from frequent ladino tax revolts” (page 139).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1833—“Insurrección de los pueblos indígenas, Santiago y San Juan Nonualco, acaudillados por el indio Anastasio Aquino” (page 229).

Tilley 2005:  “Ethnopolitical tensions were…already explosive when, in January of 1833, a local hacienda owner locked Aquino’s brother in the hacienda’s stocks.  Aquino and some friends attacked the hacienda to free him, and the incident catalyzed a mass uprising” (page 115).

White 1973:  “Tension gradually rose between the Indians of the [San Miguel] garrison and the ‘ladino’ population of the city, and culminated in an organized attack on the Indians on 3 and 4 January 1833, and the death of most of the Indians.  The rebellion of Anastasio Aquino began in Santiago Nonualco soon after news of this event must have reached there” (page 73).  Describes the rebellion.

February

Bonilla 2000a:  “La imposición de Mariano Prado quebró la política pluralista participativa que había mantenido El Salvador…(P)ronto Prado tuvo que dejar el poder, presionado por una insurrección provocada por los constantes impuestos que demandaba la guerra.  El vicejefe, Joaquín de San Martín, tuvo que asumir el poder en un momento muy delicado, y la política salvadoreña comenzó a ser dominada por las facciones que pronto fueron imponiendo la anarquía” (page 106). 

El Salvador: background to the crisis 1982:  “(T)he Salvadoran landholding elite, now unrestrained by the Spanish crown, felt free to seize Indian lands…In response, the first major opposition to the landed gentry arose in 1833, during the Indian rebellion led by Anastasio Aquino.  Aquino’s month-long rebellion was a fight for social justice in which poor ‘ladinos’ (non-Indians)  joined with Indians in what was then referred to as the ‘Army of Liberation’ to fight against rich ‘ladinos’ and ‘criollos’” (page 12).

Ingersoll 1972:  “At the same time the whites were starting another of their internecine quarrels, a widespread, brutal, and terrifying Indian revolt began in the Indian towns of Santiago Nonualco, Izalco, and Nahuizalco, led by the Indian Messiah, Anastacio Aquino, who proclaimed race war and war against the economic burdens borne by the Indians of El Salvador.  After much bloodshed, San Martín was able to crush the Indian revolt, execute Aquino, and restore some order to El Salvador” (page 15).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “A much larger uprising began in La Paz in February 1833 when Indian hacienda workers rebelled…The leader of this revolt [was] Anastasio Aquino” (page 106).  “Indian opposition to the legitimacy of white and Ladino political and military authority was key to their mobilization…The movement was defeated on February 14…This defeat was followed by harsh measures against the local population, including massive executions” (page 107).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 9 de febrero de 1833, [Mariano Prado] fue depuesto por un motín cuando el país se convulsionaba en una anarquía práctica.  Don Mariano Prado entregó el Mando Supremo al Vice-Jefe, Coronel Joaquín San Martín” (page 22).  “Coronel Joaquín de San Martín gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  9 Febrero de 1833 al 23 de Junio de 1834…El 13 de febrero de 1833, el Vice-Jefe San Martín, decreta concediendo indulto a los indios rebeldes nonualcos” (page 31).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1833—“El indio Anastasio Aquino derrota al Comandante de San Vicente…Febrero 5, 1833—El indio Anastasio Aquino toma y saquea la ciudad de Zacatecoluca” (page 231).  Febrero 8, 1833—“La Asamblea Legislativa acordó, en vista del estado anárquico del país en sus nueve meses de mando, excitar al Jefe Supremo del Estado, don Mariano Prado, para que deposite el Mando Supremo en el Vice-Jefe don Joaquín San Martín” (page 231).  Febrero 15, 1833—“El indio Aquino…entra a la abandonada ciudad de San Vicente” (pages 232-233).  Febrero 28, 1833—“El Coronel Juan José López ataca en Santiago Nonualco al indio Aquino, derrotándolo” (page 233).

March

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En marzo de 1833, el General Francisco Morazán, se une a las fuerzas revolucionarias para derrocar el Gobierno de San Martín” (page 31).

April

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En abril 6 de 1833 se firmó un Convenio entre San Martín y Morazán” (page 31).

May

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 10, 1833—“El Vice Jefe del Estado de El Salvador, don Joaquín San Martín, convoca a elecciones de Autoridades Supremas del Estado” (page 236).

June

Monterey 1977:  Junio 1833—“Se efectúan en el Estado de El Salvador las elecciones de Autoridades Supremas” (page 237).  Junio 21, 1833—“El Congreso Federal reunido en Guatemala, al tener conocimiento de que el Vice-Jefe don Joaquín San Martín había tenido mayoría de votos en las elecciones de Jefe Supremo de El Salvador, decreta, declarando inconstitucional la convocatoria a elecciones de Autoridades Supremas de El Salvador.  El Senado Federal negó su sanción a ese decreto” (page 237).

July

Figeac 1938:  El “Congreso del Estado se ocupó efectivamente de reorganizar los autoridades salvadoreñas sólo que en lugar de satisfacer la finalidad que se perseguía en los arreglos celebrados entre San Martín y Morazán, lo que hizo fue reafirmar como jefe de El Salvador al mismo San Martín, encargándole la vice-jefatura a don Lorenzo González, según decreto Legislativo de 1º de julio.  Esta decisión fue anulada por el Congreso Federal y el mismo Morazán desconoció esa situación creada por el ambicioso don Joaquín San Martín en un manifiesto” (page 109).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 1o de julio de 1833 el Congreso del Estado organizó a las autoridades Salvadoreñas:  como Jefe de Estado a San Martín y como Vice-Jefe a don Lorenzo González; esta decisión fue anulada por el Congreso Federal” (page 31).

Marure 1895:  “Julio 24—Anastasio Aquino, que había dado principio á la guerra de castas en el Estado de El Salvador, sublevando á los aborígenes de Santiago Nonualco, de donde era natural, es pasado por las armas en la ciudad de San Vicente.  Con la muerte de este cabecilla…quedó enteramente sofocada la temida insurreción de Nonualco” (page 78).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 1, 1833—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, declara popularmente electo Jefe Supremo del Estado a don Joaquín San Martín, y como Vice-Jefe a don Lorenzo González…Julio 24, 1833—Fué fusilado en la ciudad de San Vicente el indio Anastasio Aquino” (page 238).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 14, 1833—“Decreto del Vice Presidente Federal, José Gregorio Salazar, señalando la ciudad de Sonsonate para la residencia del Gobierno de las Autoridades Federales, y con el objeto de arrojar del Poder al Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, don Joaquín San Martín” (page 241).

1834

Karnes 1976:  “The numerous quarrels between states and national government served often to obscure an important factor that must be re-emphasized.  That was the old fear of Guatemala…Demands grew for the creation of a federal district outside of Guatemala; in 1834 these were acceded to by moving the administration to Sonsonate and later to San Salvador, both in the especially jealous state of El Salvador.  Coincidental with this shift were proposals to alter the constitution with the smaller states seeking, among other things, equal representation in the congress” (page 77).

January

Bonilla 2000a:  “1834.  En enero, la capital de la Federación se instala en Sonsonate” (page 112).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1834—“El Congreso Federal, al verificar el escrutinio, declara electo al ciudadano Licenciado José Cecilio del Valle, como Presidente Federal” (page 243).

February

Figeac 1938:  Morazán “fue autorizado por el Congreso de la República para trasladar la sede del gobierno de la República a Sonsonate, medida que fue cumplimentada el 12 de febrero de 1834, con la preconcebida idea de pacificar a los salvadoreños” (page 109).

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 5—Las Supremas autoridades nacionales, que desde su instalación habían residido en Guatemala, verifican su traslación á la ciudad de Zonzonate en el Estado de El Salvador…Poco tiempo permanecieron en su nueva residencia, la que abandonaron por el mes de junio del mismo año para establecerse definitivamente en la capital de El Salvador, que lo fue entonces de toda la República” (page 79).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 2, 1834—“Muere en la ciudad de Guatemala el Lic. José Cecilio del Valle, quien había sido electo Presidente de la República de Centro América” (page 244).

April

Monterey 1977:  Abril 5, 1834—“El Jefe Supremo de El Salvador, ciudadano Joaquín San Martín, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Vice-Jefe ciudadano Lorenzo González” (page 244).

May

Figeac 1938:  “Para restablecer el orden, Morazán consiguió de la Asamblea Federal la emisión del decreto de 29 de mayo de 1834, acordando el traslado de las autoridades supremas de la Federación a San Salvador, lo que fue efectuado el 16 de junio del mismo año” (page 109).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 13, 1834—“Se instala en la ciudad de Sonsonate el Congreso Federal…Mayo 29, 1834—Las Autoridades Federales acuerdan trasladarse de Sonsonate a San Salvador, noticiando esta disposición al Gobierno del Estado.  May 30, 1834—Fué asesinado…el Vice-Jefe en ejercicio del Mando Supremo, Ciudadano Lorenzo González.  El Jefe Supremo del Estado, Ciudadano Joaquín San Martín, asume Mando Supremo por la muerte del Vice-Jefe González” (page 244). 

June

Figeac 1938:  “Al ser separado don Joaquín San Martín de sus funciones gubernativas, entró a subragarlo el general don Carlos Salazar” (page 110).

Ingersoll 1972:  “President Morazán continued his attack on El Salvador and, on June 23, 1834, defeated San Martín’s forces” (page 15).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 23 de junio de 1834, San Martín entregó el gobierno al General Carlos Salazar, quien fue impuesto por el General Morazán.  Después fue condenado San Martín a dos años de destierro y a confiscación de bienes” (page 32).  “General Carlos Salazar (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  23 Junio al 13 de Julio de 1834” (page 33).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 23—Se empeñó un reñido combate en las calles de la ciudad capital de El Salvador, entre las tropas del Gobierno de aquel Estado que mandaba el Coronel José Dolores Castillo, y la guarnición federal que existía en dicha ciudad á las órdenes del General Salazar.  La refriega duró cinco horas, al cabo de las cuales la victoria se declaró a favor de los federales.  Este acontecimiento dio lugar á un nuevo cambio en la administración política del Estado del Salvador” (pages 83-84).

Monterey 1977:  Junio 2, 1834—“En Sonsonate el Congreso Federal convoca a nuevas elecciones de Presidente Federal por la muerte del Licenciado José Cecilio del Valle; elige como Vice Presidente Federal al Senador, Ciudadano José Gregorio Salazar, por falta de mayoría de votos…Junio 6, 1834—El General Francisco Morazán invade con el ejército federal y guatemalteco la ciudad de San Salvador, sin respetar al Gobierno del Estado” (page 245).  Junio 12, 1834—José Gregorio Salazar “nombra a su hermano, el General Carlos Salazar, Jefe Provisional del Estado de El Salvador…Junio 13, 1834—El Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, Ciudadano Joaquín San Martín…resuelve recobrar la plaza de San Salvador…Junio 23, 1834—(D)errotadas las fuerzas del Jefe Supremo San Martín” (page 247).

July

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don José Gregorio Salazar (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  13 de Julio al 30 de Septiembre de 1834” (page 35).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 2, 1834—“El Gobierno Provisorio de El Salvador, decreta mandando renovar todos los miembros de las Municipalidades del Estado, debiendo elegir los individuos que deben componer las Municipalidades el domingo seis de este mes” (page 247).  Julio 16, 1834—“El Presidente Federal General Francisco Morazán deposita el Mando Federal en el Senador, General José Gregorio Salazar, por haber terminado su período administrativo” (page 248).

September

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 21 de septiembre de 1834 se instaló en la ciudad de San Vicente la Asamblea del Estado de El Salvador, que fue mandada a elegir por don José Gregorio Salazar…El mismo mes de septiembre del mismo año, la Asamblea Legislativa declaró nulos los votos para elección de Jefe Supremo, Vice-Jefe y Magistrados, por encontrarles faltas legales.  El 30 de septiembre de 1834, la Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador acordó entregar el Mando Supremo de la Nación, al Consejero Joaquín Escolán y Balibrera” (page 35).  “Don Joaquín Escolán y Balibrera (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  30 Septiembre al 14 de Octubre de 1834” (page 37).

October

Figeac 1938:  “(P)racticadas las elecciones del caso, para proveer las vacantes de jefe y vice-jefe del Estado de El Salvador, los votos recayeron a favor de don Dionisio Herrera y del licenciado don José María Silva, acordándose por el Augusto Cuerpo Legislativo que el gobierno salvadoreño funcionara en la ciudad de San Vicente...Ante la sistemática actitud del renunciante, motivada al parecer por resquemores políticos, se hizo cargo de la dirección del Estado el vice-jefe licenciado don José María Silva, mientras tanto eran llamados los pueblos a nuevas elecciones” (page 110).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(E)l mes de octubre…la Asamblea Legislativa designa la ciudad de San Vicente, para residencia de las Autoridades Supremas del Estado…El 14 de octubre de 1834 entregó la 1a Magistratura al Licenciado José María Silva” (page 37).  “Licenciado José María Silva (salvadoreño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe:  14 Octubre de 1834 al 2 de Marzo de 1835…Gobernó como Vice-Jefe por renuncia que hiciera el Jefe Supremo electo” (page 49).

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 14, 1834—“La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador, habiendo procedido a la regulación de los sufragios dados por las juntas electorales de los cuatro Departamentos, para Jefe y Vice-Jefe Supremos del Estado y por haberse declarado nulas las votaciones del Departamento de San Vicente, no hay en ellos elección popular; procedió a elegir entre los candidates, resultando electo como Jefe Supremo del Estado, el ciudadano Dionisio Herrera (pariente del General Morazán), y como Vice-Jefe el Lic. José María Silva…Ese día toma posesión del Mando Supremo, el Vice-Jefe Lic. José María Silva, por haberse negado el ciudadano Dionisio Herrera a aceptar el nombramiento que en él hizo la Asamblea Legislativa” (page 249).

1835

Bonilla 2000a:  “1835.  Por decreto del Congreso Federal, San Salvador es designada capital de la República Federal y cabecera del Distrito Federal, donde permanece hasta 1839” (page 112).

Herrera 2005:  “Los pueblos continuaron divididos entre las antiguas parcialidades de indios y ladinos…Divisiones que, en el transcurso de los años, se agravaron al tomar unos y otros partido por las diversas facciones que lucharon por el poder político estatal o se enfrentaron a las autoridades federales…Así lo manifestaban los indios del pueblo de Cojutepeque a otras poblaciones vecinas, en 1835.  Ellos vieron en el jefe de Estado de ese entonces, Nicolás Espinosa, un líder capaz de resolver sus problemas” (page 929).

Lauria Santiago 1995:  “Como parte del movimiento ligado a Espinoza, una milicia indígena dirigida por Atanacio Flores tomó varias ciudades y pueblos en la región central y norcentral de El Salvador, encontrando gran apoyo en la ciudad de Cojutepeque y en todo el departamento de Cuscatlán.  El Gobierno de la Federación tuvo que enviar tropas contra esta” (page 240).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1835 President Morazán removed General Nicolás Espinoza as chief of state after only a few months in power.  Espinoza was accused of conspiring with the Indians of the central region and their allies in Guatemala to overthrow the Federation and establish an Indian republic.  He had managed to tap into deeply felt ethnic resentments of the Indians in an attempt to gain their support” (page 108).

January

Ingersoll 1972:  “On January 28, 1835, the legislature of El Salvador moved to the new state capital at San Vicente” (page 15).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 17, 1835—“Fueron electos como Senadores del Estado de El Salvador a la Federación, los ciudadanos Mariano Prado y Diego Vigil y como suplente, el ciudadano Francisco Padilla” (page 252). 

February

Ingersoll 1972:  “(O)n February 7, 1835, San Salvador became the Federal District” (page 15).

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 7—Fue erigida en distrito federal la ciudad de San Salvador con algunos de los pueblos circunvecinos…Febrero 13—El Congreso federal decreta una nueva Constitución política para la República reformando la de 1824” (page 86).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 2, 1835—“El Congreso Federal declara reelecto popularmente al General Francisco Morazán, como Presidente de Centro América, y al General José Gregorio Salazar, como Vice Presidente, concluyendo el período el primero de febrero de 1839.  Febrero 7, 1835—El Congreso Federal, decreta:  erigiendo a la ciudad de San Salvador como Capital Federal, la que con los pueblos de su jurisdicción formará el Distrito Federal.  Febrero 14, 1835—El Presidente Federal, General Francisco Morazán…toma posesión de la Presidencia Federal” (page 253). 

March

Figeac 1938:  “Abiertos los comicios públicos y oído el parecer del gran elector, salió triunfante la candidatura del general y licenciado don Nicolás Espinosa, a quien la Asamblea puso en posesión de sus dignísimas funciones” (page 111).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 2 de marzo de 1835, por renuncia que hizo el ciudadano don Dionisio Herrera (hondureño), al nombramiento de Jefe Supremo del Estado, se le entregó el Poder al Consejero don Joaquín Escolán y Balibrera.  Gobernó como Consejero hasta el 10 de abril de 1835” (page 37).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 2, 1835—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, en vista de la reiterada renuncia que el ciudadano Dionisio Herrera ha hecho del nombramiento de Jefe Supremo del Estado, acuerda:  admitírsela y convocar a elecciones de Jefe Supremo del Estado, señalando el día quince del corriente mes para que se verifiquen…Marzo 15, 1835—Fué electo popularmente el Benemérito General Nicolás Espinoza, como Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador” (page 254).

April

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado y general Nicolás Espinoza (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe de Estado:  10 Abril al 15 de Noviembre de 1835” (page 39).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 6, 1835—“La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador declara popularmente electo como Jefe Supremo del Estado, al Benemérito Licenciado General Nicolás Espinoza y como Vice Jefe al Licenciado José María Silva.  Los electores fueron 103, el General Espinoza obtuvo 64…Abril 10, 1835—Toma posesión del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, el Licenciado General Nicolás Espinoza” (pages 254-255).

May

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 22—El departamento de San Salvador…comenzó desde esta fecha á denominarse departamento de ‘Cuzcatlán,’ y la ciudad de Santa Ana fue elevada al rango de capital del departamento de Zonzonate” (page 87).

September

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En septiembre de 1835, por Decreto Legislativo se erigió el Departamento de San Vicente con los Partidos de Sensuntepeque y San Vicente” (page 39).

November

Figeac 1938:  Vice jefe “Silva le hizo creer al mandatario guatemalteco que el general Espinosa intentaba promover ciertos disturbios revolucionarios en el vecino Estado, así como una lucha de castas en El Salvador...Esta noticia llegó a conocimiento del presidente de la Federación, general Francisco Morazán” (page 111).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Coronel y licenciado Francisco Gómez (costarricense) gobernó como Consejero:  15 Noviembre de 1835 al 1o de Febrero de 1836…Fue impuesto como Gobernante de El Salvador, por el General Francisco Morazán, después de deponer al Gobernante de entonces, el Licenciado y Coronel Nicolás Espinoza” (page 41).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 15, 1835—“Fué depuesto del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, el Benemérito Licenciado Coronel Nicolás Espinoza, por el General Francisco Morazán.  Este es el tercer Jefe depuesto por el General Francisco Morazán.  Asumió el Mando el Consejero, ciudadano Francisco Gómez” (page 258).

1836

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 28, 1836—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador admite la renuncia del Mando Supremo, al Lic. y General Benemérito Nicolás Espinoza y la del Vice-Jefe Lic. José María Silva” (page 259).

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  Francisco Gómez “entregó el mando Supremo el 1o de febrero de 1836, al señor Diego Vigil (pariente del General Morazán)” (page 41).  “Don Diego Vigil (hondureño) gobernó como Jefe Supremo:  1o de febrero de 1836 al 23 de mayo de 1837…Fue impuesto como Jefe Supremo de El Salvador, por el General Francisco Morazán, de quien era pariente.  Como Vice-Jefe:  don Timoteo Menéndez” (page 43).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 1836—“Se instala en San Salvador el Senado y el Congreso Federales…Marzo 7, 1836—La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, eligió al ciudadano Diego Vigil (pariente del General Morazán) ex-Jefe de Honduras, como Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador y como Vice-Jefe, al ciudadano Timoteo Menéndez” (page 259).

1837

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1837 the peasants of the Volcán de Santa Ana revolted against local and Federation authorities with the support of Guatemala’s General Carrera” (page 112).  “Other Indian villages rose up in May 1837…Although these upheavals failed to bring about a change of regime, they led to the eventual defeat of Morazán’s liberal faction by conservatives allied to Carrera in Guatemala” (page 113).

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1837—“En este mes los estragos del cólera morbus en el Estado de El Salvador se extienden por todos los pueblos” (page 262).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 13, 1837—“El Congreso Federal se declara solemnemente instalado en la ciudad capital San Salvador.  La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador, por no haber mayoría de votos en las elecciones, designa como Senadores Propietarios, a los ciudadanos Máximo Orellana y Juan Manuel Rodríguez, y como Suplente al Presbítero Mariano Antonio de Lara” (pages 264-265).

May

Lauria Santiago 1995:  “Durante mayo de 1837, cuatro mil indios cojutepeques, convencidos de que los ladinos habían envenenado las aguas del pueblo y causado una epidemia del cólera, se levantaron y tomaron el control del mismo…Junto con gente de Zacatecoluca atacaron el cuartel de esta cercana población…Unos días más tarde, con los mismos indios nonualcos atacaron el cuartel de San Vicente…Morazán envió tropas…de San Salvador para ayudar a pacificar la región” (page 240).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El día 23 de mayo de 1837, estalla una insurrección de indígenas en Zacatecoluca y Cojutepeque, robando y asesinando.  En esa misma fecha entrega [Vigil] el Supremo Poder a don Timoteo Menéndez” (page 43).  “Don Timoteo Menéndez (salvadoreño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe:  23 de Mayo al 7 de Junio de 1837” (page 45).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 23, 1837—“Una insurrección de los indígenas de Zacatecoluca y Cojutepeque, sorprenden los cuarteles de Zacatecoluca…Mayo 26, 1837—Los facciosos indígenas de Cojutepeque y los nonualcos atacan el cuartel de San Vicente…Mayo 27, 1837—(F)uerzas federales enviadas desde San Salvador reestablecen el orden y desalojan a los insurrectos” (page 266).

June

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Diego Vigil gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  7 de junio de 1837 al 6 de Enero de 1838…Vigil “vuelve como Jefe Supremo el 7 de junio de 1837.  En junio 15 de 1837 estalla en Santa Ana un Movimiento Revolucionario, pero es sofocado.  El Gobierno decreta amnistía para todos los comprometidos en los movimientos revolucionarios” (page 43).

1838

January

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 6 de enero de 1838 [Vigil] entregó la Primera Magistratura a don Timoteo Menéndez” (page 43).  “Don Timoteo Menéndez (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  6 de Enero de 1838 al 23 de Mayo de 1839” (page 45).

February

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1838—“El General Rafael Carrera toma la ciudad de Guatemala; las tropas…asesinan al Vice-Presidente Federal General José Gregorio Salazar, y deponen al Jefe del Estado, Dr. Mariano Gálvez, quien desde el año de 1831 había sido electo por la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado” (page 268). Febrero 2, 1838—“El Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, ciudadano Diego Vigil, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Vice-Jefe Timoteo Menéndez…Febrero 24, 1838—La Asamblea Legislativa decreta fusionar en una misma Municipalidad, las de Asunción y Dolores Izalco, con el nombre de Villa Izalco” (page 269).

May

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 30—El Congreso federal declara libres á los Estados que componían la Federación de Centro-América para que pudieran constituirse del modo que tuviesen por conveniente, conservando, empero, la forma de Gobierno popular representativo” (page 104).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 1, 1838—“El Congreso Federal declara electo popularmente, como Vice Presidente Federal, al ciudadano Diego Vigil, según elección mandada a practicar el diez de Abril de 1837…En el Estado de El Salvador no se han practicado elecciones de Autoridades Federales” (page 272).

July

Monterey 1977:  Julio 1838—“Al llegar a San Salvador el General Francisco Morazán asume la Presidencia de la disuelta Federación” (page 273).

October

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “Following a major popular revolt in San Salvador in September 1838, Carrera again attacked the cities of Santa Ana and Ahuachapán on October 28, withdrawing to Guatemala after the raid.  He received support from the region’s Indians” (page 113).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 28 de octubre de 1838, el General Rafael Carrerra…invadió el Estado de El Salvador, tomando las ciudades de Santa Ana y Ahuachapán…El General Morazán derrota a Carrera” (page 45).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El Dr. [Pedro] Barriere había sustituido a principios de 1821 en la Intendencia y Gobernación de la Provincia de San Salvador, al General y Dr. José María Peinado, que había fallecido” (page 5).

February

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 24, 1821—“El General del Ejército Español, Agustín de Iturbide, proclama en Iguala, la independencia de México” (page 60).

Woodward 1985:  “Iturbide’s Plan de Iguala in Mexico forced the issue of independence into [Central American] politics in…1821” (page 88).

August

Monterey 1977:  Agosto 1821—“El Capitán General del Reino de Guatemala, Brigadier Gabino Gaínza, publica un manifiesto en contra de la Independencia de Centro América y manda procesar a los independientes” (page 61).  Agosto 12, 1821—“En Chiapas, en la ciudad de Comitán, se dió el Primer Grito de la libertad de las seis Provincias de Centro América, independiente del sistema de gobierno de México” (page 61).

September

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(E)l Dr. Barriere [cubano] gobernó desde el 21 de septiembre de 1821 [al 28 de noviembre de 1821].  Fue el último Intendente Colonial y el Primer Gobernante en carácter de Jefe Político con funciones de Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia.  Cuando Manuel José Arce, al frente de un puñado de entusiastas salvadoreños, que deseaban votar por los individuos de una Junta Económica Consultiva, se presentaron el 30 de septiembre del mismo año de 1821, ante el Intendente Dr. Barriere, éste eludió la elección para la cual ya se había convocado, puso muchos pretextos, disolviendo la reunión y mandando a encarcelar a los patriotas” (page 5).

Lindo-Fuentes 1990:  “No armed struggle was necessary to end colonial rule; the Spaniards were too busy trying to retain Mexico and its wealth to pay much attention to the poor region of Central America…After the news came that the Mexican independence was a fact, a meeting was held on the fifteenth of September with all the authorities of the colony and, after deciding in favor of independence, an act to that effect was written and signed…Central America gained independence as a single country, and not until 1839 were the individual states going to separate…A newly independent country had been signed into existence, but the new leaders did not quite agree on what to do with it” (page 36).  “(T)he end of Spanish rule left a power vacuum that horrified Guatemalan merchants…Independence…brought into the open deep divisions that had existed since the late eighteenth century.  The bitter struggle between liberals and conservatives acquired new strength.  The resentments created by the heavy-handed practices of the Guatemalan merchants were translated into resentments from the provinces against Guatemala” (page 37).

Marure 1895:  “Septiembre 29—Se verifica en la ciudad capital de la provincia de San Salvador la solemne proclamación de la independencia absoluta, jurada ya desde el 22 del mismo mes de septiembre por el Intendente, Diputación provincial, y demás autoridades locales” (page 2).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 15, 1821—“En la Ciudad de Guatemala la Junta Popular convocada por el Ayuntamiento, a instancia de los patriotas, declara por vez primera, la emancipación política de Centro America” (page 62).  Reproduces the “Acta de Independencia” (pages 62-65).

Woodward 1985:  “The success of Iturbide’s Plan and indications that a Mexican army might be forthcoming to ‘liberate’ Central America had much to do with Guatemala’s decision to declare the kingdom independent on September 15, 1821…The immediate issue became not independence from Spain, but rather the alternatives of being an independent republic versus being annexed to the Mexican Empire” (page 89).

November

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “José Matías Delgado toma posesión como Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia de San Salvador y envía al exilio a Pedro Berrier” (page 44).

Figeac 1938:  “Se acordó…señalar un mes, contable a partir del 30 de noviembre, para que los pueblos del antiguo Reino de Guatemala expresaran su parecer en Cabildo abierto” (page 68).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Presbitero y doctor José Matías Delgado (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Político Civil:  28 noviembre de 1821 al 9 de febrero de 1823” (page 7).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 28, 1821—“El Doctor José Matías Delgado, toma posesión de la Intendencia y Gobernación de la Provincia de San Salvador, y nombra la Junta de Gobierno...Se instala en San Salvador la Junta de Gobierno, siendo el Doctor José Matías Delgado el Presidente, y los miembros que la componían, los ciudadanos Manuel José Arce, Juan Manuel Rodríguez, Leandro Fagoaga, Presbítero José Miguel de Castro, Juan Fornos y el Presbítero Basilio Saldaña, Secretario don Mariano Fagoaga...El Intendente de la Provincia de San Salvador, Doctor José Matías Delgado, convoca a los pueblos de la Provincia, para que elijan Diputados a la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador...Noviembre 30, 1821—El Capitán General Gaínza...convoca a ‘Cabildo Abierto’, para oír la opinión de los Ayuntamientos, sobre la anexión al Imperio de México” (page 71).

December

Monterey 1977:  Iturbide communicates his intent to annex the provinces of Central America to Mexico should they refuse to join his empire willingly (page 72).

1822

January

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “El 5 de enero la Junta Provisional Consultiva decreta la anexión a México, en San Salvador no es acatada esta resolución y se constituye una Junta de Gobierno, nombrando como Comandante general a Manuel José Arce” (page 44).

Figeac 1938:  “23 Ayuntamientos dijeron que solamente el Congreso General podría resolver la proposición; 104, entre los que estaba la casi totalidad de los pueblos enclavados en lo que al día es territorio guatemalteco, dijeron que se acordara la unión a México; 11 se decidieron por la anexión propuesta, pero bajo condiciones; 32 dejaron al arbitrio de la Junta Provisional la resolución del delicado asunto; varios Ayuntamientos no contestaron la excitativa; y solamente San Salvador y Granada se declaron categórica y francamente, contra el funesto paso de la anexión…El 5 de enero de 1822, haciendo a un lado la desfavorable actitud de los Ayuntamientos de San Salvador y Granada y el silencio que otros guardaban como tácita protesta, fue declarada la unión propuesta por don Agustín de Iturbide…El sabio Valle pedía que se oyera el parecer de 67 Ayuntamientos que no habían contestado, pero sus argumentaciones resultaron estériles” (page 68).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En enero 11 de 1822 en San Salvador, presididos por el padre Delgado, el Ayuntamiento y numeroso público protestan por la resolución de la Junta Consultiva del Gobierno de Guatemala de incorporar a Centro América al Imperio Mexicano.  En esta fecha el Gobierno de San Salvador se separa de Guatemala en lo económico, político y gubernativo” (page 9).

Marure 1895:  “Enero 5—La Junta gubernativa de Guatemala declara que la voluntad de la mayoría de los pueblos que componían el Reyno, estaba pronunciada por la unión al imperio mejicano—San Salvador y Granada desconocen la legitimidad de esta declaratoria y resuelven sostener con las armas el pronunciamiento de independencia absoluta” (page 5).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 5, 1822—“Verificado en Guatemala el escrutinio de los votos de los Ayuntamientos, según el acuerdo de Noviembre 30 de 1821, resultó que, algunos Ayuntamientos se adhierieron a la anexión a México; otros proponían que el Congreso Constituyente resolviera; otros no contestaron categóricamente; y muchos no recibieron la excitativa; San Salvador y San Vicente se niegan a reconocer el nuevo amo que se les proponía...Enero 7, 1822—El Capitán General Gaínza comunica al Ayuntamiento de San Salvador, que el cinco del mes, la Junta Consultiva del Gobierno de Guatemala acordó la unión al Imperio Mexicano de toda Centro América” (page 74).  On January 11, San Salvador’s Junta Provisional Gubernativa decides to separate from Guatemala in protest over Gaínza’s decision to join Iturbide and renames itself the Junta de Gobierno (page 75).  “Santa Ana, Sonsonate y San Miguel se declaran unidas al Imperio de México” (page 76).

Vidal 1970:  “Junta Provincial” of El Salvador becomes “Junta de Gobierno” in January 1822.  Gives names of members (page 142).

White 1973:  “The conservative ‘criollo’ interests which existed in all the towns but were strongest in Guatemala were inclined at first to favour inclusion in a conservative Mexico, as a strong state in which their local interests would be respected and preserved.  The liberals of the rest of the isthmus, whose main fear at first was a Guatemalan hegemony, assented to this inclusion in Mexico, and Central America became a part of Mexico from 5 January 1822 until 1 July 1823.  The single exception to this consent was San Salvador with San Vicente:  the dominant liberals here were just as opposed to a conservative Mexican regime as a Guatemalan one” (page 63).

Woodward 1985:  “In the province there were mixed reactions to the decisions made by the central government in Guatemala.  Establishment of three ‘comandancias,’ with seats of power at Ciudad Real (with jurisdiction over Chiapas and Los Altos), Guatemala (Guatemala and El Salvador), and León (Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica), followed the precedent of the provincial deputations, but challenged more traditional provincial loyalties.  While the majority of the ayuntamientos of the kingdom approved of annexation, there was notable opposition in San Salvador, which had become the leader of the attack on the hegemony of the capital” (pages 89-90).

Wortman 1982:  “The January 3 decision to unite was far from unanimous:  115 towns voted for adhesion, 32 desired independence with Guatemala, 23 chose to leave the decision to a future Congress, and 77 cabildos did not respond.  Thus, with less than 50 percent of the municipalities voting in favor of the union, Central America joined Mexico.  Still Central America was far from united.  Each cabildo considered itself autonomous, and few recognized the prerogatives of Guatemala as a national capital” (page 230).  “The indigo-producing areas of Santa Ana, San Miguel, and Gotera, controlled by families outside the city of San Salvador, pledged union to the central government and separation from the old province.  Guatemala sent officials to San Miguel to take command of the civilian militia…The leadership in Salvador responded,…threatening retaliation if Guatemala dismembered Salvador” (page 231).

February

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En febrero comienzan los enfrentamientos entre Guatemala y El Salvador por las diferencias frente a la anexión” (page 44).

March

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “La Junta Provisional de Gobierno erige el Obispado de San Salvador; nombrando a José Matías Delgado como obispo” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “La Junta Provisional Gubernativa también tomó una de las decisiones más polémicas de la época:  el 30 de marzo de 1822 erigió el Obispado de San Salvador haciéndose nombrar Delgado, Obispo…El paso dio origen a un cisma religioso ante la oposición del Arzobispo de Guatemala” (page 51).

Figeac 1938:  “Cumpliendo instrucciones del jefe político superior, salió de Guatemala el 19 de marzo el coronel don Manuel Arzú, comandando un ejército que debería tomar la ciudad de San Salvador” (page 69).

Llanes 1995:  “In El Salvador a sector of the clergy had a leading role in the movement for independence.  A chief motive for the ‘criollo’ clergy to become involved in independence was their desire for a Salvadorian diocese.  The Salvadorian legislature decreed on 30 March 1822 the erection of a Salvadorian diocese and the election of Matías Delgado as bishop of El Salvador.  The decree was repudiated by Archbishop Ramón Casaus…[who] resided in Guatemala and was a strong supporter of the Conservative party” (page 40).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 30—La Junta gubernativa de San Salvador acuerda erigir en una nueva diócesis aquella provincia y nombra por su primer Obispo al presbítero doctor José Matías Delgado” (page 5).

April

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En abril de 1822, el Coronel Manuel Arzú, al mando de tropas guatemaltecas, ocupa militarmente Santa Ana y Sonsonate” (page 9).

June

Bonilla 2000:  “El gobierno derrotó una invasión guatemalteca encabezada por el General Manuel Arzú, el 3 de junio de 1822” (page 51).

Figeac 1938:  “Las fuerzas invasoras llegaron fácilmente a la capital salvadoreña y la tomaron…Los soldados guatemaltecos se dedicaron al pillaje…(E)sta conducta exasperó a los vencidos, hasta el grado de reorganizarse para atacar a sus vencedores, lo que felizmente hicieron el 4 de junio” (page 69).  “El 12 de junio entró en Guatemala el general don Vicente Filísola…(T)raía instrucciones de substituir a Gainza en la jefatura política de Guatemala” (page 70).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 3—El Coronel don Manuel Arzú, á la cabeza de un cuerpo de tropas guatemaltecas, denominado ‘Columna Imperial,’ ataca la plaza de San Salvador, y logra penetrar en su recinto; pero después de un largo tiroteo…es repelido y obligado á retirarse” (page 6).

Wortman 1982:  “In June 1822 a Guatemalan force invaded Salvador, easily outflanked its troops, and took San Salvador.  The Guatemalans immediately disbanded and began sacking the city.  The Salvadorans reformed quickly, marched on San Salvador, caught the Guatemalans disorganized, and easily defeated them...Soon after the Guatemalan defeat, the Mexican commander Vicente Filísola arrived [in Guatemala], took command, organized the regime, freed those liberals who remained in jail, and imposed some stability.  He could not, however, deal with the secessionist tendencies of the provinces” (page 231).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1, 1822—“El Emperador Iturbide ordena al Brigadier Filísola que ataque a la Provincia de San Salvador, si inmediatamente no se une a México, sobre las bases de una entera sumisión al Gobierno Imperial, y sin condición alguna que pudiese contrariarla... Octubre 2, 1822—La Junta de Gobierno de la Provincia de San Salvador...convoca a un Congreso a los Representantes del Pueblo, para que pronuncien el sistema político que más les convenga aceptar...El Congreso se reunirá en la ciudad de San Salvador el diez del mes de Noviembre próximo, las elecciones se harán de nuevo, con arreglo a la Constitución de España, y por la base de un Diputado por cada cinco mil habitantes, las primeras Juntas Electorales de parroquia, se celebrarán el domingo 13 del corriente; las Juntas Electorales de Partido, el domingo veinte siguiente, y el veintisiete las de Provincia, pora nombrar los Diputados” (pages 95-96).

November

Bonilla 2000:  “La provincia de San Salvador…había comenzado a gobernarse independientemente y a constituir sus órganos estatales.  Se convocó a un Congreso Legislativo Extraordinario, que inició sesiones el 10 de noviembre de 1822.  Este cuerpo político ratificó la erección de la Diócesis en San Salvador y el nombramiento de Delgado como Obispo.  Delgado devino, así, un hombre poderoso al ocupar, simultáneamente, las máximas sillas del poder secular y espiritual” (page 51).

Marure 1895:  “Noviembre 1o—Se instaló el Congreso provincial de San Salvador, en la ciudad de este nombre, convocado con el objeto de resolver si aquella provincia debía permanecer independiente ó incorporarse al imperio mejicano” (page 6).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 10, 1822—“Se reúne en San Salvador el Congreso Legislativo Extraordinario con treinta y tres Representantes” (page 97).

December

Marure 1895:  “Diciembre 2—El Congreso provincial de San Salvador declara unida aquella provincia á los Estados-Unidos del Norte de América, adoptando en todas partes la Constitución de aquella República, y con calidad de formar un nuevo Estado en la federación norte-americana…Este acuerdo, dictado solamente con la idea de imponer al Jefe de las fuerzas imperiales que asediaban á San Salvador, no tuvo ningún resultado ni pasó de una de esas medidas que se adoptan indeliberadamente en momento de conflicto” (page 7).

Monterey 1977:  Under the threat of attack from Mexican forces, delegates to the Salvadoran congress vote on December 2, 1822 to annex themselves to the United States (page 98).  Diciembre 31, 1822—“El Secretario de Guerra y Marina del Imperio Mexicano, ordena al Brigadier Filísola, tomar a toda costa la Ciudad de San Salvador, disolver el Congreso y aplicar la pena de muerte conforme a la ordenanza” (page 100).

Vidal 1970:  Gives number of representatives in the “Congreso Provincial” of El Salvador in December 1822 and describes their vote for annexation to the United States (page 145).

White 1973:  “It was during the period of liberal ascendancy, when San Salvador was for a time successfully resisting the onslaught of the Mexican and Guatemalan forces, that the curious idea arose of requesting the admission of El Salvador into the United States of America as a member state.  The motion was carried on 5 December 1822, by the Legislative Congress that had been convened, and five of the leading liberals went to Washington.  But they did not set off until after the fall of San Salvador to the Mexican army and the overthrow of Iturbide; these events changed the situation and they waited for four months in the United States while it became clearer:  they never made the request” (page 64).

1823

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Así terminó su período de Gobierno el Presbítero y Dr. José Matías Delgado y la primera Junta de Gobierno [el 9 de febrero 1823]” (page 10).  “Brigadier Vicente Filísola (mexicano e italiano) asumió la Jefatura de Hecho:  9 febrero al 7 de mayo de 1823…El 10 del mismo mes el Brigadier Filísola declara anexado al Imperio Mexicano la Provincia de San Salvador” (page 15).

Lindo-Fuentes 1990:  “Mexican troops invaded San Salvador for a second time and forced the state into submission…The number of people involved in the military operations, the pillage, and the other means used to finance the armies were enough to deplete the almost empty coffers of the new nation.  Guatemalan, Mexican, and Salvadoran troops had been mobilized from March of 1822 until February of the following year…Rather than filling the power vacuum created by independence the Mexican invasion helped to expose the divisions that would plague Central America for two decades” (page 38).

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 7—El General don Vicente Filísola á la cabeza de una división de tropas imperiales de cerca de dos mil hombres, se posesiona de la plaza de San Salvador á viva fuerza.  Febrero 10—Sojuzgada por las armas imperiales, la ciudad de San Salvador, verifica la solemne proclamación y juramento de unión al imperio mejicano” (page 7).  “Febrero 21—Las fuerzas salvadoreñas que se retiraron de la plaza de San Salvador después del ataque del 7 de febrero, capitulan en Gualsinze con el General Filísola.  Con este suceso se consumó el completo sometimiento de la provincia de San Salvador al imperio mejicano” (page 8).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 9, 1823—“Entra a la ciudad de San Salvador el Brigadier Filísola con su ejército; respeta las personas y bienes y asume el mando supremo de la Provincia...Febrero 10, 1823—El Brigadier Filísola declara anexado al Imperio Mexicano a la Provincia El Salvador...Febrero 19, 1823—El Emperador Iturbide abdica la Corona Imperial de México” (page 104).

White 1973:  “(T)he army sent from Mexico and Guatemala…defeated Salvadorean resistance in February 1823.  Iturbide was overthrown in the same month by the opponents of his Napoleonic aspirations in Mexico, and after that little support remained in Central America for the incorporation into Mexico” (page 63).

March

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En marzo, Filísola nombra al Coronel Felipe Codallos intendente y gobernador de la provincia de El Salvador” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “Filísola convocó a la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente el 29 de marzo de 1823” (page 52).

Figeac 1938:  “El 29 de marzo de 1823, [Filísola] presentó a la Diputación Provincial de Guatemala el decreto de convocatoria a elecciones...El decreto electoral reunió en los comicios públicos a los miembros de los partidos conservador y liberal, obteniendo el triunfo éstos últimos” (page 72).

White 1973:  “After the abdication of Emperor Agustín I (Iturbide), the Mexican General Filísola who was in command of the army in Guatemala, and in El Salvador…summoned representatives from [the Central American states] to a National Constituent Assembly in Guatemala” (page 64).

April

Figeac 1938:  “Las elecciones se efectuaron sin incidentes desagradables y de esta primera función del sufragio salieron triunfantes las candidaturas de los diputados que deberían representar en el Congreso a la Provincia de San Salvador” (page 72).  Lists the names of those elected with the Salvadoran towns they represented.

Herrera 2005:  “Los centroamericanos eligieron a sus diputados y estos—básicamente los guatemaltecos y los de San Salvador, pues los de las otras provincias, por su lejanía, llegaron tarde—conformaron la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente” (page 920).

Lindo-Fuentes 1990:  “After the Mexicans left, the main authority was the ‘Asamblea Nacional Constituyente,’ which was elected to write the constitution of the federation and began at once to enact a liberal program” (page 46).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 1823—“En la Provincia de El Salvador fueron electos Diputados al Congreso Nacional Constituyente...Al efectuarse las elecciones...predominaron en las Provincias los independientes sobre los anexionistas, derrotados por la caída del Imperio mexicano.  En la Asamblea tenía que predominar el partido liberal o fiebre, quien quería establecer el sistema federal...; los anexionistas, llamados conservadores y serviles, opinaban por el sistema central unitario” (page 106).  Gives the names of deputies.

May

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En mayo es obligado a salir Codallos y se nombra como Jefe Supremo a Mariano Prado” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “En San Salvador, en el mes de mayo, el Ayuntamiento y el pueblo amotinado obligan al Intendente y Gobernador impuesto por México, Felipe Codallos, y a sus soldados a evacuar la ciudad.  Mariano Prado fue nombrado Jefe Supremo Político y gobernaba cuando se estableció la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente” (page 52).

Figeac 1938:  “(S)e reconcentró Filísola a Guatemala, dejando en el gobierno de la Provincia de San Salvador al coronel Codallos, el día 7 de mayo de 1823” (page 71).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Felipe Codallos (guatemalteco) gobernó como Jefe Militar Civil:  7 al 25 de mayo de 1823…El 25 de mayo…tomó el Poder una Junta Consultiva” (page 17).  “Gobernó del 25 de mayo al 17 de junio de 1823” (page 19).

Monterey 1977:  May 1823—“En San Salvador el Ayuntamiento y el pueblo amotinado obligan al Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia, el imperialista coronel Felipe Codallos y a sus quinientos soldados mexicanos y guatemaltecos, a evacuar la ciudad.  Fueron nombrados:  Jefe Supremo Político, don Mariano Prado; Intendente y Gobernador de la Provincia de San Salvador, el coronel José Justo Milla y Comandante Militar el coronel José de Rivas” (page 107).

June

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En junio se instala la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centroamérica” (page 44).

Bonilla 2000:  “El Congreso…se inauguró en Guatemala el 24 de junio de 1823” (page 52).

Herrera 2005:  “La Asamblea se instaló el 24 de junio y abrió sus sesiones el 29.  Entre los diputados que representaban a la Provincia de San Salvador estaba el cura José Matías Delgado, quien fue electo presidente de aquella corporación soberana, debido a la admiración que se había granjeado al liderar la oposición armada contra los mexicanos.  Cuando la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente abrió sus sesiones, la mayoría de sus diputados eran republicanos.  Sus opositores los llamaron, a partir de ese momento, ‘liberales’ y ‘fiebres,’ por la manera acalorada con que defendieron sus posturas.  La minoría recibió el nombre de ‘serviles’ y ‘moderados,’ hallándose entre ellos los adeptos a la unión mexicana, así como también los que defendían los intereses de las grandes familias guatemaltecas y del clero.  La historiografía posterior llamó a los primeros ‘liberales’ y a los segundos ‘conservadores’” (page 920).

Karnes 1976:  “Nearly three months after Filísola summoned them, the first delegates met in Guatemala City on June 24, 1823…The provinces had followed the stipulations of the act of independence of 1821 which authorized one delegate for each fifteen thousand persons and directed that the existing electoral ‘juntas’ make the selections.  The total allotment was sixty-four—Guatemala, twenty-eight; El Salvador, thirteen; Honduras, eleven; Nicaragua, eight; and Costa Rica, four—but this figure was not achieved until October.  In the meantime, blessed by the archbishop, a near-quorum of forty one Guatemalans and Salvadoreans began the task of ruling the Central American people.  Calling itself the National Constituent Assembly, this body was at the same time the government of Central America and the agency charged with drafting a constitution for the permanent republic of Central American states” (page 35).

Leistenschneider 1980:  La Junta Consultiva “entregó el Poder Supremo a don Mariano Prado el 17 de junio de 1823” (page 19).  “Don Mariano Prado (nicaragüense) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  17 de junio de 1823 al 22 de abril de 1824” (page 21).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 24—A virtud de la convocatoria expedida en 29 de marzo anterior, se instala en la ciudad de Guatemala, bajo la presidencia del presbítero doctor don José Matías Delgado, el Congreso General de las provincias que formaban el antiguo Reyno de aquel nombre” (page 10).

Monterey 1977:  Junio 8, 1823—“Llegan al puerto norteamericano de Boston los comisionados de la Provincia de El Salvador...comisionados para la admisión de la Provincia de El Salvador como Estado de la Federación de los Estados Unidos de Norte América...Junio 24, 1823—“Se instala en la ciudad de Guatemala el Congreso Nacional Constituyente de Centro América.  Asamblea compuesta de cuarenta y un Representantes, de los más célebres, instruidos y acreditados ciudadanos:  fué electo Presidente de aquella memorable Asamblea el Presbítero Dr. José Matías Delgado, por treinta y siete votos; como Vice-Presidente, el Presbítero Fernando Antonio Dávila” (page 107).

White 1973:  The national constituent assembly in Guatemala “sat from June 1823 until January 1825” (page 64).

July

Aguilar Avilés 2000:  “En julio, el Congreso declara su independencia de México, y la antigua Capitanía General recibe el nombre de Provincias Unidas de Centroamérica” (page 44).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 1, 1823—“La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centro América hace la segunda declaración de emancipación, declarando libres e independientes de España, México y de cualquiera otra potencia, a las Provincias centroamericanas,...que en lo sucesivo formarán un sólo Cuerpo Político con la denominación de Provincias Unidas de Centro América...La Asamblea...nombra para...Presidente el General Arce...El partido de los liberales adversó la candidatura para Presidente del Brigadier Vicente Filísola, que apoyaban los conservadores” (page 108).

White 1973:  The national constituent assembly “declared, on 1 July 1823, a new absolute independence as the United Provinces of Central America, covering these five states” (page 64).

Woodward 1985:  “(T)he abdication of Iturbide in March 1823 led to a declaration of absolute Central American independence on July 1” (pages 90-91).

August

Marure 1895:  “Agosto 22—Se dio el título de villas á los pueblos de Ahuachapán y Metapán en el departamento de Santa Ana, Estado del Salvador” (page 13).

September

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 11, 1823—“Los Comisionados de El Salvador en Washington presentan a aquel Gobierno las actas de incorporación a la Federación de los Estados Unidos de Norte América; manifestando que por haber cambiado la situación política de la Provincia, pedirían instrucciones a su Gobierno” (page 111).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1, 1823—“Por estar ya completa la representación de todas las Provincias centroamericanas, la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centro América, hace la tercera declaración de emancipación, ratificando la independencia de las Provincias Unidas de Centro América” (page 112).  Lists the names of all the deputies of all the provinces.  Octubre 4, 1823—“La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente, nombra al general Manuel José Arce, (ausente) Presidente, al doctor José Cecilio del Valle y al Lic. Tomás O’Horán, en reemplazo de los dimitentes” (page 113).  Octubre 5, 1823—“La Asamblea Nacional por ausencia del Gral. Manuel José Arce y del Lic. José Cecilio del Valle, nombra para mientras duren dichas ausencias, a don José Santiago Milla y a don Francisco Barrundia...Octubre 10, 1823—La Asamblea...por la renuncia del ciudadano José Francisco Barrundia, nombra como miembro del Poder Ejecutivo Nacional al ciudadano Juan Vicente Villacorta” (page 114).  Octubre 27, 1823—“La Diputación Provincial de El Salvador se erige en Junta Gubernativa, y asume todas las facultades que como tal le corresponden, las cuales ejerció hasta la instalación del Congreso Constituyente del Estado” (page 115).

December

Bonilla 2000:  La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente “dictó las ‘Bases de la Constitución’ el 17 de diciembre de 1823” (page 52).

Herrera 2005:  “Las bases de la Constitución, publicadas por la Asamblea Nacional, el 27 de diciembre de 1823,…planteaban que la república se compondría de cinco Estados…, los cuales eran libres e independientes en su administración interior…No obstante, la Provincia de San Salvador se adelantó a los hechos.  Las autoridades liberales salvadoreñas…anexaron, en diciembre de 1823, el territorio de Sonsonate, a través de la intimidación armada y las negociaciones…(P)or otro lado, las autoridades liberales de San Salvador, sin esperar la carta magna federal y a partir de las bases de la Constitución, convocaron a elecciones para formar un congreso constituyente” (page 922).

1824

Figeac 1938:  “Después del interinato que ejerció don Juan Manuel Rodríguez, entre enero y septiembre de 1824, y del que hizo don Mariano Prado desde el 1º de octubre al 12 de diciembre del mismo año, ocupó la alta jefatura del Estado de El Salvador el ciudadano don Juan Vicente Villacorta, conforme a las elecciones constitucionales que para el caso se efectuaron” (page 76).

Herrera 2005:  “El territorio del Estado del Salvador, antes de su fundación en 1824, estaba dividido en dos provincias, que en términos administrativos eran independientes una de la otra:  la Provincia de San Salvador (convertida en intendencia en 1786) y la Alcaldía Mayor de Sonsonate…(D)ependieron, en lo político, judicial y económico…de la audiencia, del capitán general…y del monopolio de los comerciantes guatemaltecos.  Los comerciantes eran redes de familias, encabezadas por los Aycinena…La elite ‘blanca’ de la Intendencia de San Salvador, compuesta por criollos y peninsulares, ocupaba los oficios más importantes de la vida política local—ayuntamientos—, así como de la vida eclesiástica (vicarías, curatos)” (page 916).

Wortman 1982:  “While the federal government completed its organization, the states attempted to form their own governments…Salvador seized the indigo-producing regions of Santa Ana and Sonsonate, under the control of the [Guatemalan] Aycinena group after Mexican occupation, in 1824” (page 235).

March

Bonilla 2000:  “En San Salvador, los líderes aprovecharon las Bases para convocar a una Asamblea Constituyente estatal sin que la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente necesariamente lo hubiera decidido y hecho.  La Asamblea Constituyente del estado inició sus sesiones bajo la presidencia de José María Calderón, e 14 de marzo de 1824” (page 58).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 5—Se instaló el primer Congreso Constituyente del Estado del Salvador” (page 17).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 14, 1824—“Se instala solemnemente el Primer Congreso Constituyente del Estado de El Salvador” (page 121).  Names the members of the congress (page 122).

April

Herrera 2005:  “(L)os diputados del nuevo Estado decretaron, el 27 de abril de 1824, la erección de la silla episcopal” (page 922).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Juan Manuel Rodríguez (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Político del 22 de abril al 1o de octubre de 1824…El 22 de abril de 1824, la Asamblea Constituyente dio posesión de Jefe de Estado, al ciudadano Juan Manuel Rodríguez” (page 23).

May

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En mayo de 1824, la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente, decreta creando Alcaldías en los pueblos de menos de mil habitantes” (page 23). 

Herrera 2005:  “La conducta prematura de los salvadoreños era problemática, porque…solo la Constitución federal podía designar la forma de gobierno de las provincias.  En ese caso, los salvadoreños debieron haber esperado hasta el 22 de noviembre de 1824, fecha en la cual se decretó la Constitución federal.  No obstante, su antelación…llevó a la Asamblea Nacional a decretar, el 5 de mayo de 1824, que cada una de ellas eligiera su congreso constituyente y su jefe de Estado…El obispo ratificado fue José Matías Delgado, quien tomó posesión de su cargo el 5 de mayo de 1824.  Hasta ese momento, Delgado fungía como diputado presidente de la Asamblea Nacional, en representación de San Salvador” (page 922).

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 5—La Asamblea Nacional Constituyente decreta que tengan congresos los cinco Estados de la República…El Congreso del Salvador se había ya reunido en la ciudad del mismo nombre, desde principios de marzo, con 11 representantes” (page 19).

June

Bonilla 2000:  “La Constitución de 1924 contiene la descripción de los poderes del Estado.  El capítulo 4 describe el Congreso, que ejerce el Poder Legislativo, electo cada dos años…El capítulo 5, describe el Consejo Representativo, electo por tres años…El capítulo 6 describe el Poder Ejecutivo, que era ejercido por un Jefo Supremo del Estado, electo por cuatro años.  El suplente del Jefe presidía el Consejo Representativo” (page 63).  “Por la nueva Constitución se erigen en junio los departamentos de Sonsonate, San Salvador, San Vicente y San Miguel” (page 72).

Figeac 1938:  El Congreso Constituyente “emitió la Constitución Política del Estado de El Salvador, el día 12 de junio, la que fué jurada con inusitada solemnidad el 4 del mes siguiente. Conforme a las disposiciones constitucionales, el Partido de Sonsonate quedó desde entonces comprendido en la jurisdicción de El Salvador” (page 75).

Herrera 2005:  “El Congreso nombró un poder ejecutivo y, en junio de ese año, ya tenía lista la Constitución del nuevo Estado” (page 922).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 12—La Asamblea Constituyente del Estado del Salvador, divide en cuatro departamentos el territorio comprendido en la antigua demarcación de la provincia del mismo nombre y Alcaldía mayor de Zonzonate que, de hecho, quedó unida á aquel Estado, entre tanto se verificaba la división del territorio de la República según se previno en el artículo 7 de la Constitución federal.  Dichos departamentos divididos en 20 distritos ó partidos, conservaron la denominación de sus respectivas cabeceras que lo fueron, San Salvador, Zonzonate, San Vicente y San Miguel” (pages 19-20).

July

Marure 1895:  “Julio 4—Se promulgó y juró solemnemente la Constitución política del Estado del Salvador, decretada por su Asamblea Constituyente en 12 de junio anterior” (page 20).

September

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 14, 1824—“El Estado de El Salvador elige como Jefe Supremo al señor don Juan Vicente Villacorta y Vice Jefe a don Mariano Prado” (page 127).

Soto Gómez 2005:  “Cuando la Constitución de la República de 1824 se puso en vigencia, fueron convocadas las primeras elecciones para Presidente y Vice-presidente de El Salvador” (page 55).

Vidal 1970: Election for chief and vice chief of Province of El Salvador.  Gives name of successful candidates (page 154). 

October

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Mariano Prado gobernó…como Jefe Político:  1o de octubre al 13 de diciembre de 1824” (page 21).

November

Bonilla 2000:  La Asamblea “aprobó la Constitución Popular Representativa y Federal el 22 de noviembre de 1824” (page 52).

Ching 1997:  The 1824 constitution of the United Provinces of Central America “established popular elections as the method of transferring political power and separated the government into three branches, legislative, executive and judicial.  On the other hand, the charter limited mass participation in government by making all elections indirect, a tactic adapted from Spain’s Cádiz Constitution of 1812.  In indirect elections, voters cast their votes not for their political officials, but of ‘electores’ (delegates) who would then vote on their behalf.  The distance between the common voter and the candidates increased with the importance of the election…(I)n elections for such offices as President, Vice President and Representatives to the Federal Congress, the selection of electores occurred in three rounds” (page 49).

Llanes 1995:  The “Asamblea Nacional Constituyente…issued a constitution on 22 November 1824.  The constitution declared that the religion of the republic was Roman Catholicism and prohibited the public exercise of any other religion” (page 38).

Marure 1895:  El “Congreso terminó sus sesiones el 23 de noviembre del mismo año de 24, después de haber decretado la primera Constitución política de aquel ‘Estado’” (page 17).

White 1973:  “In November 1824 the Assembly renamed the state the Federal Republic of Central America and promulgated a federal constitution.  The five states were each to have their own legislatures and executives (‘heads of states’) while the Federation was to have a Congress and a President” (page 64).

Wortman 1982:  “In December 1824 Central America appeared to be unified by liberal regimes under Salvadoran hegemony.  But the unification was a mirage, more the reflection of a common position held by diverse families against rival towns and families than a feeling of national community.  All feared Guatemala, and few were willing to give up their power to the central government” (page 236).

December

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Juan Vicente Villacorta (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Supremo del 13 de diciembre de 1824 al 1o de noviembre de 1826…Fue el primer Gobernante electo por el pueblo” (page 25).

Marure 1895:  “Diciembre 13—Entra al ejercicio del Poder Ejecutivo, como primer Jefe del Estado del Salvador el señor Juan Vicente Villacorta” (page 25).

1825

Llanes 1995:  “The pope, in 1825, decreed illegitimate the acts of the Salvadorian legislature.  The same year a number of the local clergy who did not recognize Delgado as their bishop were expelled from El Salvador and went to reside in Guatemala” (page 40).

January

Marure 1895:  “Después de diez y nueve meses de trabajos, la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente cerró sus sesiones el 23 de enero de 1825” (page 10).  “Enero 30—Se instaló la primera Legislatura ordinaria del Estado del Salvador bajo la presidencia del señor José Antonio Ximénez” (page 26).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 30, 1825—“Se instala la primera Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador” (page 133).

March-April

Figeac 1938:  “Corriendo el mes de abril de 1825 y estando sentadas las bases constitucionales de la Federación Centroamericana, se convocó a los ciudadanos para que eligieran en los comicios públicos al presidente y vice-presidente de la nueva República...A las urnas electorales se presentaron los partidos liberal y conservador, postulando para presidente de la Federación a las personas de sus simpatías.  Por el partido liberal se lanzó la candidatura de don Manuel José Arce, y por el otro partido adversario, la del ciudadano José Cecilio del Valle; pero ni una ni otra obtuvieron mayoría absoluta de votos, por lo que fue preciso eligiera la Asamblea Nacional al presidente y vice-presidente de la nación centroamericana” (pages 78-79).  Describes the election and the aftermath.

Herrera 2005:  “Arce fue elegido como el primer presidente federal, el 21 de abril de 1824, y tomó posesión de su cargo el 29 de ese mismo mes” (pages 925-926).

Karnes 1976:  “The important task of electing the first president occupied the Central Americans early in 1825…A potential electoral vote of eighty-two had reached only seventy-nine because of complications in creating Guatemalan districts, and four other votes were nullified.  Valle led forty-one to thirty-four out of the seventy-five resulting.  Since the consitution required an absolute majority, the question then arose as to whether Valle’s forty-one should be based upon the authorized eighty-two votes or upon the actual seventy-nine cast” (page 56).  Following a “deal” made by Arce, “the congress announced that Valle lacked a majority, and the election was in its hands.  By a congressional vote of twenty-two to five Manuel José Arce thus became the first president of Central America” (page 57).

White 1973:  “(T)he sway of the Federal authorities, whose seat was first established at Guatemala City, was not peacefully accepted in the whole of Central America for more than a few months after the end of the Constituent Assembly and the election of the first President, the Salvadorean Arce, in April 1825.  Arce attempted to bring liberals and conservatives together and to impose strong central control on the states” (pages 64-65).

Woodward 1985:  “Central American Liberals…won, by the barest of margins and amid cries of fraud, the election of 1825.  They had controlled the government since July 1823, and even before the election they had abolished slavery and noble titles, limited the monopolies, enacted a generous immigration law, and adopted the federal Constitution of 1824.  Now, under the leadership of Manuel José Arce, they embarked on a bold revolutionary program which alarmed the Conservatives, who were led by Mariano Aycinena and José del Valle” (page 94).

Wortman 1982:  “Salvadoran liberal Manuel Arce…was elected president of the federation in March 1825 when Salvador and Nicaragua threatened secession if his conservative opponent were chosen” (pages 247-248).

April

Marure 1895:  “Abril 24—Tomó posesión con el carácter de primer Obispo electo del Salvador, el Presbítero Dr. Matías Delgado, y comenzó en tal concepto á gobernar la nueva Diócesis.  Este paso y los demás que ya se habían dado sobre este asunto…dieron origen al cisma que por algún tiempo tuvo dividido al clero de Centro-América y contribuyó á encender la guerra civil que despedazó á los Estados del Salvador y Guatemala durante los años de 27, 28 y 29” (page 28).

1826

Bonilla 2000a: “Al inaugurar su gobierno Manuel José Arce fue saboteado por sus opositores estallando, en 1826, una cruenta guerra civil que ocuparía, prácticamente, 74 años del siglo XIX” (page 81).

Woodward 1985:  “Recognizing the impossibility of immediate transformation of the economy and society, and facing the reality of considerable Conservative strength, moderates led by President Arce himself soon defected from the Liberals.  This resulted in Conservative control of the federal and Guatemalan government in 1826, but it also sparked a bloody civil war.  The Liberals found a leader in Francisco Morazán…El Salvador was near rebellion over the efforts of Ramón Casaus y Torres, the Conservative Archbishop of Guatemala, to block appointment of Liberal José Matías Delgado as Bishop of El Salvador” (page 95).

Wortman 1982:  “Most of Central America maintained a tenuous peace from 1823 until late 1826.  Except for Nicaragua, no area was strong enough to challenge the stability imposed by the alliance of liberals in Salvador, Tegucigalpa, and Guatemala…This stability was shattered in 1826 when the central government tried to regain its prerogatives.  The provinces rebelled, and for two years Central America fought, destroying the land, razing farms, and interrupting commerce…As regional families fought over disputes the crown had mediated, heretofore peaceful castes and classes, who had recognized Creole and Spanish authority, resorted to violence and rebellion to improve their position” (page 246).

October

Marure 1895:  “Octubre 10—El Presidente Arce, de propia autoridad, convoca para la villa de Cojutepeque, en el Estado del Salvador, un Congreso Nacional extraordinario, plenamente autorizado para restablecer el orden constitucional en la República” (page 36).

November

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Mariano Prado…gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  1o noviembre de 1826 al 30 enero de 1829” (page 21).  “El 1o de noviembre de 1826, el Presidente Villacorta renunció su alto cargo, entregando el Mando Supremo al Vice-Jefe de entonces don Mariano Prado” (page 25).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 1826—“(E)l Jefe Supremo don Juan Vicente Villacorta renuncia, haciéndose cargo del mando supremo el Vice Jefe don Mariano Prado” (page 159).

Soto Gómez 2005:  “Villacorta dejó su cargo al Vice Jefe Mariano Prado, por motivos de salud, el 1 de noviembre de 1826 y pocos meses después falleció…Como don Juan Vicente Villacorta fue electo para un período de cuatro años y sólo ejerció dos, don Mariano Prado completó el período constitucional y llegó en el mando hasta 1828” (page 56).

Taplin 1972:   Mariano Prado assumes chief authority for El Salvador following the resignation of Villacorta on November 1, 1826 (page 96).

December

Marure 1895:  El “decreto que expidió el Gobierno del Salvador en 6 de diciembre del mismo año [invitó] á los Diputados federales para que concurriesen á la villa de Ahuachapán.  Así quedó eludida la reunión de Cojutepeque” (page 36).

1827

Bonilla 2000a:  “1827.  El ejército salvadoreño invade Guatemala para derrocar a Manuel José Arce; los invasores fueron derrotados.  El Salvador desconoce al gobierno federal.  Sonsonate y Santa Ana se separan de El Salvador, reconociendo únicamente al gobierno federal hasta la conclusión de la guerra en 1829” (page 110).

March

Figeac 1938:  “En marzo de 1827, en el mismo mes en que los conservadores Aycinena y Córdova tomaron el mando del Estado guatemalteco, invadió Trigueros [de orden del mandatario de El Salvador] el territorio de Guatemala” (page 81).

Herrera 2005:  “De hecho, Mariano Aycinena había asumido la jefatura del Estado de Guatemala, el 1 de marzo de 1827, y con él los ‘serviles’ se consolidaron en el poder estatal y federal” (page 926).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 23—El ejército salvadoreño que se había aproximado á la capital de Guatemala, con intento, según decían sus jefes, de reponer á las autoridades disueltas en Quezaltenango, sufre en la inmediaciones de la hacienda de ‘Arrazola’ una completa derrota, causada por las tropas de la guarnición que mandaba en personal el Presidente de la República señor Manuel José Arce” (page 40).

Woodward 1985:  “By 1827 bitter fighting raged around the Guatemalan-Salvadoran border” (page 95).

May

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 18—El Presidente de la República, á la cabeza de más de 2,000 hombres de toda arma, ataca la plaza de San Salvador…, pero después de cinco horas de combate es rechazado con gran pérdida y obligado á evacuar todo el territorio salvadoreño” (page 42).

White 1973:  Arce “only succeeded in becoming closely aligned with the Guatemalan conservatives and leading them in a civil war against the liberals, who were concentrated in El Salvador:  he commanded the first, unsuccessful, attack on San Salvador in May 1827” (page 65).

December

Marure 1895:  “Diciembre 17—En las calles de la ciudad de Santa Ana, las fuerzas salvadoreñas…y las de Guatemala…se dan un sangriento combate que se terminó por una capitulación en virtud de la cual ambas fuerzas debían evacuar la plaza al siguiente día…Con este combate finalizó la segunda campaña entre salvadoreños y guatemaltecos” (page 44).

1828

Bonilla 2000a: “1828.  El gobierno federal ocupa San Salvador…Francisco Morazán apoya al gobierno salvadoreño…y derrota a las fuerzas federales” (page 110).

March

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 1o—Batalla de Chalchuapa.  El ejército de Guatemala…obtiene…una victoria completa sobre el ejército salvadoreño…Con esta acción…se abrió la tercera campaña entre Guatemala y El Salvador” (pages 45-46).

September

Marure 1895:  “Septiembre 20—Contrasitiados, en el pueblo de Mejicanos, los restos del ejército federal que había asediado la plaza de San Salvador por el espacio de ocho meses, tienen que rendirse por capitulación” (page 47).

October

Figeac 1938:  “El 23 de octubre hizo su ingreso a la capital salvadoreña el general [Francisco] Morazán y desde entonces se concretó a preparar una expedición contra el gobierno guatemalteco, pareciendo que todo arreglo de paz fuera menospreciado por este auxiliar de El Salvador y por don Mariano Prado” (page 92).

November

Bonilla 2000a: “Mariano Prado había culminado su periodo de Gobierno y no daba señales de convocar a elecciones.  Cuando las convocó, el 8 de noviembre de 1828, y se dio cuenta que José Antonio Cañas tenía mas votos las suspendió” (page 103).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 8, 1828—“El Vice Jefe del Estado de El Salvador ciudadano Mariano Prado convoca a elecciones del Jefe Supremo y Vice Jefe del Estado de El Salvador y de representantes a la Asamblea Legislativa” (page 191).

December

Leistenschneider 1980:  Antonio José Cañas “fué a elecciones y alcanzó la mayoría de votos para Presidente de El Salvador, pero sus votos fueron anulados por el Gobierno de entonces don Mariano Prado” (page 55).

Monterey 1977:  Diciembre 4, 1828—“El Vice Jefe Mariano Prado al saber que no tenía votos en las elecciones de las Autoridades Supremas que se estaban practicando y que el que obtenía la mayoría era el Coronel Antonio José Cañas, ordena la suspensión de las elecciones...Diciembre 5, 1828—La opinión pública manifestada en varias actas municipales y secundada por la prensa, piden que se cumpla el artículo 46 de la Constitución del Estado de El Salvador, el cual previene que el Jefe Supremo del Estado sólo puede ser electo por cuatro años.  La dictadura del Vice Jefe Prado, parecía ya demasiado larga...Diciembre 30, 1828—La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador declaró que el Vice Jefe en ejercicio del Mando Supremo, ciudadano Mariano Prado, ya había concluído su período desde el veinte y cuatro de septiembre y dió las providencias convenientes para las nuevas elecciones” (page 192).

1829

Figeac 1938:  “Por estos días se supo que en la Antigua se habían pronunciado algunos ciudadanos a favor de la causa que sustentaba Morazán, que no era otra entonces que la de deponer a las autoridades conservadoras establecidas en Guatemala.  Aprovechando este incidente, se operó la invasión del territorio guatemalteco por las fuerzas salvadoreñas...(A)uxilió Morazán a los rebeldes antigüeños, logrando restablecer el gobierno del Estado, conforme ellos lo deseaban” (page 93).

January

Bonilla 2000a:  “En las elecciones del 22 de enero de 1829, José María Cornejo…resultó electo Jefe de Estado; y como Vicejefe Nicolás Espinoza…[Prado] fue derrotado en las elecciones” (page 104).

Figeac 1938:  “En el Estado de El Salvador se habían verificado elecciones de miembros del Poder Ejecutivo, por lo que desde el mes de enero venía desempeñando la jefatura el ciudadano don José María Cornejo, de acuerdo con la voluntad del pueblo salvadoreño” (page 95).  “Receloso e intransigente el jefe del Estado de El Salvador, señor Cornejo, hostilizó por todos los medios posibles a los liberales que estaban bajo su jurisdicción” (page 96).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don José María Cornejo (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Supremo del 30 enero de 1829 al 16 de febrero de 1830” (page 27).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1829—“El Congreso Legislativo del Estado de El Salvador declara nulas las elecciones de Jefe Supremo del Estado recaída en el ciudadano Coronel Antonio José Cañas, por no ser el Poder Ejecutivo el competente para convocar elecciones.  El Congreso…convoca a elecciones de Jefe Supremo y Vice Jefe del Estado…Enero 22, 1829—En El Salvador fueron electos Jefe Supremo del Estado don José María Cornejo y Vice Jefe el Lic. Don Nicolás Espinoza…Enero 30, 1829—Toma posesión del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador el ciudadano José María Cornejo” (page 195).

Taplin 1972: Prado resigns as chief of El Salvador, January 22, 1829 (page 96).

Vidal 1970: “En 1829 había sido electo Jefe del Estado de El Salvador don José María Cornejo” (page 193).

April

Figeac 1938:  “El 13 de abril entró victorioso el general Morazán a la capital guatemalteca” (page 94).  “La ocupación de la ciudad de Guatemala por las tropas salvadoreñas que comandaba el general Francisco Morazán, propició un cambio radical en la política centroamericana: fue convocada la Asamblea Constituyente disuelta en 1826, con el objeto de que se encargara de reorganizar la Federación sobre bases constitucionales” (page 95).

Llanes 1995:  “The Conservative party had a strong alliance in the conservative part of the clergy, especially in the person of Archbishop Casaus.  The tension ran so high between Liberals and Conservatives that in 1829, after the end of two years of civil war when Liberals gained control of the federation, Archbishop Casaus and 429 friars were accused of treason and expelled from Central America” (pages 40-41).

Woodward 1985:  “Following their victory in 1929, the Liberals dealt vindictively with their enemies.  They imprisoned or exiled the Conservative leaders and granted the state governments extraordinary powers to deal with all who opposed the Liberal regimes” (page 95).

June

Figeac 1938:  “(P)ara que el poder público quedara completamente bajo el control del partido liberal, la Representación Nacional emitió un decreto del 25 de junio de 1829, nombrando presidente interino de la Federación al patriota don José Francisco Barrundia” (page 95).

Monterey 1977:  Junio 12, 1829—“El Lic. Nicolás Espinoza renuncia del empleo de Vice Jefe del Estado” (page 202).

August

Ingersoll 1972:  “Agitation by the states over proportional representation in the Federal Congress had led the newly constituted body, in a decree of August 2, 1829, to set up representation as follows:  Guatemala—17 deputies, El Salvador—9, Honduras and Nicaragua—6 each, and Costa Rica—2.  Since this was reform in name only, and did not solve the problem of the overwhelming power given to Guatemala, agitation for constitutional reform continued to grow, again led by El Salvador” (page 16).

Monterey 1977:  Agosto 18, 1829—“El Congreso Federal decreta convocando a las elecciones de todos los Diputados al Congreso, de todos los miembros del Senado, [y] del Presidente y Vice Presidente de la República” (page 205).  Agosto 24, 1829—“La Asamblea Legislativa declara electo popularmente al ciudadano Lic. Damián Villacorta como Vice-Jefe del Estado de El Salvador; esta elección se efectuó por haber renunciado el Vice-Jefe Lic. Nicolás Espinoza” (page 206).

1830

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 16 de febrero de 1830 don José María Cornejo entrega el Mando Supremo al Licenciado don José Damián Villacorta” (page 27).  “Licenciado José Damián Villacorta (salvadoreño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe del 16 de febrero al 4 de diciembre de 1830” (page 29).

March

Figeac 1938:  “El 27 de marzo de 1830 convocó el Congreso federal a los pueblos de la República, para que procedieran a elegir al presidente y vice-presidente de la Federación; y, en esa virtud, salieron designados para el desempeño de tales magistraturas, el general don Francisco Morazán y el patriota salvadoreño don Mariano Prado, quienes comenzaron a ejercer sus funciones desde el 16 de septiembre” (page 97).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(H)ubo un Decreto Legislativo, en marzo de 1830, ordenando la extinción de las órdenes religiosas en el Estado de El Salvador…Declaró pertenecer al Estado todos los conventos” (page 29).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 1o—Se decretó en el Estado de El Salvador la extinción de los conventos de regulares” (page 59).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 27, 1830—“Se instala en la ciudad de Guatemala el Congreso Federal y convoca a los pueblos para elegir al Presidente y Vice-Presidente Federal” (page 212)

June

Monterey 1977:  June 1830—“El Congreso Federal, por no haber mayoría absoluta de votos, declara electo Presidente de Centro América al ciudadano General Francisco Morazán y como Vicepresidente al ciudadano Mariano Prado” (page 121).

September

Ingersoll 1972:  “As one of his first acts after assuming the presidency in September, 1830, General Morazán began pressure to move the federal capital from its seat in Guatemala City to San Salvador.  He felt uncomfortable in the hostile atmosphere in Guatemala City and regarded the area as more exposed to Conservative retaliation from Mexico…Unfortunately, however, the Salvadorean assembly did not agree with the president.  In addition to both localist and conservative sentiment in the government, the legislators feared potential political strains arising from the federal capital being in their state capital and, even more, feared the economic cost to El Salvador of such a dual situation” (page 12).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 16, 1830—“El General Francisco Morazán, toma posesión de la Presidencia de la República de Centro América, en la ciudad de Guatemala” (page 213).

December

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don José María Cornejo (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo del 4 de diciembre de 1830 al 3 de abril de 1832…El 4 de diciembre de 1830 el Vice-Jefe del Estado de El Salvador don José Damián Villacorta entrega el Mando Supremo a don José María Cornejo” (page 27).

1831

Bonilla 2000a:  “1831.  Se instala en San Salvador la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado.  Insurrección en San Salvador contra las autoridades del Estado” (page 110).

Karnes 1976:  “In 1831 a well coordinated plan was initiated to annihilate the Liberal party.  From his asylum in Mexico former President Arce…plotted with the new chief of El Salvador, José María Cornejo, against the federal authorities” (page 76).

White 1973:  In 1831 “José María Cornejo, who had been elected in 1829, turned toward the conservatives; this change may well have been due to fear of Guatemala hegemony, which at this time, exceptionally, had a liberal guise” (page 70).

February

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 7—A la una de la tarde hubo un gran terremoto en El Salvador que causó notables estragos en la capital del Estado y muchas de las poblaciones situadas sobre la costa del Sur” (page 63).  “Febrero 16—Se concede al pueblo de Chalatenango, en el Estado de El Salvador, el título de ‘villa’” (page 64).

December

Ingersoll 1972:  “President Morazán, in a decree of December 20, 1831, designated San Salvador as the federal capital and began his journey to the new seat of government.  The government of El Salvador announced he would not be permitted to enter the state.  In reply, Morazán [issued] a proclamation stating his motives for moving the capital to San Salvador” (page 12).  These included the fact that “the federal legislature was dominated by Guatemalans, both because of proportional representation and because the ‘suplentes’ (substitutes, when the elected legislator could not arrive at the seat of government) of the other states, simply because of convenience and proximity, were Guatemalans.  Simply, moving the capital to San Salvador would be a major step in trimming Guatemala’s excessive power.  He directed his ideas at El Salvador, because the tiny state had been the most vocal in complaining of Guatemalan abuses and in refusing to accede to federal decrees” (page 13).

Monterey 1977:  Diciembre 20, 1831—“El Presidente Federal General Francisco Morazán decreta el traslado de las autoridades federales al Estado de El Salvador” (page 216).

Wortman 1982:  “Morazán and [Guatemalan governor] Gálvez organized a federal government, called a federal congress composed almost exclusively of Guatemalans, and created a federal district of the city of Salvador, without the approval of the ruling Salvadorans” (page  261).

1832

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1832 uprisings throughout the Federated States of El Salvador and Guatemala inaugurated a surge in popular revolts and political instability that continued for a half century.  These popular mobilizations began when El Salvador’s head of state, Mariano Prado, tried to enforce a series of unpopular laws…Riots in the mostly Indian neighborhoods of San Salvador ultimately led to larger revolts and conspiracies” (pages 105-106).

Llanes 1995:  “’Criollos’ used Indian and ‘ladino’ armies in the continuous state of war in the region, and used each against the other when facing insurrection by either group.  In 1832, ‘ladinos’ in El Salvador protested new taxes, and Indian armies were used to put down the insurrection.  In reaction, the ‘ladino’ population of San Miguel attacked the Indian garrison and killed most of the Indian soldiers.  Indians reacted with violence against these kinds of abuses” (page 63).

Taplin 1972:  El Salvador secedes from the federation on January 7, 1832.  Morazán enters San Salvador, deposes Cornejo on April 3, 1832, and sends him to Guatemala under guard.  Prado (who had been elected vice-president of the federation on March 27, 1830) resigns his office and reassumes the duties of chief executive of El Salvador (pages 96-97).

Tilley 2005:  “In 1832, popular revolts against the new federal taxes rocked a number of towns in the region including Zacatecoluca and Izalco” (page 115).

January

Ingersoll 1972:  “On January 7, 1832, [El Salvador] seceded from the federation and announced the federal pact was dissolved until all the states could meet to consider mutual security and reforms to the constitution.  The federal Congress promptly declared El Salvador in ‘a state of rebellion’” (page 13). 

Karnes 1976:  “In the face of threatened invasion by Morazán, Cornejo ordered him to leave El Salvador, and the state seceded from the federal union” (pages 76-77).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En enero de 1832 el General Francisco Morazán con su ejército ocupó la ciudad de Santa Ana, por ese motivo la Asamblea Legislativa decreta declarando suspenso el pacto nacional” (pages 27-28).

Marure 1895:  “Enero 7—La Asamblea del Estado de El Salvador declara suspenso el pacto federativo y desconoce á las autoridades de la República.  Consiguiente con este acuerdo, el Jefe de aquel Estado hace regresar de Santa Ana al Presidente de la República, que el 29 del mismo mes, y acompañado de sus Ministros, había salido de Guatemala para trasladarse á la capital de El Salvador” (pages 66-67).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 2, 1832—“Proclama del Presidente Federal, General Francisco Morazán,…en la cual hace saber que la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, le ordena suspender su marcha hacia la ciudad de San Salvador, amenazándolo con expulsarlo si llega.  El viaje tenía por objeto trasladar a San Salvador la Capital Federal…Enero 7, 1832—La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador emite decreto declarando suspenso el pacto nacional; desconoce las autoridades federales y assume la soberanía” (page 218).

February

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1832—“En la ciudad de Guatemala el Congreso Federal declara ilegítimas las autoridades del Estado de El Salvador” (page 218).

March

Bonilla 2000a:  “Morazán tomó San Salvador en medio de una gran batalla, el 28 de marzo de 1832.  Inmediatamente colocó a Prado como Jefe de Estado y regresó a Guatemala” (page 105).

Figeac 1938:  “Luego que el general Morazán desalojó del poder al impopular don José María Cornejo, ordenó la emisión de un decreto convocando a elecciones a los salvadoreños, para cubrir la vacante” (page 99).

Ingersoll 1972:  “President Morazán raised an army of Honduran, Nicaraguan, and Guatemalan troops and, after a small resistance, entered San Salvador on March 28” (page 14).

Karnes 1976:  “By March, 1832, the Federalists had everywhere won.  Arce was defeated and driven back to Mexico…Morazán’s army took San Salvador and brought the secession to a close” (page 77).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El el mes de marzo de 1832 hubo sublevación en Chalatenango contra el Jefe Supremo don José María Cornejo y en favor del Gobierno Federal” (page 28).

Marure 1895:  “Marzo 28—El Presidente de la República, General F. Morazán, ocupa á viva fuerza la plaza de San Salvador; hace, en seguida, poner presas á todas las personas que ejercían los Supremos Poderes de aquel Estado y las remite escoltadas á Guatemala para que allí fuesen juzgadas” (page 69).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 29, 1832—“El General Francisco Morazán ataca la plaza de San Salvador…Fueron capturados el Jefe Supremo del Estado, don José María Cornejo, sus Ministros de Estado, [y] la mayoría de los Miembros de la Asamblea Legislativa…El General Morazán declara que asume provisionalmente el Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, y convoca a elecciones de Autoridades Supremas del Estado” (page 220).

April

Figeac 1938:  “Don Mariano Prado salió victorioso en las urnas electorales, como jefe del Estado, y don Joaquín San Martín como vice-jefe” (page 99).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 3 de abril de 1832 el General Francisco Morazán depone al Jefe Supremo don José María Cornejo; y envía escoltados presos para Guatemala a don José María Cornejo, al Prócer Antonio José Cañas, Ministros de Estado, la mayoría de los miembros de la Asamblea Legislativa, los Magistrados de la Corte Suprema de Justicia y como sesenta personas más…Permanecieron cerca de un año en prisión.  Don José María Cornejo fue el Primer Jefe de Estado depuesto por el General Morazán.  El 3 de abril de 1832 asumió el Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador el General Francisco Morazán” (page 28).  “General Francisco Morazán (hondureño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  3 Abril al 13 de Mayo de 1832” (page 47).

Marure 1895:  Morazán “expidió un decreto con fecha 3 de abril siguiente, declarando que reasumía en su persona el Gobierno del Estado entre tanto se reorganizaban sus autoridades constitucionales” (page 69).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 3, 1832—“Fueron electos popularmente Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador don Mariano Prado y Vice-Jefe el Coronel don Joaquín San Martín” (page 220).

Soto Gómez 2005:  “Morazán fue Presidente del 3 de abril al 13 de mayo de 1832, cuando derrocó a don José María Cornejo, a quien mandó encadenado junto a su gabinete de gobierno a Guatemala.  40 días después entregó el poder al Coronel Joaquín San Martín” (page 61).

May

Karnes 1976:  “In May of 1832 complete religious freedom was declared by congress and the states…These reforms had but slight theological importance.  The Liberals themselves were primarily Catholics and not fighting for the right to introduce other denominations.  Their purpose was simply to weaken the secular position of the church in Central American affairs” (pages 72-73).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Coronel Joaquín de San Martín (hondureño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe:  13 de Mayo al 25 de Julio de 1832” (page 31).

Llanes 1995:  “The federal congress adopted a policy of religious toleration on 2 May 1832, proclaiming that all the inhabitants of the republic were free to worship God according to their conscience and were protected by the federal government in the eexercise of such freedom.  This law had no real effect upon the people since no other religious expression apart from Catholicism existed in the Central American republic” (page 39).

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 2—El Congreso federal de Centro-América decreta la ‘Tolerancia de cultos,’ declarando que todos los habitantes de la República son libres para adorar á Dios según su conciencia” (page 70).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 13, 1832—“En la ciudad de San Salvador se instala la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado…La Asamblea declara popularmente electos, como Jefe Supremo a don Mariano Prado y como Vice-Jefe al Coronel Joaquín San Martín” (page 221).

July

Domínguez Sosa 2007:  “Durante la administración de Prado, la anarquía se agudiza.  La insurrección cunde por todos los rumbos del solar cuscatleco.  Los factores principales de las sediciones, fueron el fanatismo popular, los empréstitos forzosos y los nuevos impuestos decretados por el Gobierno para aliviar la miseria fiscal. También influye en esto los reclutamientos de tropa” (pages 115-116).

Figeac 1938:  “El señor Prado tuvo que renunciar la vice-presidencia de la Federación, para poder aceptar y protestar su nuevo cargo; su renuncia le fue admitida por el Congreso federal y ya libre de tal compromiso, principió a ejercer sus elevadas funciones en julio de 1832, después de dos meses de interinato del vice-jefe San Martín” (page 99).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Mariano Prado (nicaragüense) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  25 de julio de 1832 al 9 de febrero de 1833” (page 21).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 25, 1832—“El ciudadano don Mariano Prado toma posesión del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, el cual había asumido el veinte y nueve de marzo el General Francisco Morazán” (page 221).

August

Figeac 1938:  “(L)a Asamblea del Estado emitió el decreto de 21 de agosto, mandando establecer una contribución anual, directa y general, pagadera sobre la propiedad y empleos de los habitantes del país, sin exceptuar a los súbditos extranjeros” (page 100).

White 1973:  “Another cause of discontent at the time was that in 1832 the state government had introduced new taxes in order to supplement the income it received, most of which had come, until then, from the liquor monopoly.  The treasury had been exhausted in part by a new war against the Federal government” (page 73).

October

Browning 1971:  “(T)he Nonualco Indians, having retained a large degree of tribal unity, saw the turbulent times as their hour of deliverance and sought to re-establish their own independent homeland that had been so persistently intruded upon over the past three centuries.  Between October 1832 and January 1833, they rose against the Government under their leader, Anastasio Aquino, proclaimed their political independence, and won control over a wide area between San Vicente and Zacatecoluca before being subdued by force” (page 142).

Figeac 1938:  “La ola de la indignación popular se fue inflamando poco a poco y en la noche del 24 de octubre se estrelló con pavoroso estrépito en las rocas del poder público.  Esa noche se levantó el pueblo sansalvadoreño en abierta pugna contra las autoridades gubernativas, y al jefe Prado no le quedó otro recurso...que trasladar su gobierno a Cojutepeque” (page 100).

Marure 1895:  “Octubre 24—Estalló en San Salvador una sublevación contra el Jefe del Estado señor Mariano Prado.  La exacción de una contribución directa que había decretado la Legislatura en 21 de agosto del mismo año, fue el motivo ostensible del levantamiento” (page 73).

November

Llanes 1995:  Matías “Delgado died 12 November 1832, and with him died a Liberal movement within the Catholic church” (page 40).  “After his death the Salvadorian church was headed by the Conservative wing of the church and became conservative in its whole” (page 41).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 1832—“Sublevación de los Izalcos, quienes atacan Sonsonate y la saquean…Sublevación de San Vicente y Santiago Nonualco…En San Miguel ocurren motines y sublevaciones contra el Gobierno del Jefe Supremo del Estado, don Mariano Prado” (page 226).

White 1973:  “Insurrections occurred in October and November in several towns, including the capital.  These probably involved mainly ‘ladinos,’ but Indian troops were used to put them down.  This forced recruitment of Indians for the army, to fight battles in which they had no interest, was another of the main grievances which led to the uprising of the Nonualcos” (page 73).

December

Figeac 1938:  “(E)l gobierno de Prado retornó a San Salvador el 10 de diciembre” (page 100).

White 1973:  “At the end of December 1832 a force of just over a hundred Indians from Santiago Nonualco and San Juan Nonualco formed the garrison maintained by the government in the city of San Miguel, which was hostile, having been the scene of one of the November insurrections” (page 73).

1833

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “A new uprising in San Salvador forced Chief of State Prado out of office. As a result of these revolts, the National Assemby eliminated the hated taxes.  The new chief of state, Joaquín San Martín, then decreed an amnesty, but more than opposition to new taxes was at stake” (page 106).

Taplin 1972: Joaquin San Martin y Ulloa assumes office when Prado resigns February 9, 1833; he is elected to office July 1, 1833 (page 97).

January

McElhinny 2006:  “Indigo, the first Salvadoran export crop, and the indigenous forced labor that it required were the ingredients of the first major agrarian revolt in January 1833…Accumulated grievances combined to spur Anastacio Aquino to lead a largely indigenous army of about 2,000 Nonualcos on a brief campaign that resulted in the sacking of the provincial capital of San Vicente.  Independence and the ensuing regional wars eliminated what few protections that indigenous people had under Spanish rule.  Finance of regional wars forced a restoration of tribute on indigenous communities.  Communal resources continued to be confiscated and indigenous conscripts were forced to defend state property from frequent ladino tax revolts” (page 139).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1833—“Insurrección de los pueblos indígenas, Santiago y San Juan Nonualco, acaudillados por el indio Anastasio Aquino” (page 229).

Tilley 2005:  “Ethnopolitical tensions were…already explosive when, in January of 1833, a local hacienda owner locked Aquino’s brother in the hacienda’s stocks.  Aquino and some friends attacked the hacienda to free him, and the incident catalyzed a mass uprising” (page 115).

White 1973:  “Tension gradually rose between the Indians of the [San Miguel] garrison and the ‘ladino’ population of the city, and culminated in an organized attack on the Indians on 3 and 4 January 1833, and the death of most of the Indians.  The rebellion of Anastasio Aquino began in Santiago Nonualco soon after news of this event must have reached there” (page 73).  Describes the rebellion.

February

Bonilla 2000a:  “La imposición de Mariano Prado quebró la política pluralista participativa que había mantenido El Salvador…(P)ronto Prado tuvo que dejar el poder, presionado por una insurrección provocada por los constantes impuestos que demandaba la guerra.  El vicejefe, Joaquín de San Martín, tuvo que asumir el poder en un momento muy delicado, y la política salvadoreña comenzó a ser dominada por las facciones que pronto fueron imponiendo la anarquía” (page 106).

El Salvador: background to the crisis 1982:  “(T)he Salvadoran landholding elite, now unrestrained by the Spanish crown, felt free to seize Indian lands…In response, the first major opposition to the landed gentry arose in 1833, during the Indian rebellion led by Anastasio Aquino.  Aquino’s month-long rebellion was a fight for social justice in which poor ‘ladinos’ (non-Indians)  joined with Indians in what was then referred to as the ‘Army of Liberation’ to fight against rich ‘ladinos’ and ‘criollos’” (page 12).

Ingersoll 1972:  “At the same time the whites were starting another of their internecine quarrels, a widespread, brutal, and terrifying Indian revolt began in the Indian towns of Santiago Nonualco, Izalco, and Nahuizalco, led by the Indian Messiah, Anastacio Aquino, who proclaimed race war and war against the economic burdens borne by the Indians of El Salvador.  After much bloodshed, San Martín was able to crush the Indian revolt, execute Aquino, and restore some order to El Salvador” (page 15).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “A much larger uprising began in La Paz in February 1833 when Indian hacienda workers rebelled…The leader of this revolt [was] Anastasio Aquino” (page 106).  “Indian opposition to the legitimacy of white and Ladino political and military authority was key to their mobilization…The movement was defeated on February 14…This defeat was followed by harsh measures against the local population, including massive executions” (page 107).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 9 de febrero de 1833, [Mariano Prado] fue depuesto por un motín cuando el país se convulsionaba en una anarquía práctica.  Don Mariano Prado entregó el Mando Supremo al Vice-Jefe, Coronel Joaquín San Martín” (page 22).  “Coronel Joaquín de San Martín gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  9 Febrero de 1833 al 23 de Junio de 1834…El 13 de febrero de 1833, el Vice-Jefe San Martín, decreta concediendo indulto a los indios rebeldes nonualcos” (page 31).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1833—“El indio Anastasio Aquino derrota al Comandante de San Vicente…Febrero 5, 1833—El indio Anastasio Aquino toma y saquea la ciudad de Zacatecoluca” (page 231).  Febrero 8, 1833—“La Asamblea Legislativa acordó, en vista del estado anárquico del país en sus nueve meses de mando, excitar al Jefe Supremo del Estado, don Mariano Prado, para que deposite el Mando Supremo en el Vice-Jefe don Joaquín San Martín” (page 231).  Febrero 15, 1833—“El indio Aquino…entra a la abandonada ciudad de San Vicente” (pages 232-233).  Febrero 28, 1833—“El Coronel Juan José López ataca en Santiago Nonualco al indio Aquino, derrotándolo” (page 233).

March

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En marzo de 1833, el General Francisco Morazán, se une a las fuerzas revolucionarias para derrocar el Gobierno de San Martín” (page 31).

April

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En abril 6 de 1833 se firmó un Convenio entre San Martín y Morazán” (page 31).

May

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 10, 1833—“El Vice Jefe del Estado de El Salvador, don Joaquín San Martín, convoca a elecciones de Autoridades Supremas del Estado” (page 236).

June

Monterey 1977:  Junio 1833—“Se efectúan en el Estado de El Salvador las elecciones de Autoridades Supremas” (page 237).  Junio 21, 1833—“El Congreso Federal reunido en Guatemala, al tener conocimiento de que el Vice-Jefe don Joaquín San Martín había tenido mayoría de votos en las elecciones de Jefe Supremo de El Salvador, decreta, declarando inconstitucional la convocatoria a elecciones de Autoridades Supremas de El Salvador.  El Senado Federal negó su sanción a ese decreto” (page 237).

July

Figeac 1938:  El “Congreso del Estado se ocupó efectivamente de reorganizar los autoridades salvadoreñas sólo que en lugar de satisfacer la finalidad que se perseguía en los arreglos celebrados entre San Martín y Morazán, lo que hizo fue reafirmar como jefe de El Salvador al mismo San Martín, encargándole la vice-jefatura a don Lorenzo González, según decreto Legislativo de 1º de julio.  Esta decisión fue anulada por el Congreso Federal y el mismo Morazán desconoció esa situación creada por el ambicioso don Joaquín San Martín en un manifiesto” (page 109).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 1o de julio de 1833 el Congreso del Estado organizó a las autoridades Salvadoreñas:  como Jefe de Estado a San Martín y como Vice-Jefe a don Lorenzo González; esta decisión fue anulada por el Congreso Federal” (page 31).

Marure 1895:  “Julio 24—Anastasio Aquino, que había dado principio á la guerra de castas en el Estado de El Salvador, sublevando á los aborígenes de Santiago Nonualco, de donde era natural, es pasado por las armas en la ciudad de San Vicente.  Con la muerte de este cabecilla…quedó enteramente sofocada la temida insurreción de Nonualco” (page 78).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 1, 1833—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, declara popularmente electo Jefe Supremo del Estado a don Joaquín San Martín, y como Vice-Jefe a don Lorenzo González…Julio 24, 1833—Fué fusilado en la ciudad de San Vicente el indio Anastasio Aquino” (page 238).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 14, 1833—“Decreto del Vice Presidente Federal, José Gregorio Salazar, señalando la ciudad de Sonsonate para la residencia del Gobierno de las Autoridades Federales, y con el objeto de arrojar del Poder al Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, don Joaquín San Martín” (page 241).

1834

Karnes 1976:  “The numerous quarrels between states and national government served often to obscure an important factor that must be re-emphasized.  That was the old fear of Guatemala…Demands grew for the creation of a federal district outside of Guatemala; in 1834 these were acceded to by moving the administration to Sonsonate and later to San Salvador, both in the especially jealous state of El Salvador.  Coincidental with this shift were proposals to alter the constitution with the smaller states seeking, among other things, equal representation in the congress” (page 77).

January

Bonilla 2000a:  “1834.  En enero, la capital de la Federación se instala en Sonsonate” (page 112).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1834—“El Congreso Federal, al verificar el escrutinio, declara electo al ciudadano Licenciado José Cecilio del Valle, como Presidente Federal” (page 243).

February

Figeac 1938:  Morazán “fue autorizado por el Congreso de la República para trasladar la sede del gobierno de la República a Sonsonate, medida que fue cumplimentada el 12 de febrero de 1834, con la preconcebida idea de pacificar a los salvadoreños” (page 109).

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 5—Las Supremas autoridades nacionales, que desde su instalación habían residido en Guatemala, verifican su traslación á la ciudad de Zonzonate en el Estado de El Salvador…Poco tiempo permanecieron en su nueva residencia, la que abandonaron por el mes de junio del mismo año para establecerse definitivamente en la capital de El Salvador, que lo fue entonces de toda la República” (page 79).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 2, 1834—“Muere en la ciudad de Guatemala el Lic. José Cecilio del Valle, quien había sido electo Presidente de la República de Centro América” (page 244).

April

Monterey 1977:  Abril 5, 1834—“El Jefe Supremo de El Salvador, ciudadano Joaquín San Martín, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Vice-Jefe ciudadano Lorenzo González” (page 244).

May

Figeac 1938:  “Para restablecer el orden, Morazán consiguió de la Asamblea Federal la emisión del decreto de 29 de mayo de 1834, acordando el traslado de las autoridades supremas de la Federación a San Salvador, lo que fue efectuado el 16 de junio del mismo año” (page 109).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 13, 1834—“Se instala en la ciudad de Sonsonate el Congreso Federal…Mayo 29, 1834—Las Autoridades Federales acuerdan trasladarse de Sonsonate a San Salvador, noticiando esta disposición al Gobierno del Estado.  May 30, 1834—Fué asesinado…el Vice-Jefe en ejercicio del Mando Supremo, Ciudadano Lorenzo González.  El Jefe Supremo del Estado, Ciudadano Joaquín San Martín, asume Mando Supremo por la muerte del Vice-Jefe González” (page 244). 

June

Figeac 1938:  “Al ser separado don Joaquín San Martín de sus funciones gubernativas, entró a subragarlo el general don Carlos Salazar” (page 110).

Ingersoll 1972:  “President Morazán continued his attack on El Salvador and, on June 23, 1834, defeated San Martín’s forces” (page 15).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 23 de junio de 1834, San Martín entregó el gobierno al General Carlos Salazar, quien fue impuesto por el General Morazán.  Después fue condenado San Martín a dos años de destierro y a confiscación de bienes” (page 32).  “General Carlos Salazar (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  23 Junio al 13 de Julio de 1834” (page 33).

Marure 1895:  “Junio 23—Se empeñó un reñido combate en las calles de la ciudad capital de El Salvador, entre las tropas del Gobierno de aquel Estado que mandaba el Coronel José Dolores Castillo, y la guarnición federal que existía en dicha ciudad á las órdenes del General Salazar.  La refriega duró cinco horas, al cabo de las cuales la victoria se declaró a favor de los federales.  Este acontecimiento dio lugar á un nuevo cambio en la administración política del Estado del Salvador” (pages 83-84).

Monterey 1977:  Junio 2, 1834—“En Sonsonate el Congreso Federal convoca a nuevas elecciones de Presidente Federal por la muerte del Licenciado José Cecilio del Valle; elige como Vice Presidente Federal al Senador, Ciudadano José Gregorio Salazar, por falta de mayoría de votos…Junio 6, 1834—El General Francisco Morazán invade con el ejército federal y guatemalteco la ciudad de San Salvador, sin respetar al Gobierno del Estado” (page 245).  Junio 12, 1834—José Gregorio Salazar “nombra a su hermano, el General Carlos Salazar, Jefe Provisional del Estado de El Salvador…Junio 13, 1834—El Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, Ciudadano Joaquín San Martín…resuelve recobrar la plaza de San Salvador…Junio 23, 1834—(D)errotadas las fuerzas del Jefe Supremo San Martín” (page 247).

July

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don José Gregorio Salazar (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  13 de Julio al 30 de Septiembre de 1834” (page 35).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 2, 1834—“El Gobierno Provisorio de El Salvador, decreta mandando renovar todos los miembros de las Municipalidades del Estado, debiendo elegir los individuos que deben componer las Municipalidades el domingo seis de este mes” (page 247).  Julio 16, 1834—“El Presidente Federal General Francisco Morazán deposita el Mando Federal en el Senador, General José Gregorio Salazar, por haber terminado su período administrativo” (page 248).

September

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 21 de septiembre de 1834 se instaló en la ciudad de San Vicente la Asamblea del Estado de El Salvador, que fue mandada a elegir por don José Gregorio Salazar…El mismo mes de septiembre del mismo año, la Asamblea Legislativa declaró nulos los votos para elección de Jefe Supremo, Vice-Jefe y Magistrados, por encontrarles faltas legales.  El 30 de septiembre de 1834, la Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador acordó entregar el Mando Supremo de la Nación, al Consejero Joaquín Escolán y Balibrera” (page 35).  “Don Joaquín Escolán y Balibrera (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  30 Septiembre al 14 de Octubre de 1834” (page 37).

October

Figeac 1938:  “(P)racticadas las elecciones del caso, para proveer las vacantes de jefe y vice-jefe del Estado de El Salvador, los votos recayeron a favor de don Dionisio Herrera y del licenciado don José María Silva, acordándose por el Augusto Cuerpo Legislativo que el gobierno salvadoreño funcionara en la ciudad de San Vicente...Ante la sistemática actitud del renunciante, motivada al parecer por resquemores políticos, se hizo cargo de la dirección del Estado el vice-jefe licenciado don José María Silva, mientras tanto eran llamados los pueblos a nuevas elecciones” (page 110).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “(E)l mes de octubre…la Asamblea Legislativa designa la ciudad de San Vicente, para residencia de las Autoridades Supremas del Estado…El 14 de octubre de 1834 entregó la 1a Magistratura al Licenciado José María Silva” (page 37).  “Licenciado José María Silva (salvadoreño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe:  14 Octubre de 1834 al 2 de Marzo de 1835…Gobernó como Vice-Jefe por renuncia que hiciera el Jefe Supremo electo” (page 49).

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 14, 1834—“La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador, habiendo procedido a la regulación de los sufragios dados por las juntas electorales de los cuatro Departamentos, para Jefe y Vice-Jefe Supremos del Estado y por haberse declarado nulas las votaciones del Departamento de San Vicente, no hay en ellos elección popular; procedió a elegir entre los candidates, resultando electo como Jefe Supremo del Estado, el ciudadano Dionisio Herrera (pariente del General Morazán), y como Vice-Jefe el Lic. José María Silva…Ese día toma posesión del Mando Supremo, el Vice-Jefe Lic. José María Silva, por haberse negado el ciudadano Dionisio Herrera a aceptar el nombramiento que en él hizo la Asamblea Legislativa” (page 249).

1835

Bonilla 2000a:  “1835.  Por decreto del Congreso Federal, San Salvador es designada capital de la República Federal y cabecera del Distrito Federal, donde permanece hasta 1839” (page 112).

Herrera 2005:  “Los pueblos continuaron divididos entre las antiguas parcialidades de indios y ladinos…Divisiones que, en el transcurso de los años, se agravaron al tomar unos y otros partido por las diversas facciones que lucharon por el poder político estatal o se enfrentaron a las autoridades federales…Así lo manifestaban los indios del pueblo de Cojutepeque a otras poblaciones vecinas, en 1835.  Ellos vieron en el jefe de Estado de ese entonces, Nicolás Espinosa, un líder capaz de resolver sus problemas” (page 929).

Lauria Santiago 1995:  “Como parte del movimiento ligado a Espinoza, una milicia indígena dirigida por Atanacio Flores tomó varias ciudades y pueblos en la región central y norcentral de El Salvador, encontrando gran apoyo en la ciudad de Cojutepeque y en todo el departamento de Cuscatlán.  El Gobierno de la Federación tuvo que enviar tropas contra esta” (page 240).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1835 President Morazán removed General Nicolás Espinoza as chief of state after only a few months in power.  Espinoza was accused of conspiring with the Indians of the central region and their allies in Guatemala to overthrow the Federation and establish an Indian republic.  He had managed to tap into deeply felt ethnic resentments of the Indians in an attempt to gain their support” (page 108).

January

Ingersoll 1972:  “On January 28, 1835, the legislature of El Salvador moved to the new state capital at San Vicente” (page 15).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 17, 1835—“Fueron electos como Senadores del Estado de El Salvador a la Federación, los ciudadanos Mariano Prado y Diego Vigil y como suplente, el ciudadano Francisco Padilla” (page 252). 

February

Ingersoll 1972:  “(O)n February 7, 1835, San Salvador became the Federal District” (page 15).

Marure 1895:  “Febrero 7—Fue erigida en distrito federal la ciudad de San Salvador con algunos de los pueblos circunvecinos…Febrero 13—El Congreso federal decreta una nueva Constitución política para la República reformando la de 1824” (page 86).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 2, 1835—“El Congreso Federal declara reelecto popularmente al General Francisco Morazán, como Presidente de Centro América, y al General José Gregorio Salazar, como Vice Presidente, concluyendo el período el primero de febrero de 1839.  Febrero 7, 1835—El Congreso Federal, decreta:  erigiendo a la ciudad de San Salvador como Capital Federal, la que con los pueblos de su jurisdicción formará el Distrito Federal.  Febrero 14, 1835—El Presidente Federal, General Francisco Morazán…toma posesión de la Presidencia Federal” (page 253). 

March

Figeac 1938:  “Abiertos los comicios públicos y oído el parecer del gran elector, salió triunfante la candidatura del general y licenciado don Nicolás Espinosa, a quien la Asamblea puso en posesión de sus dignísimas funciones” (page 111).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 2 de marzo de 1835, por renuncia que hizo el ciudadano don Dionisio Herrera (hondureño), al nombramiento de Jefe Supremo del Estado, se le entregó el Poder al Consejero don Joaquín Escolán y Balibrera.  Gobernó como Consejero hasta el 10 de abril de 1835” (page 37).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 2, 1835—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, en vista de la reiterada renuncia que el ciudadano Dionisio Herrera ha hecho del nombramiento de Jefe Supremo del Estado, acuerda:  admitírsela y convocar a elecciones de Jefe Supremo del Estado, señalando el día quince del corriente mes para que se verifiquen…Marzo 15, 1835—Fué electo popularmente el Benemérito General Nicolás Espinoza, como Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador” (page 254).

April

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado y general Nicolás Espinoza (salvadoreño) gobernó como Jefe de Estado:  10 Abril al 15 de Noviembre de 1835” (page 39).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 6, 1835—“La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador declara popularmente electo como Jefe Supremo del Estado, al Benemérito Licenciado General Nicolás Espinoza y como Vice Jefe al Licenciado José María Silva.  Los electores fueron 103, el General Espinoza obtuvo 64…Abril 10, 1835—Toma posesión del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, el Licenciado General Nicolás Espinoza” (pages 254-255).

May

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 22—El departamento de San Salvador…comenzó desde esta fecha á denominarse departamento de ‘Cuzcatlán,’ y la ciudad de Santa Ana fue elevada al rango de capital del departamento de Zonzonate” (page 87).

September

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En septiembre de 1835, por Decreto Legislativo se erigió el Departamento de San Vicente con los Partidos de Sensuntepeque y San Vicente” (page 39).

November

Figeac 1938:  Vice jefe “Silva le hizo creer al mandatario guatemalteco que el general Espinosa intentaba promover ciertos disturbios revolucionarios en el vecino Estado, así como una lucha de castas en El Salvador...Esta noticia llegó a conocimiento del presidente de la Federación, general Francisco Morazán” (page 111).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Coronel y licenciado Francisco Gómez (costarricense) gobernó como Consejero:  15 Noviembre de 1835 al 1o de Febrero de 1836…Fue impuesto como Gobernante de El Salvador, por el General Francisco Morazán, después de deponer al Gobernante de entonces, el Licenciado y Coronel Nicolás Espinoza” (page 41).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 15, 1835—“Fué depuesto del Mando Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, el Benemérito Licenciado Coronel Nicolás Espinoza, por el General Francisco Morazán.  Este es el tercer Jefe depuesto por el General Francisco Morazán.  Asumió el Mando el Consejero, ciudadano Francisco Gómez” (page 258).

1836

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 28, 1836—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador admite la renuncia del Mando Supremo, al Lic. y General Benemérito Nicolás Espinoza y la del Vice-Jefe Lic. José María Silva” (page 259).

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  Francisco Gómez “entregó el mando Supremo el 1o de febrero de 1836, al señor Diego Vigil (pariente del General Morazán)” (page 41).  “Don Diego Vigil (hondureño) gobernó como Jefe Supremo:  1o de febrero de 1836 al 23 de mayo de 1837…Fue impuesto como Jefe Supremo de El Salvador, por el General Francisco Morazán, de quien era pariente.  Como Vice-Jefe:  don Timoteo Menéndez” (page 43).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 1836—“Se instala en San Salvador el Senado y el Congreso Federales…Marzo 7, 1836—La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, eligió al ciudadano Diego Vigil (pariente del General Morazán) ex-Jefe de Honduras, como Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador y como Vice-Jefe, al ciudadano Timoteo Menéndez” (page 259).

1837

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1837 the peasants of the Volcán de Santa Ana revolted against local and Federation authorities with the support of Guatemala’s General Carrera” (page 112).  “Other Indian villages rose up in May 1837…Although these upheavals failed to bring about a change of regime, they led to the eventual defeat of Morazán’s liberal faction by conservatives allied to Carrera in Guatemala” (page 113).

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1837—“En este mes los estragos del cólera morbus en el Estado de El Salvador se extienden por todos los pueblos” (page 262).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 13, 1837—“El Congreso Federal se declara solemnemente instalado en la ciudad capital San Salvador.  La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador, por no haber mayoría de votos en las elecciones, designa como Senadores Propietarios, a los ciudadanos Máximo Orellana y Juan Manuel Rodríguez, y como Suplente al Presbítero Mariano Antonio de Lara” (pages 264-265).

May

Lauria Santiago 1995:  “Durante mayo de 1837, cuatro mil indios cojutepeques, convencidos de que los ladinos habían envenenado las aguas del pueblo y causado una epidemia del cólera, se levantaron y tomaron el control del mismo…Junto con gente de Zacatecoluca atacaron el cuartel de esta cercana población…Unos días más tarde, con los mismos indios nonualcos atacaron el cuartel de San Vicente…Morazán envió tropas…de San Salvador para ayudar a pacificar la región” (page 240).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El día 23 de mayo de 1837, estalla una insurrección de indígenas en Zacatecoluca y Cojutepeque, robando y asesinando.  En esa misma fecha entrega [Vigil] el Supremo Poder a don Timoteo Menéndez” (page 43).  “Don Timoteo Menéndez (salvadoreño) gobernó como Vice-Jefe:  23 de Mayo al 7 de Junio de 1837” (page 45).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 23, 1837—“Una insurrección de los indígenas de Zacatecoluca y Cojutepeque, sorprenden los cuarteles de Zacatecoluca…Mayo 26, 1837—Los facciosos indígenas de Cojutepeque y los nonualcos atacan el cuartel de San Vicente…Mayo 27, 1837—(F)uerzas federales enviadas desde San Salvador reestablecen el orden y desalojan a los insurrectos” (page 266).

June

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Diego Vigil gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  7 de junio de 1837 al 6 de Enero de 1838…Vigil “vuelve como Jefe Supremo el 7 de junio de 1837.  En junio 15 de 1837 estalla en Santa Ana un Movimiento Revolucionario, pero es sofocado.  El Gobierno decreta amnistía para todos los comprometidos en los movimientos revolucionarios” (page 43).

1838

January

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 6 de enero de 1838 [Vigil] entregó la Primera Magistratura a don Timoteo Menéndez” (page 43).  “Don Timoteo Menéndez (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  6 de Enero de 1838 al 23 de Mayo de 1839” (page 45).

February

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1838—“El General Rafael Carrera toma la ciudad de Guatemala; las tropas…asesinan al Vice-Presidente Federal General José Gregorio Salazar, y deponen al Jefe del Estado, Dr. Mariano Gálvez, quien desde el año de 1831 había sido electo por la Asamblea Legislativa del Estado” (page 268). Febrero 2, 1838—“El Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, ciudadano Diego Vigil, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Vice-Jefe Timoteo Menéndez…Febrero 24, 1838—La Asamblea Legislativa decreta fusionar en una misma Municipalidad, las de Asunción y Dolores Izalco, con el nombre de Villa Izalco” (page 269).

May

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 30—El Congreso federal declara libres á los Estados que componían la Federación de Centro-América para que pudieran constituirse del modo que tuviesen por conveniente, conservando, empero, la forma de Gobierno popular representativo” (page 104).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 1, 1838—“El Congreso Federal declara electo popularmente, como Vice Presidente Federal, al ciudadano Diego Vigil, según elección mandada a practicar el diez de Abril de 1837…En el Estado de El Salvador no se han practicado elecciones de Autoridades Federales” (page 272).

July

Monterey 1977:  Julio 1838—“Al llegar a San Salvador el General Francisco Morazán asume la Presidencia de la disuelta Federación” (page 273).

October

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “Following a major popular revolt in San Salvador in September 1838, Carrera again attacked the cities of Santa Ana and Ahuachapán on October 28, withdrawing to Guatemala after the raid.  He received support from the region’s Indians” (page 113).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 28 de octubre de 1838, el General Rafael Carrerra…invadió el Estado de El Salvador, tomando las ciudades de Santa Ana y Ahuachapán…El General Morazán derrota a Carrera” (page 45).

1839

Browning 1971:  “It was not until 1839 that a small group of citizens of San Salvador declared that the land and the people around them constituted the independent republic, the ‘patria,’ of El Salvador” (page 139).

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 17, 1839—“El Vice-Jefe del Estado de El Salvador, don Timoteo Menéndez pide a los Gobiernos de Honduras y Nicaragua que expresen por qué quieren hacer la Guerra al Estado de El Salvador” (page 276).  Enero 18, 1839—“Los Gobiernos de Honduras, Nicaragua y Costa Rica se comprometen, por el Tratado de Comayagua, a hacerle la Guerra al Estado de El Salvador y al Gobierno Federal, para sostener la Soberanía de sus Estados, efectuar las reformas a la Constitución Federal y separar al General Morazán del Mando Supremo…Enero 31, 1839—Termina el Segundo período presidencial para el cual fué reelecto el General Francisco Morazán” (page 277).

February

Karnes 1976:  Morazán’s “second term of office expired on February 1, 1839, and there was no movement to bother with a new election.  He assumed the title of ‘jefe’ of El Salvador, and to a great extent his troops and finances henceforth were Salvadorean even though he might refer to them as federal” (page 86).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En febrero 23 de 1839, Fuerzas de Honduras y Nicaragua invaden el territorio salvadoreño y el Gobierno de El Salvador don Timoteo Menéndez nombra al General Francisco Morazán, General en Jefe del Ejército Salvadoreño” (page 45).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 26, 1839—“Decreto de la Asamblea Legislativa convocando a elecciones de Diputados para una Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador, que reforme la Constitución del Estado y nombre los representantes a la Convención Nacional” (page 277).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 1839—“El Gobierno de la Federación a cargo de don Diego Vigil y el de El Salvador a cargo de don Timoteo Menéndez, nombran al General Francisco Morazán, General en Jefe del ejército salvadoreño” (page 279).

April

Wortman 1982:  Honduras and Nicaragua “agreed to oppose Morazán’s occupation of Salvador, and in April 1839 their united forces met an outnumbered federal army in battle.  Morazán’s superior military experience enabled him to carry away a federal victory” (page 265).

May

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 23 de mayo del mismo 1839, entrega el Supremo Poder don Timoteo Menéndez al Dr. y Coronel don Antonio José Cañas” (page 45).  “Doctor y coronel Antonio José Cañas (salvadoreño) gobernó como Consejero:  23 de Mayo al 11 de Julio de 1839” (page 55).

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 26—Reincorporado al Estado de El Salvador el partido de Zacatecoluca que formaba parte del distrito federal, fue erigido, juntamente con el partido de Olocuilta, en un nuevo departamento con el título de ‘Departamento de la Paz’” (page 115).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 1, 1839—“El Consejero Coronel Antonio José Cañas, toma posesión del Mando Supremo, como Jefe del Estado de El Salvador, en sustitución del ciudadano Timoteo Menéndez” (page 279).  Mayo 16, 1839—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, decreta convocando a elecciones de Jefe del Estado, en sustitución del señor don Diego Vigil, que se había hecho cargo de la Presidencia Federal” (page 280).

June

Monterey 1977:  Junio 30, 1839—“Deja de ser Capital de la Federación de Centro América la ciudad de San Salvador” (page 281).

July: presidential election (Morazán / Liberal)

Bonilla 2000a:  “1839.  En julio, Francisco Morazán asume el gobierno de El Salvador como Jefe Supremo (1839-1840)” (page 112).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Francisco Morazán (hondureño) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  11 Julio de 1839 al 16 de Febrero de 1840” (page 47).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 6, 1839—“La Asamblea Legislativa declara electo popularmente, como Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, al General Francisco Morazán, y como Vice-Jefe al Licenciado José María Silva” (page 281).  Julio 13, 1839—“El General Morazán tomó posesión del Mando Supremo de manos del Consejero Antonio José Cañas y nombró como Ministro al General José Miguel Saravia” (page 282).

Vidal 1970: “El 8 de julio [de 1839] la Asamblea salvadoreña decretaba que Morazán había sido electo Jefe de Estado, 54 votos sobre 84" (pages 219-220).

August

Monterey 1977:  Agosto 1, 1839—“Se instala en Zacatecoluca la Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador” (page 283).

September

Marure 1895:  “En septiembre de 839, se experimentó [un terremoto en El Salvador]” (page 63).  “Septiembre 16—Algunos barrios de la ciudad de San Salvador se levantaron en masa contra las autoridades federales, y especialmente contra el General Morazán, que poco antes se había hecho cargo del Gobierno del Estado en concepto de primer Jefe” (page 119).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 11, 1839—“El Gobierno del Estado dispone trasladar la capital a la ciudad de San Salvador, dejando en esta fecha de serlo la ciudad de San Vicente” (page 284).

Wortman 1982:  “In September 1839 a coup in Salvador overthrew the federal government and Morazán attacked and defeated the city” (pages 265-266).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1, 1839—“Fuerte temblor que deja la ciudad de San Salvador casi en ruinas, por lo cual el Presidente, General Francisco Morazán, traslada las oficinas del Gobierno a la ciudad de Cojutepeque” (page 285).

November

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 17, 1839—“Insubordinación de los volcaneños de Santa Ana” (page 285).

1840

Bonilla 2000b:  “En 1840, los líderes que Morazán hizo prisioneros o mandó al exilio en 1832, 1834 y 1836 aprovecharon para retornar al poder político.  Los líderes militares derrotados en Guatemala en 1840 y los partidarios políticos de Morazán en San Salvador salieron al exilio a Sur América” (page 132).

Browning 1971:  “Coffee was introduced to El Salvador at an unrecorded date, but was being cultivated on a small scale for local use during the early years of the nineteenth century…The credit for demonstrating the commercial value of coffee to Salvadorians is popularly given to a Brazilian immigrant…who in 1840 bought a small farm in the suburbs of San Salvador [and] planted it with coffee” (page 155).

Ching 1997:  Indirect elections are “in use between 1840 and 1872.  Indirect elections enhanced the political power of the hacendados, because voting districts often coincided directly with the boundaries of haciendas.  The first stage of an indirect election, when voters gathered to choose electors, occurred in the cantones, the administrative sub-units of a municipality.  Cantones often were made up of nothing more than one or two haciendas, giving landowners a clear advantage to control the selection of electores.  Above and beyond all other aspects of the electoral system, the oral vote [in use until 1950] insured the predominance of patron-client relations” (pages 65-66).  Describes process for recording oral votes.  “Throughout the nineteenth century, national politics followed to a great extent the rise and fall of alliances between departmental networks.  For instance, in the mid 1840s San Vicente and San Miguel were allied against Sonsonate and San Salvador” (page 163).

Dalton 1963: “(En) 1840 se introdujo en el país el cultivo del café” (page 40).

García 1995:  “Malespin dominated El Salvador as a surrogate for Guatemalan general Rafael Carrera, a Conservative whose influence stretched over a good portion of Central America for several years after he defeated Francisco Morazan in 1840” (page 38).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “A similar revolt took place in Santiago Nonualco on December 10, 1840, but was quickly repressed…All these movements were conncted to larger political turmoil about which little is known” (page 113).

Munro 1967: “The Liberal party, which had supported Morazán, was driven from power by the intervention of President Carrera of Guatemala in 1840, and for five years the government was under the control of Francisco Malespín, one of Carrera’s friends” (page 101).

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado José María Silva (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  16 de Febrero de 1840 al 5 de Abril de 1840” (page 49).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 4, 1840—“La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador, nombra al Coronel Antonio José Cañas, designado a la Presidencia del Estado” (page 288).

March

Bonilla 2000b:  “(L)a derrota de Morazán en Guatemala, el 19 de marzo de 1840, su regreso y salida al exilio por presiones internas y guatemaltecas, dejó un vacío en San Salvador, rápidamente ocupado por sus opositores” (page 134).

Karnes 1976:  “Morazán made a last desperate attempt to save his position.  He struck at the center of his enemies and on March 18, 1840, captured Guatemala City once more with his Salvadorean troops.  About four o’clock of the next morning, Carrera, with the city now supporting ‘him,’ was able to retake the central plaza….[Morazán] and his survivors fled from the bloody engagement, going by way of Antigua to El Salvador” (page 88).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 1840—“El General Francisco Morazán, deposita el Mando Supremo del Estado en el Vice-Jefe Lic. José María Silva, para efectuar la campaña contra Guatemala” (page 288).

Woodward 1985:  “A showdown between Morazán and Carrera remained inevitable.  Morazán refused to abandon the federation idea, even though…he held only El Salvador.  In March 1840 he took the initiative and invaded Guatemala” (page 111).  His forces are defeated by those of Carrera.

April

Karnes 1976:  Morazán sailed from Acajutla “on the fifth of April, stopping long enough at La Libertad to take on board additional chief lieutenants.  Then into exile they went, some forty or fifty men including the vice president of the federation and the chief of state of El Salvador” (page 88).  “With the departure of Morazán the story of the first federation comes to a close…The Morazanistas and Federalistas were defeated, quiet and everywhere out of power.  Carrera was able to establish his puppets in El Salvador” (page 89).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El Concejo Municipal de San Salvador…asumió el Gobierno [el 5 de abril de 1840] por abandono del Poder Supremo del Gobernante Licenciado José María Silva, quien determinó acompañar al General Francisco Morazán, cuando éste abandonó El Salvador…junto con muchos de sus seguidores.  Este Concejo Municipal de San Salvador, entregó el Mando Supremo, al Dr. y Coronel Antonio José Cañas, el 7 de abril de 1840” (page 53).  “Doctor y Coronel Antonio José Cañas (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Consejero:  7 de Abril de 1840 al 20 de Septiembre de 1840” (page 55).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 4, 1840—“El General Francisco Morazán…expone su renuncia de la Presidencia de El Salvador, y su resolución de salir del país” (page 289).  Abril 15, 1840—“El Consejero designado, Coronel Antonio José Cañas, se hace cargo del Gobierno de El Salvador…Abril 24, 1840—El Jefe del Estado Coronel Antonio José Cañas, convoca a elecciones de Diputados a la Constituyente” (page 290).

May

Bonilla 2000b:  “Una delegación negociadora guatemalteca llegó a San Salvador el 13 de mayo, encabezada por el mismo Carrera y 200 soldados para imponer la firma de un tratado de paz.  Sobresale la imposición de Francisco Malespín como comandante del Ejército.  Este nombramiento ocasionó inestabilidad política en el futuro” (page 134).

June

Monterey 1977:  Junio 23, 1840—“En la ciudad de San Salvador inaugura sus sesiones la Asamblea Constituyente” (page 291).

September

Bonilla 2000a:  “1840.  En septiembre, Francisco Malesín impone como Jefe del Estado a Norberto Ramírez (1840-1841)” (page 112).

Bonilla 2000b:  “Malespín organizó una sublevación, el 20 de septiembre, para presionar el retiro de Antonio José Cañas” (page 134).

Figeac 1938:  “Un cuartelazo que inesperadamente estalló en San Salvador el 14 de septiembre de 1840 y que por cierto no alcanzó todo el éxito esperado por los traidores, decidió al conspícuo don Antonio José Cañas a depositar la jefatura del Estado en el ciudadano don Norberto Ramírez” (page 139).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado Norberto Ramírez (nicaragüense) gobernó como Senador:  del 20 de septiembre de 1840 al 7 de enero de 1841…El 20 de septiembre de 1840, estalló una sublevación en los cuarteles de San Salvador, contra el Gobierno del Coronel Antonio José Cañas; sublevación fomentada por el Comandante General del Ejército, General Francisco Malespín, porque el Coronel Cañas no se prestaba a ser su instrumento en la Administración” (page 57).

Marure 1895:  “Septiembre 20—La guarnición de la ciudad de San Salvador, excitada por su mismo Comandante, se subleva contra el Jefe del Estado, señor Antonio José Cañas, y desconoce su autoridad.  Tres días después de este suceso, Cañas, honrándose con un acto de noble desprendimiento, deposita el mando en el Ldo. Norberto Ramírez, llamado por la ley á sucederle” (page 125).

December

Figeac 1938:  Ramírez “tomó la dirección del gobierno...(C)uando menos lo esperaba, se alborotaron los indios de Santiago Nonualco contra su autoridad.  Esta sublevación...se inició el 10 de diciembre” (page 139).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En diciembre de 1840 estalló una asonada en Santiago Nonualco, encabezada por Petronilo Castro, la que fue reprimida por el Gobierno” (page 57).

1841

Taplin 1972: “January 31, 1841.  The National Assembly formally declared the separation of El Salvador from the Central American Federation.   February 8, 1841.  Salvador approved a new constitution; promulgated April 11, 1841.  Congress to consist of the House of Representatives, chosen annually; and the Senate, elected one-half every second year; to meet on January 1st of each year; sessions were limited to 40 days.  The President elected for two-year term without the privilege of two terms in succession; must receive an absolute majority of votes, otherwise Congress should choose one of the two candidates having the largest number of votes” (page 99).

January

Bonilla 2000b:  “Cañas presentó su renuncia y se nombró como jefe Provisorio a Juan Lindo, el 7 de enero de 1841.  Como suplente quedó José María Cornejo, quien de esta forma retornaba a la política salvadoreña” (page 135).

Figeac 1938:  Ramírez tries to return the presidency to Cañas but he refuses.  “(L)a Asamblea Constituyente se instaló el 4 de enero de 1841 y en sus primeras sesiones resolvió admitir las renuncias de referencia, llamando al poder al hondureño don Juan Lindo” (page 140).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado Juan Lindo (hondureño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  7 enero de 1841 al 20 de junio 1841” (page 59).

Marure 1895:  “Enero 30—La Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador, en acuerdo de esta fecha, manda que en lo sucesivo aquel Estado se denomine ‘República de San Salvador.’  Nunca, empero, llegó á usarse de semejante denominación ni por la misma Asamblea” (page 127).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 7, 1841—“La Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador…admite al Coronel Antonio José Cañas, la renuncia formal que hace de Jefe Provisional del Estado…Se nombra en su lugar, Jefe Provisional…al señor Licenciado Juan Lindo” (page 296).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Se creó un poder legislativo bicameral, con una cámara de diputados y otra de senadores.  Los diputados elegidos para períodos de un año y los senadores para seis (art. 16)…El ejecutivo sería ejercido por un presidente electo cada dos años (art. 42)…(P)or esta Constitución los jefes de Estado pasaron a llamarse presidentes” (page 135).

Ching 1997:  In the 1841 constitution suffrage “was made universal for all men over the age of twenty-one…Elections for municipal officials…remained indirect, and although national elections were made direct, candidates for national-level office had to meet certain wealth requirements.  Deputies and Senators to the National Assembly had to prove possession of 500 and 4,000 ‘pesos’ respectively, and the President and Vice President had to own at least 8,000 ‘pesos’ each” (page 52).  “The Constitution of 1841…stipulated that the president had to choose his governor from a list of candidates sent to him by the officials of the cabacera, effectively giving them control over the selection process.  Presidents often disobeyed the rule by ignoring the list…Not until the 1910s and 1920s did presidents commonly assign outsiders to a department’s ranking posts” (pages 164-165).  Discusses how presidents used their appointments. 

Elam 1968:  “The constitution of 1841, in effect until 1864, provided the president with the authority to use troops and the congress with the power to raise them for the defense of the nation.  The armed forces were declared apolitical.  Active officers were prohibited from serving in congress, though no such prohibition was applied to the presidency.  A more serious omission, however, was the failure to provide the chief executive with the powers of commander-in-chief.  As a consequence, civilian presidents often found themselves wholly dependent upon the country’s senior officer” (page 4).

Gamero Q. 2000:  “La Constitución de 1841 establece en el Organo Legislativo el bicameralismo.  El territorio se divide en departamentos y distritos” (page 123).  Gives guidelines for the election of senators and representatives, the requirements for candidacy, and the frequency of elections. 

Krennerich 2005:  “The constitution of 1841 stated that the president and parliament were to be elected directly.  However…political development of El Salvador was characterized by power struggles between the regional caudillos, who often resorted to violence as a means of solving political conflicts.  The position of president changed hands frequently and irregularly” (page 269).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 2, 1841—“La Asamblea Constituyente decreta declarando a El Salvador República soberana e independiente y reasumiendo la soberanía nacional” (page 297).  Febrero 18, 1841—“La Asamblea Constituyente emite la Segunda Constitución Política de El Salvador, que sustituye a la del doce de junio de 1824.  Establece el período presidencial por el término de dos años, declarando prohibida la reelección.  Emite la Ley Reglamentaria de Elecciones de Autoridades Supremas” (pages 298-299).

Parker 1981: “A new constitution was adopted in February 1841 still providing for existence as a state in a union, though an assembly the month before had called the state the republic of El Salvador.  A two-house legislature was to be chosen by democratic processes and presidential elections were to be held every second year; but affairs were not regularized immediately” (page 149).

April

Marure 1895:  “Abril 11—Se verificó en la ciudad capital de El Salvador la jura solemne de la nueva Constitución de aquel Estado, decretada en 18 de febrero del mismo año de 41” (pages 127-128).

June

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado Juan Lindo (hondureño) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  28 junio 1841 al 1o febrero de 1842” (page 59).  “Don Pedro Arce y Fagoaga (salvadoreño) gobernó como Senador Designado:  20 al 28 de junio de 1841” (page 71).

September

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 1, 1841—“El Supremo Gobierno de El Salvador convoca extraordinariamente a la Asamblea y Senado a sesiones extraordinarias” (page 301).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1841—“Movimientos revolucionarios en San Salvador y San Miguel, con el objeto de proclamar Jefe de la República, al General Licenciado Nicolás Espinoza” (page 302).

November

Marure 1895:  “Noviembre 6—Son disueltas las cámaras legislativas de El Salvador y deportados varios de sus miembros por orden del Jefe de aquel Estado, Ldo. Señor Juan Lindo, quien en seguida decretó la convocatoria de otras nuevas cámaras é hizo ante ellas dimisión del mando.  Dieron merito á estas providencias violentas las sospechas de que los Diputados y Senadores expulsos trabajaban por restablecer las cosas al estado que tenían antes de la emigración del ex-Presidente Morazán” (pages 128-129).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 12, 1841—“El Presidente Lindo convoca a los ciudadanos para que el siguiente domingo del inmediato diciembre, procedan a la elección de Diputados a la Cámara Legislativa y la de los Senadores que deben reemplazar a los…[que] fueron expulsados por estar complicados en la conspiración de octubre” (page 303).

December

Ching 1997:  In “the presidential election of December 1841, one of three elections held that year [May, August, December], multiple candidates participated in the election, suggesting that no single boss was able to establish unmitigated supremacy” (page 179).

1842

Bonilla 2000b:  “1842.  Se erige la diocesis de San Salvador y se nombra obispo a Jorge de Viteri y Ungo” (page 144).

Ching 1997:  “Between 1824 and 1842 El Salvador participated in 40 inter-state battles” (page 150).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1842 civil war broke out again as opposition to President Lindo grew. An attack on the garrison by residents of San Salvador’s poor neighborhoods contributed to Lindo’s removal” (page 113).

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1842—“Conmociones revolucionarias…contra el Gobierno presidido por el Lic. Juan Lindo, debidas a los abusos administrativos y las arbitrariedades cometidas contra los miembros de la Asamblea Legislativa, el Senado y la Corte Suprema de Justicia” (page 304).  Enero 27, 1842—“Se instala en la ciudad de San Vicente el Congreso Legislativo, el cual…convoca a los pueblos para la elección de Presidente y Vice-Presidente de la República” (page 305).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Morazán regresó, desembarcó en el Puerto de La Unión el 15 de febrero de 1842.  El gobierno del Presidente Guzmán declaró movilización general para impedir su retorno…La forma como en El Salvador se vivió el regreso y muerte de Morazán es sorprendente y casi desconocida porque se piensa que Morazán fue siempre muy popular para los salvadoreños; empero se olvida que el culto morazánico comenzó con la administración de Gerardo Barrios” (page 135).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Escolástico Marín (salvadoreño) gobernó como Senador:  1o de febrero al 12 de abril de 1842” (page 63).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1842—“Por no haber mayoría absoluta de votos a favor de los candidatos, la Asamblea Legislativa elige al Coronel don Antonio José Cañas como Presidente Constitucional de El Salvador, y como Suplentes, a los ciudadanos Lic. Juan José Guzmán, José María Cornejo y José María Campo Pomar.  Por no haber aceptado el Coronel don Antonio José Cañas por sus enfermedades y avanzada edad, la Asamblea nombra al Lic. Juan José Guzmán por haber sido designado en el sorteo de ley; y mientras dure la ausencia del Lic. Guzmán, nombra al Brigadier Escolástico Marín.  El Presidente Provisorio, Lic. Juan Lindo, ocurre a la Asamblea Nacional y manifiesta qu el día anterior habia terminado el período legal de su nombramiento como Presidente de la República; que, en consecuencia, debe depositar el Mando Supremo en un Consejero por falta de Presidente, por lo cual deposita en el Consejero General Escolástico Marín” (page 305).

March

Anderson 1981:  “At Chinandega, Nicaragua, in March 1842, representatives of Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua met together, although Guatemala and Costa Rica refused to attend” (page 5).

April

Figeac 1938:  “El 14 de abril, coincidiendo con la victoria obtenida por los liberales en Costa Rica, tomó posesión de la jefatura de El Salvador, el licenciado don Juan José Guzmán, habiendo sido trasladada pocos días antes, de San Vicente a San Salvador, la sede de las autoridades supremas del Estado” (page 144).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General y licenciado Juan José Guzmán (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente:  13 abril al 30 de junio de 1842” (page 67).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 14, 1842—“El Consejero Licenciado Juan José Guzmán se hace cargo de la Presidencia de El Salvador, en sustitución del Senador Escolástico Marín” (page 309).

June

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Dionisio Villacorta (salvadoreño) gobernó como Senador:  30 de junio al 19 de julio de 1842…Este período fue de transición, durante el cual don Dionisio Villacorta convocó a elecciones para Presidente y Vice-Presidente de la República” (page 65).

July

Anderson 1981:  “In July of [1842], the three countries [Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua] signed a pact of confederation” (page 5).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Escolástico Marín (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Senador:  19 de julio al 26 de septiembre de 1842…El 19 de julio de 1842 el General Escolástico Marín recibe el Gobierno de don Dionisio Villacorta” (page 63).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 28, 1842—“El Consejero Presidente, Lic. Juan José Guzmán, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Designado Senador don Dionisio Villacorta” (page 312).

September

Alcántara Sáez 1998:  “La Iglesia tuvo un poder notable, a pesar de que no era tan rica como la de Guatemala, pero se vio beneficiada por la creación en 1842 de la diócesis de San Salvador; los comerciantes de añil desempeñaron un papel predominante, y la tónica política general era de un fuerte conservadurismo, en el que los Presidentes de paja del guatemalteco Carrera se alternaron en el poder bajo el teórico imperio de la Constitución de 1841” (page 130).

Figeac 1938:  Morazán is executed by the conservatives in Costa Rica on September 15, 1842 (page 145).  “Cinco días después de la criminal ejecución del general Morazán, en San Salvador era designados por la Asamblea Legislativa, presidente y vice-presidente de la República, el licenciado don Juan José Guzmán y el doctor don Antonio José Cañas, para un nuevo período” (page 146).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El General Francisco Morazán…murió fusilado a los 50 años de edad en San José, Costa Rica el 15 de Septiembre de 1842” (page 47).  “General y licenciado Juan José Guzmán (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Presidente Constitucional:  26 septiembre de 1842 al 26 de enero de 1843” (page 67).

Llanes 1995:  “A Salvadorian diocese was established by Rome on 30 September 1842” (page 42).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 7, 1842—“El Senador Presidente don Dionisio Villacorta, depositó el Mando Supremo en el Consejero Licenciado Juan José Guzmán, quien inaugural un gobierno de conciliación…y convoca a los pueblos para las elecciones de Presidente y Vice-Presidente de la República de El Salvador, por la renuncia del Coronel Antonio José Cañas…Septiembre 20, 1842—La Cámara Legislativa, por no haber mayoría de sufragios…designa como Presidente Constitucional del Estado de El Salvador, electo por la Asamblea General, al Licenciado Juan José Guzmán, y como Suplente en la Presidencia, al Coronel Antonio José Cañas” (page 313).  Septiembre 30, 1842—“La Asamblea Legislativa acepta la renuncia que el Coronel Antonio José Cañas, hace como Suplente y designa como Suplente del Presidente del Estado, al señor don Pedro Arce” (page 314).

Vidal 1970: On September 20, 1842 the National Assembly announces the election of Juan J. Guzmán as president (page 249).

October

Bonilla 2000b:  A los “partidarios sobrevivientes a la tragedia [de Morazán] se les permitió regresar a El Salvador por tratado firmado entre el gobierno costarricense y el gobierno salvadoreño, el 15 de octubre de 1842.  Este grupo formó una poderosa facción donde destacó Gerardo Barrios.  Estas facciones representaban las dos tendencias principales en que se fue diferenciando el liberalismo salvadoreño hasta dividirse en las facciones:  constitucional y absolutista” (page 132).

1843

Bonilla 2000b:  “1843.  Regreso a San Salvador de los partidarios de Morazán en el barco ‘Coquimbo’” (page 144).

January

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Pedro Arce y Fagoaga (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Vice-Presidente:  26 enero al 8 de marzo de 1843” (page 71).

Monterey 1978:  Enero 23, 1843—“Por grave enfermedad del Presidente, Licenciado Juan José Guzmán, se hace cargo del Poder Ejecutivo, el Suplente, don Pedro Arce” (page 13).

March

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General y licenciado Juan José Guzmán (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Presidente:  8 de marzo de 1843 al 31 enero de 1844” (page 67).

Monterey 1978:  Marzo 28, 1843—“La Cámara de Senadores decreta convocando a los ciudadanos salvadoreños para elegir el Presidente que deba ejercer el Poder Ejecutivo del Estado en los años de 1844 y 1845, hasta el día último de enero.  Las elecciones deben verificarse el primer domingo de diciembre del presente año” (page 14).

September

Bonilla 2000b:  “El Obispo Viteri comenzó a desestabilizar el sistema político utilizando la fuerza de Malespín para la supresión de los periódicos, y posteriormente contribuyó al derrocamiento de Juan José Guzmán” (page 137).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En septiembre de 1843 el día 25 llega a San Salvador el Obispo Dr. Jorge Viteri y Ungo…El Obispo Viteri había sido propuesto por el Gobierno de El Salvador a Su Santidad.  En este tercer período le correspondió gobernar al Presidente Guzmán en un ambiente de intrigas políticas por ambiciones del Poder.  El Gral. Francisco Malespín conspiraba por llegar a gobernar y el Obispo Viteri y Ungo por governar al Gobernante” (page 68).

Llanes 1995:  “The first duly elected bishop of El Salvador was Jorge de Viteri.  Viteri, in the style of Archbishop Casaus, tried to rule over the affairs of the state.  He opposed Salvadorian President Juan José Guzmán for granting asylum to remnant forces of Morazán.  Viteri was successful in mounting public opposition to Guzmán and public support for Conservative Malespín” (page 42).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 10, 1843—“El Comandante Militar, General Francisco Malespín, depone del Mando Supremo al Lic. Juan José Guzmán…Diciembre 20, 1843—El Vice-Presidente don Pedro Arce asume la Presidencia de la República, llamado por el Comandante Militar General Malespín…Se efectúan las elecciones para Presidente del Estado de El Salvador, habiendo obtenido votos el General Francisco Malespín y otros más” (page 22).

1844

January

Figeac 1938:  “En cuanto el licenciado Juan José Guzmán bajó del poder público a los remansos de la vida privada, el vice-presidente constitucional don Pedro Arce convocó con fecha 16 de enero de 1844 a la Asamblea Legislativa y ésta abrió sus sesiones el 30 del mismo mes, bajo la presidencia de don Victoriano Nuila.  Acaban de verificarse elecciones para designar popularmente al substituto del licenciado Guzmán, pero como ninguno de los candidatos obtuviera mayoría absoluta, la Asamblea Nacional eligió en su sesión del 7 de febrero, como presidente de la República, al general Francisco Malespín” (page 153).

Monterey 1978:  Enero 1844—“Se efectúan en El Salvador las elecciones de Autoridades Supremas, bajo la presión del Comandante Militar, General Francisco Malespín…Enero 31, 1844—Las Cámaras Legislativas, considerando que el período constitucional concluye este día, designa para que se haga cargo del Poder Ejecutivo interinamente, mientras se declara quien sea electo, al Senador don Fermín Palacios” (page 24).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Se convocó a elecciones y fueron ganadas por Malespín el 5 de febrero de 1844” (page 137).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El Presidente Guzmán entrega el Mando a don Fermín Palacios el 1o de febrero de 1844” (page 68).  “General Francisco Malespín (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente:  febrero 7 al 9 mayo de 1844” (page 73).  “El 7 de febrero de 1844 fue elegido Presidente de la República [Francisco Malespín], con ayuda de la influencia del Obispo Jorge Viteri y Ungo, pues el General Malespín era ahijado suyo” (page 73).

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 1, 1844—“El Senador don Fermín Palacios asume el Mando Supremo.  Febrero 5, 1844—Por no haber mayoría absoluta de sufragios a favor de los candidatos, la Asamblea Legislativa, influenciada por el Ilmo. Obispo Viteri, elige al General Francisco Malespín como Presidente Constitucional de El Salvador; y como Vice-Presidente al ciudadano Luis Ayala…Febrero 7, 1844—Toma posesión del Mando Supremo el General Francisco Malespín” (page 24).

March

Anderson 1981:  “(A) [confederated] government was established in San Vicente, El Salvador, on 29 March 1844.  This was designed to create a federal government with a president elected for a four-year term, but within a year the plan had fallen through” (page 5).

Bonilla 2000b:  “(E)l 29 de marzo, fue instalado el gobierno confederado con sede en San Vicente” (page 137).

Figeac 1938:  “Según decreto legislativo fechado a 4 de marzo de 1844, se permitió la reapertura de los conventos y monasterios” (page 154).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Marzo de 1844 la Asamblea Legislativa decreta restableciendo el fuero eclesiástico al Clero de El Salvador, bajo la autoridad eclesiástica, inmunidad de que fue privado por el Art. 113 de la ley del 26 de agosto de 1830 que suprime dicho fuero” (page 74).

April

Monterey 1978:  Abril 25, 1844—“Las Cámaras Legislativas convocan a los pueblos de El Salvador a elecciones de diputados para reforma la Constitución emitida el 18 de febrero de 1841, a solicitud hecha en cabildo abierto, Constituyente que no se llevó a cabo” (page27).

May

Figeac 1938:  “El Salvador estaba en pie de guerra y como Malespín lograra organizar un formidable ejército para invadir Guatemala, el 9 de mayo depositó el mando en el vice-presidente don Joaquín Eufrasio Guzmán” (page 155).

June

Bonilla 2000b:  “Al regresar Malespín a San Salvador nombró a Barrios Jefe militar de San Miguel, donde junto a Cabañas comenzó a conspirar el derrocamiento de Malespín” (page 138).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Francisco Malespin (salvadoreño) gobernó…16 junio a 25 de octubre de 1844” (page 73).

September

Figeac 1938:  “(E)l 5 de septiembre del mismo año de 1844, estalló una revolución en la ciudad de San Miguel, encabezada por el general Trinidad Cabañas” (page 156).

October

Monterey 1978:  Octubre 25, 1844—“El Presidente General Francisco Malespín, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Vice Presidente, General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, y la Comandancia General del Ejército, en su hermano General Calixto Malespín, con el objeto de ponerse al mando de las tropas que combatirán al Gobierno de Nicaragua” (page 33).

1845

Ching 1997:  In 1845 the “regime of Francisco Malespin finally had been overthrown after much war and bloodshed, and now General Joaquín Eufrasio Guzmán of San Miguel was in power” (page 166).

Munro 1967: “The Liberals were able to return to power in 1845, after a bloody struggle in which Malespín, although now estranged from Carrera, was assisted by the government of Honduras” (page 102).

Taplin 1972: “The legislature convened in Salvador February 15, 1845, declared Malespín’s election void” (page 99).  “Vice-president [Guzmán] took executive authority October 25, 1844 [and] held power until February 1, 1846, when Malespín’s term would have ended” (page 100).

Vidal 1970: Vice president General Joaquín Guzmán overthrows the government (page 257).  “El Congreso decretó nulo la elección de Malespín” (page 258).

White 1973:  In 1845, “the Vice President, General Joaquín Guzmán, whom the conservative President Malespín had left in charge to go to fight against the liberals in Nicaragua, carried off a ‘coup’ against him; Guzmán had previously fought on the liberal side, and now once more co-operated with that party” (page 70).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Estando Malespín en [Nicaragua]; el Vicepresidente Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán derrocó a Malespín el 2 de febrero de 1845, con el apoyo de Barrios y Cabañas, con lo que retornaron al poder en El Salvador los partidarios de Morazán” (page 138).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 23 de febrero de 1845 el Obispo Dr. Jorge Viteri y Ungo, fulmina excomunión mayor en la Catedral de San Salvador, contra el General Francisco Malespín, por la fusilación del Presbítero Pedro Crespín” (page 74).  “Don Fermín Palacios (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Senador:  16 Febrero al 25 Abril de 1845” (page 77).

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 2, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente, Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, influenciado por su yerno, Coronel Gerardo Barrios y el General Trinidad Cabañas,…declara que asume el Mando Supremo…El Municipio de San Salvador desconoce al Presidente Francisco Malespín y se adhiere al nuevo Gobierno, lo mismo que las demás municipalidades del país” (page 40).  Febrero 7, 1845—“El General Francisco Malespín, como Presidente de El Salvador y General en Jefe del Ejército aliado de El Salvador y Honduras, decreta reasumiendo el mando de la República de El Salvador, y declara traidor al Vice-Presidente, Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán…Febrero 15, 1845—La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador declara nula la elección de Presidente de la República hecha en el General Francisco Malespín, por haberse efectuado contra lo prescrito expresamente por la ley” (page 41).  Febrero 16, 1845—“Las Cámaras Legislativas designan al Senador Fermín Palacios para que ejerza el Poder Ejecutivo del Estado durante la ausencia del Vice-Presidente, Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán.  El Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador don Fermín Palacios…Febrero 26, 1845—Los Gobiernos de Costa Rica, Nicaragua y Guatemala, reconocen al Gobierno del Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán” (page 42).

March

Monterey 1978:  Marzo 19, 1845—“En Nacaome el Gobierno de Honduras da a reconocer al General Francisco Malespín como Segundo Jefe del Ejército aliado que se formó para invadir a El Salvador y reponerle en el mando de Presidente de El Salvador” (page 43).

April

Monterey 1978:  Abril 14, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, asume el Mando Supremo, que había depositado en el Senador, General Fermín Palacios, para ponerse al frente de las tropas que combatirían al Presidente Francisco Malespín en San Miguel” (page 44).

May

Monterey 1978:  Mayo 24, 1845—“Considerando que el día primero del año proximo concluye el período constitucional para el ejercicio de la Presidencia del Estado, la Asamblea Legislativa convoca a los ciudadanos salvadoreños a elegir un Presidente, para que ejerza el Poder Ejecutivo del Estado de El Salvador en los años de 1846 y 1847, hasta el día último de enero de 1848.  Las elecciones deben efectuarse el primer domingo del próximo diciembre” (page 47).

August

Monterey 1978:  Agosto 7, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador don Fermín Palacios, para ir a combatir a las fuerzas invasoras hondureñas” (page 50).

September

Monterey 1978:  Septiembre 23, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, asume el Mando Supremo que había depositado en el Senador don Fermín Palacios” (page 52).

1846

Browning 1971:  “A decree of 1846 gave preferential treatment to [coffee] production:  any person who planted more than five thousand bushes was exempted from municipal taxes for a ten-year period; those working on a coffee estate were exempted from military service; and coffee produced during an initial seven-year period was not liable to export duties” (page 157).  “The expansion of coffee production…led to an improvement and reorientation of the country’s transport system” (page 163).  “The changes to the country’s landscape caused by expanding coffee plantations and the construction of roads, railways and ports, were the most obvious results of the introduction of large-scale farming…More important…were the changed attitudes towards the land” (page 165).  “(C)ommercial coffee farming, introduced rapidly and on a large scale, made immediate and pressing demands on the existing pattern of land use and ownership” (page 166).  “(M)any of the land-holding village communities did make a considerable effort to adapt themselves to the new situation but…they did not succeed” (page 167).  “(C)offee farming was introduced into the country’s most populated districts where the pattern of the land-holding village community was most strongly developed.  Inevitably there were demands made on the villages by the coffee planters for the areas of common land that were suitable for coffee and early demands for the labour which the village communities could supply…Above all else it was the introduction of coffee that persuaded those in control of the nation’s affairs to reform the use and ownership of the land of El Salvador…That these reforms led to a rapid and dramatic transformation of the entire agrarian structure may be attributed to the complete authority of a small oligarchy in whose interests the changes were made, which, freed from colonial restraints, viewed the nation’s land and people as resources to be used for its own benefit in any ‘form of speculation’ it chose to embark upon” (pages 171-172).

García 1995:  “Malespin was killed in 1846…This occurred during fighting against a Liberal rebellion that had broken out in Nicaragua, precipitating a five-year return of Liberals to power in El Salvador.  Conservatives and Liberals fought regionally and locally until the late nineteenth century, when liberalism finally triumphed throughout the isthmus” (page 38).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “El 16 de febrero de 1846, la Asamblea del Estado eligió como Presidente al…Dr. Eugenio Aguilar, quien no permitió al obispo Viteri continuar interviniendo en los asuntos del Estado.  Con el Presidente Aguilar irrumpe en la vida política un nuevo estilo de liberalismo, más cercano a su ortodoxia” (page 138).

Ching 1997:  “In February 1846, Senator Fermín Palacios succeeded Guzmán to serve as interim President for three weeks while the National Assembly elected Eugenio Aguilar for the term 1846-48” (page 185).

Figeac 1938:  “Las Cámaras se reunieron el 5 de febrero y el primer asunto que trataron fue el que se refería al nombramiento popular del primer mandatario de la Nación, designación que hicieron las Cámaras en la persona del doctor Eugenio Aguilar por no haber alcanzado mayoría absoluta ninguno de los candidatos presidenciales” (pages 162-163).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Doctor Eugenio Aguilar (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente electo:  21 de Febrero al 12 de Julio de 1846…Durante este período tuvo que hacerle frente a varias asonadas y a las calumnias del Obispo Viteri, quien incitaba a las autoridades y al pueblo a la rebelión” (page 79).

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 1, 1846—“Por haber terminado el período para el cual fué electo, el Vice-Presidente General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador Fermín Palacios…Febrero 16, 1846—Se instala en la ciudad de San Salvador la Asamblea Legislativa, por no haber obtenido la mayoría de votos los candidatos en las elecciones de Autoridades Supremas.  La Asamblea Legislativa elige Presidente de El Salvador al Dr. Eugenio Aguilar, y como Vice-Presidente, al señor don José Campo” (page 55).

Vidal 1972: On February 1, 1846 Guzmán transfers the presidency to senator Palacios.  “Se encontraba la República en período eleccionario, siendo varios los candidatos que aspiraban a la primera magistratura.  No hubo elección popular y las Cámaras eligieron Presidente al doctor don Eugenio Aguilar” (pages 263-264).

March

Vidal 1972: “El 5 de marzo de 1846, la Asamblea decretó que la Comandancia General del Ejército, quedaba a cargo del Presidente de la República, poniendo así término a las escisiones entre ambas Altas Autoridades” (page 267). 

July

Bonilla 2000b:  “Después de sus intentos por desestabilizar al Gobierno de Aguilar, el obispo Viteri abandonó San Salvador el 24 de julio de 1846, acusando de ‘irreligioso’ al Presidente Aguilar.  El gobierno, cinco días después de su salida, con claridad y uso del concepto de estado de derecho, a través de decretos legisló la solución del conflicto, por un lado oficializó la expulsión del obispo, bajo los cargos de trastornador del orden público y conspirador contra el Estado; porque se probó su directa intervención en los desordenes callejeros y motines que se dieron en San Salvador; además, modificó el Código Penal, reforzando, con un decreto, el artículo que preveía castigos para los clérigos que provocaran alborotos políticos, valiéndose de su función religiosa” (pages 138-139).

Ching 1997:  “In July, just four months after taking office, Aguilar was deposed in a coup led by Palacios, who had allied with Bishop Viteri y Ungo” (page 185).  “Aguilar launched a counter-coup that forced Palacios to step down.  Bishop Viteri y Ungo fled into exile in Honduras… Aguilar remained in office for the duration of his term” (page 186).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En julio de 1846 el Obispo Viteri y Ungo abandona la Diócesis y se dirigió a Honduras, para unirse al General Francisco Malespín, con quien estaba en relaciones revolucionarias y para tratar de invadir a El Salvador” (page 74).  “Don Fermín Palacios (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Senador:  12 al 21 de Julio de 1846…Su período fue efimero y al día siguiente de haber asumido el Poder, decretó el Estado de Sitio, obligado por las circunstancias cada día más graves, debido a la situación política provocada por el obispo Jorge Viteri y Ungo.  Su espíritu conciliador no logró contener las ambiciones políticas de dicho Obispo.  El 21 de julio de 1846 entregó de nuevo el Poder Supremo al Presidente Dr. Eugenio Aguilar” (page 77).  Aguilara gobernó “como Presidente:  21 de Julio de 1846 al 1o Febrero de 1848” (page 79).  “El 29 de julio de 1846 por Decreto Ejecutivo se prohibe al Obispo Viteri y Ungo regresar al país, declarándolo expulsado del territorio de El Salvador, por su complicidad en los motines de la capital” (page 80).

Llanes 1995:  “Viteri again incited the people against another president, Eugenio Aguilar…Aguilar denied the charges, and Viteri, having failed in his attempt to depose Aguilar, opted to leave the country.  Days later, Aguilar’s government pronounced Viteri a traitor and declared him exiled” (page 43).

Monterey 1978:  Julio 12, 1846—“El señor Presidente Dr. Aguilar contra el parecer de los Jefes Militares y demás vecinos, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador Fermín Palacios.  Julio 13, 1846—El Senador Presidente Fermín Palacios, decreta el Estado de Sitio en todo el País…Julio 18, 1846—(E)l Dr. Eugenio Aguilar asume el Mando Supremo de El Salvador” (page 61).  Julio 27, 1846—“El Ilustrísimo Obispo Jorge Viteri y Ungo abandona la Diócesis y se dirige a Honduras, para unirse al General Francisco Malespín, con quien estaba en relaciones revolucionarias, y trataba de invadir el país” (page 62).

November

Leistenschneider 1980:  General Francisco Malespin “murió asesinado en el pueblo de San Fernando, Departamento de Chalatenango, el 25 de noviembre de 1846, cuando comandaba una invasión a la República con el objeto de ocupar el Poder Ejecutivo” (page 73).

Monterey 1978:    Noviembre 23, 1846—“Se sublevan los indios de Santiago y San Juan Nonualco…El Gobierno de El Salvador manda una expedición punitiva a los pueblos de los nonualcos, comandada por el Coronel Gerardo Barrios, el cual incendia el pueblo de Santiago de Nonualco y fusila a numerosas personas…Noviembre 25, 1846—[Muere el] General Francisco Malespín” (page 65).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 13, 1846—“El señor Presidente Lic. Eugenio Aguilar, decreta derogando el decreto de Estado de Sitio…y reduciendo el Ejército a solo lo necesario” (page 65).

1847

Wade 2003:  “By the mid-nineteenth century…El Salvador’s once booming trade in indigo declined significantly…Recognizing that the indigo market was shrinking, the search began for a replacement crop…The introduction of coffee in the mid-nineteenth century coincided with the expansion of the state apparatus at a time when Conservatives and Liberals were fighting for political dominance.  Coffee and land were at the heart of the dispute.  In 1847 the Salvadoran legislature passed its first law supporting coffee, offering service exemptions and tax benefits to those who had more than 15,000 trees” (pages 26-27).

February

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 24, 1847—“Decreto Legislativo por el cual se convoca al pueblo salvadoreño para que elija los diputados que lo representen en una Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centro América y se comisiona el Poder Ejecutivo para que invite a los otros Estados para la reorganización de Centro América” (page 69).

October

Anderson 1981:  Meetings on confederation “followed at Sonsonate and then at Nacaome, on the Honduras-El Salvador border, resulting in the Pact of Nacaome of October 1847.  Unfortunately, this attempt to reestablish unity was ratified only by Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua.  Carrera disdained participation; and the Costa Ricans, although taking part in the discussions, never ratified the plan, which was thus stillborn” (page 5).

Monterey 1978:  Octubre 7, 1847—“La Dieta de Nacaome acuerda establecer un Gobierno Provisorio y convocar para una Asamblea Constituyente de los tres Estados contratantes [El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua]” (page 73).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 4, 1847—“Se efectuaron en todo el Estado de El Salvador, las elecciones de Presidente, Diputados y Senadores, resultando electo Presidente del Estado don Doroteo Vasconcelos” (page 74).

1848

January

Presidential election (Vasconcelos / Liberal)

Monterey 1978:  Enero 29, 1848—“La Asamblea Legislativa declara electo popularmente como Presidente Constitucional del Estado de El Salvador, para el período de 1848 a 1849, al Sr. don Doroteo Vasconcelos, quien a pesar de haber renunciado, la Asamblea se niega a admitirle la renuncia; fué designado por la suerte como Vice-Presidente al Lic. Félix Quiroz” (page 76).

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 1o de febrero de 1848 el Presidente Aguilar deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador don Tomás Medina” (page 80).  “Don Doroteo Vasconcelos (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente:  7 febrero de 1848 al 26 enero de 1850” (page 87).  “Licenciado Félix Quiroz (mexicano) gobernó como Vice-Presidente:  3 al 7 de febrero de 1848…Su período fue de transición.  Recibió el Gobierno de don Tomás Medina…el 3 de febrero de 1848 y el 7 del mismo mes y año lo entregó a don Doroteo Vasconcelos” (page 93).

1849

March

Bonilla 2000b:  Doroteo Vasconcelos “al término de su gestión promovió su reelección, para lo cual reformó la Constitución el 9 de marzo de 1849.  Deseaba otro mandato constitucional de dos años para reconstruir Centroamérica.  Francisco Dueñas y el Coronel Nicolás Angulo se opusieron a esta reforma, alegando que se quebrantaba el ordenamiento constitucional” (page 140).

Figeac 1938:  “Don Doroteo Vasconcelos se portó a la altura del deber patriótico en el primer período de su Administración, pero cometió un grave e imperdonable error:  permitió que lo reeligieran para un segundo período presidencial.  La Constitución Política entonces vigente, prohibía en su artículo 44 la reelección del presidente de la República, y para dar el paso apuntado se dispuso la reforma [de 9 de marzo de 1849 de la Cámara de Senadores]” (page 171).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En marzo de 1849 la Asamblea Legislativa reforma el Art. 44 de la Constitución Nacional, el cual fijaba el período presidencial para dos años, prohibiendo la reelección; la reforma permite la reelección de Presidente por una sola vez” (page 88).

Monterey 1978:  Marzo 17, 1849—“La Asamblea Legislativa…convoca a los pueblos a elecciones de Presidente del Estado, Diputados y Senadores” (page 85).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 1849—“Se efectúan en el Estado de El Salvador las elecciones de Autoridades Superiores; fué reelecto el Presidente don Doroteo Vasconcelos” (page 93).  “Se presentaron como principales candidatos a la Presidencia de la República, los señores Doroteo Vasconcelos y Lic. Francisco Dueñas” (page 94).

Browning 1971:  “It was not until 1839 that a small group of citizens of San Salvador declared that the land and the people around them constituted the independent republic, the ‘patria,’ of El Salvador” (page 139).

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 17, 1839—“El Vice-Jefe del Estado de El Salvador, don Timoteo Menéndez pide a los Gobiernos de Honduras y Nicaragua que expresen por qué quieren hacer la Guerra al Estado de El Salvador” (page 276).  Enero 18, 1839—“Los Gobiernos de Honduras, Nicaragua y Costa Rica se comprometen, por el Tratado de Comayagua, a hacerle la Guerra al Estado de El Salvador y al Gobierno Federal, para sostener la Soberanía de sus Estados, efectuar las reformas a la Constitución Federal y separar al General Morazán del Mando Supremo…Enero 31, 1839—Termina el Segundo período presidencial para el cual fué reelecto el General Francisco Morazán” (page 277).

February

Karnes 1976:  Morazán’s “second term of office expired on February 1, 1839, and there was no movement to bother with a new election.  He assumed the title of ‘jefe’ of El Salvador, and to a great extent his troops and finances henceforth were Salvadorean even though he might refer to them as federal” (page 86).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En febrero 23 de 1839, Fuerzas de Honduras y Nicaragua invaden el territorio salvadoreño y el Gobierno de El Salvador don Timoteo Menéndez nombra al General Francisco Morazán, General en Jefe del Ejército Salvadoreño” (page 45).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 26, 1839—“Decreto de la Asamblea Legislativa convocando a elecciones de Diputados para una Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador, que reforme la Constitución del Estado y nombre los representantes a la Convención Nacional” (page 277).

March

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 1839—“El Gobierno de la Federación a cargo de don Diego Vigil y el de El Salvador a cargo de don Timoteo Menéndez, nombran al General Francisco Morazán, General en Jefe del ejército salvadoreño” (page 279).

April

Wortman 1982:  Honduras and Nicaragua “agreed to oppose Morazán’s occupation of Salvador, and in April 1839 their united forces met an outnumbered federal army in battle.  Morazán’s superior military experience enabled him to carry away a federal victory” (page 265).

May

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 23 de mayo del mismo 1839, entrega el Supremo Poder don Timoteo Menéndez al Dr. y Coronel don Antonio José Cañas” (page 45).  “Doctor y coronel Antonio José Cañas (salvadoreño) gobernó como Consejero:  23 de Mayo al 11 de Julio de 1839” (page 55).

Marure 1895:  “Mayo 26—Reincorporado al Estado de El Salvador el partido de Zacatecoluca que formaba parte del distrito federal, fue erigido, juntamente con el partido de Olocuilta, en un nuevo departamento con el título de ‘Departamento de la Paz’” (page 115).

Monterey 1977:  Mayo 1, 1839—“El Consejero Coronel Antonio José Cañas, toma posesión del Mando Supremo, como Jefe del Estado de El Salvador, en sustitución del ciudadano Timoteo Menéndez” (page 279).  Mayo 16, 1839—“La Asamblea Legislativa del Estado de El Salvador, decreta convocando a elecciones de Jefe del Estado, en sustitución del señor don Diego Vigil, que se había hecho cargo de la Presidencia Federal” (page 280).

June

Monterey 1977:  Junio 30, 1839—“Deja de ser Capital de la Federación de Centro América la ciudad de San Salvador” (page 281).

July: presidential election (Morazán / Liberal)

Bonilla 2000a:  “1839.  En julio, Francisco Morazán asume el gobierno de El Salvador como Jefe Supremo (1839-1840)” (page 112).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Francisco Morazán (hondureño) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  11 Julio de 1839 al 16 de Febrero de 1840” (page 47).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 6, 1839—“La Asamblea Legislativa declara electo popularmente, como Jefe Supremo del Estado de El Salvador, al General Francisco Morazán, y como Vice-Jefe al Licenciado José María Silva” (page 281).  Julio 13, 1839—“El General Morazán tomó posesión del Mando Supremo de manos del Consejero Antonio José Cañas y nombró como Ministro al General José Miguel Saravia” (page 282).

Vidal 1970: “El 8 de julio [de 1839] la Asamblea salvadoreña decretaba que Morazán había sido electo Jefe de Estado, 54 votos sobre 84" (pages 219-220).

August

Monterey 1977:  Agosto 1, 1839—“Se instala en Zacatecoluca la Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador” (page 283).

September

Marure 1895:  “En septiembre de 839, se experimentó [un terremoto en El Salvador]” (page 63).  “Septiembre 16—Algunos barrios de la ciudad de San Salvador se levantaron en masa contra las autoridades federales, y especialmente contra el General Morazán, que poco antes se había hecho cargo del Gobierno del Estado en concepto de primer Jefe” (page 119).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 11, 1839—“El Gobierno del Estado dispone trasladar la capital a la ciudad de San Salvador, dejando en esta fecha de serlo la ciudad de San Vicente” (page 284).

Wortman 1982:  “In September 1839 a coup in Salvador overthrew the federal government and Morazán attacked and defeated the city” (pages 265-266).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1, 1839—“Fuerte temblor que deja la ciudad de San Salvador casi en ruinas, por lo cual el Presidente, General Francisco Morazán, traslada las oficinas del Gobierno a la ciudad de Cojutepeque” (page 285).

November

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 17, 1839—“Insubordinación de los volcaneños de Santa Ana” (page 285).

1840

Bonilla 2000b:  “En 1840, los líderes que Morazán hizo prisioneros o mandó al exilio en 1832, 1834 y 1836 aprovecharon para retornar al poder político.  Los líderes militares derrotados en Guatemala en 1840 y los partidarios políticos de Morazán en San Salvador salieron al exilio a Sur América” (page 132).

Browning 1971:  “Coffee was introduced to El Salvador at an unrecorded date, but was being cultivated on a small scale for local use during the early years of the nineteenth century…The credit for demonstrating the commercial value of coffee to Salvadorians is popularly given to a Brazilian immigrant…who in 1840 bought a small farm in the suburbs of San Salvador [and] planted it with coffee” (page 155).

Ching 1997:  Indirect elections are “in use between 1840 and 1872.  Indirect elections enhanced the political power of the hacendados, because voting districts often coincided directly with the boundaries of haciendas.  The first stage of an indirect election, when voters gathered to choose electors, occurred in the cantones, the administrative sub-units of a municipality.  Cantones often were made up of nothing more than one or two haciendas, giving landowners a clear advantage to control the selection of electores.  Above and beyond all other aspects of the electoral system, the oral vote [in use until 1950] insured the predominance of patron-client relations” (pages 65-66).  Describes process for recording oral votes.  “Throughout the nineteenth century, national politics followed to a great extent the rise and fall of alliances between departmental networks.  For instance, in the mid 1840s San Vicente and San Miguel were allied against Sonsonate and San Salvador” (page 163).

Dalton 1963: “(En) 1840 se introdujo en el país el cultivo del café” (page 40).

García 1995:  “Malespin dominated El Salvador as a surrogate for Guatemalan general Rafael Carrera, a Conservative whose influence stretched over a good portion of Central America for several years after he defeated Francisco Morazan in 1840” (page 38).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “A similar revolt took place in Santiago Nonualco on December 10, 1840, but was quickly repressed…All these movements were conncted to larger political turmoil about which little is known” (page 113).

Munro 1967: “The Liberal party, which had supported Morazán, was driven from power by the intervention of President Carrera of Guatemala in 1840, and for five years the government was under the control of Francisco Malespín, one of Carrera’s friends” (page 101).

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado José María Silva (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Vice-Jefe:  16 de Febrero de 1840 al 5 de Abril de 1840” (page 49).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 4, 1840—“La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador, nombra al Coronel Antonio José Cañas, designado a la Presidencia del Estado” (page 288).

March

Bonilla 2000b:  “(L)a derrota de Morazán en Guatemala, el 19 de marzo de 1840, su regreso y salida al exilio por presiones internas y guatemaltecas, dejó un vacío en San Salvador, rápidamente ocupado por sus opositores” (page 134).

Karnes 1976:  “Morazán made a last desperate attempt to save his position.  He struck at the center of his enemies and on March 18, 1840, captured Guatemala City once more with his Salvadorean troops.  About four o’clock of the next morning, Carrera, with the city now supporting ‘him,’ was able to retake the central plaza….[Morazán] and his survivors fled from the bloody engagement, going by way of Antigua to El Salvador” (page 88).

Monterey 1977:  Marzo 1840—“El General Francisco Morazán, deposita el Mando Supremo del Estado en el Vice-Jefe Lic. José María Silva, para efectuar la campaña contra Guatemala” (page 288).

Woodward 1985:  “A showdown between Morazán and Carrera remained inevitable.  Morazán refused to abandon the federation idea, even though…he held only El Salvador.  In March 1840 he took the initiative and invaded Guatemala” (page 111).  His forces are defeated by those of Carrera.

April

Karnes 1976:  Morazán sailed from Acajutla “on the fifth of April, stopping long enough at La Libertad to take on board additional chief lieutenants.  Then into exile they went, some forty or fifty men including the vice president of the federation and the chief of state of El Salvador” (page 88).  “With the departure of Morazán the story of the first federation comes to a close…The Morazanistas and Federalistas were defeated, quiet and everywhere out of power.  Carrera was able to establish his puppets in El Salvador” (page 89).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El Concejo Municipal de San Salvador…asumió el Gobierno [el 5 de abril de 1840] por abandono del Poder Supremo del Gobernante Licenciado José María Silva, quien determinó acompañar al General Francisco Morazán, cuando éste abandonó El Salvador…junto con muchos de sus seguidores.  Este Concejo Municipal de San Salvador, entregó el Mando Supremo, al Dr. y Coronel Antonio José Cañas, el 7 de abril de 1840” (page 53).  “Doctor y Coronel Antonio José Cañas (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Consejero:  7 de Abril de 1840 al 20 de Septiembre de 1840” (page 55).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 4, 1840—“El General Francisco Morazán…expone su renuncia de la Presidencia de El Salvador, y su resolución de salir del país” (page 289).  Abril 15, 1840—“El Consejero designado, Coronel Antonio José Cañas, se hace cargo del Gobierno de El Salvador…Abril 24, 1840—El Jefe del Estado Coronel Antonio José Cañas, convoca a elecciones de Diputados a la Constituyente” (page 290).

May

Bonilla 2000b:  “Una delegación negociadora guatemalteca llegó a San Salvador el 13 de mayo, encabezada por el mismo Carrera y 200 soldados para imponer la firma de un tratado de paz.  Sobresale la imposición de Francisco Malespín como comandante del Ejército.  Este nombramiento ocasionó inestabilidad política en el futuro” (page 134).

June

Monterey 1977:  Junio 23, 1840—“En la ciudad de San Salvador inaugura sus sesiones la Asamblea Constituyente” (page 291).

September

Bonilla 2000a:  “1840.  En septiembre, Francisco Malesín impone como Jefe del Estado a Norberto Ramírez (1840-1841)” (page 112).

Bonilla 2000b:  “Malespín organizó una sublevación, el 20 de septiembre, para presionar el retiro de Antonio José Cañas” (page 134).

Figeac 1938:  “Un cuartelazo que inesperadamente estalló en San Salvador el 14 de septiembre de 1840 y que por cierto no alcanzó todo el éxito esperado por los traidores, decidió al conspícuo don Antonio José Cañas a depositar la jefatura del Estado en el ciudadano don Norberto Ramírez” (page 139).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado Norberto Ramírez (nicaragüense) gobernó como Senador:  del 20 de septiembre de 1840 al 7 de enero de 1841…El 20 de septiembre de 1840, estalló una sublevación en los cuarteles de San Salvador, contra el Gobierno del Coronel Antonio José Cañas; sublevación fomentada por el Comandante General del Ejército, General Francisco Malespín, porque el Coronel Cañas no se prestaba a ser su instrumento en la Administración” (page 57).

Marure 1895:  “Septiembre 20—La guarnición de la ciudad de San Salvador, excitada por su mismo Comandante, se subleva contra el Jefe del Estado, señor Antonio José Cañas, y desconoce su autoridad.  Tres días después de este suceso, Cañas, honrándose con un acto de noble desprendimiento, deposita el mando en el Ldo. Norberto Ramírez, llamado por la ley á sucederle” (page 125).

December

Figeac 1938:  Ramírez “tomó la dirección del gobierno...(C)uando menos lo esperaba, se alborotaron los indios de Santiago Nonualco contra su autoridad.  Esta sublevación...se inició el 10 de diciembre” (page 139).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En diciembre de 1840 estalló una asonada en Santiago Nonualco, encabezada por Petronilo Castro, la que fue reprimida por el Gobierno” (page 57).

1841

Taplin 1972: “January 31, 1841.  The National Assembly formally declared the separation of El Salvador from the Central American Federation.   February 8, 1841.  Salvador approved a new constitution; promulgated April 11, 1841.  Congress to consist of the House of Representatives, chosen annually; and the Senate, elected one-half every second year; to meet on January 1st of each year; sessions were limited to 40 days.  The President elected for two-year term without the privilege of two terms in succession; must receive an absolute majority of votes, otherwise Congress should choose one of the two candidates having the largest number of votes” (page 99).

January

Bonilla 2000b:  “Cañas presentó su renuncia y se nombró como jefe Provisorio a Juan Lindo, el 7 de enero de 1841.  Como suplente quedó José María Cornejo, quien de esta forma retornaba a la política salvadoreña” (page 135).

Figeac 1938:  Ramírez tries to return the presidency to Cañas but he refuses.  “(L)a Asamblea Constituyente se instaló el 4 de enero de 1841 y en sus primeras sesiones resolvió admitir las renuncias de referencia, llamando al poder al hondureño don Juan Lindo” (page 140).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado Juan Lindo (hondureño) gobernó como Jefe Provisorio:  7 enero de 1841 al 20 de junio 1841” (page 59).

Marure 1895:  “Enero 30—La Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador, en acuerdo de esta fecha, manda que en lo sucesivo aquel Estado se denomine ‘República de San Salvador.’  Nunca, empero, llegó á usarse de semejante denominación ni por la misma Asamblea” (page 127).

Monterey 1977:  Enero 7, 1841—“La Asamblea Constituyente de El Salvador…admite al Coronel Antonio José Cañas, la renuncia formal que hace de Jefe Provisional del Estado…Se nombra en su lugar, Jefe Provisional…al señor Licenciado Juan Lindo” (page 296).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Se creó un poder legislativo bicameral, con una cámara de diputados y otra de senadores.  Los diputados elegidos para períodos de un año y los senadores para seis (art. 16)…El ejecutivo sería ejercido por un presidente electo cada dos años (art. 42)…(P)or esta Constitución los jefes de Estado pasaron a llamarse presidentes” (page 135).

Ching 1997:  In the 1841 constitution suffrage “was made universal for all men over the age of twenty-one…Elections for municipal officials…remained indirect, and although national elections were made direct, candidates for national-level office had to meet certain wealth requirements.  Deputies and Senators to the National Assembly had to prove possession of 500 and 4,000 ‘pesos’ respectively, and the President and Vice President had to own at least 8,000 ‘pesos’ each” (page 52).  “The Constitution of 1841…stipulated that the president had to choose his governor from a list of candidates sent to him by the officials of the cabacera, effectively giving them control over the selection process.  Presidents often disobeyed the rule by ignoring the list…Not until the 1910s and 1920s did presidents commonly assign outsiders to a department’s ranking posts” (pages 164-165).  Discusses how presidents used their appointments. 

Elam 1968:  “The constitution of 1841, in effect until 1864, provided the president with the authority to use troops and the congress with the power to raise them for the defense of the nation.  The armed forces were declared apolitical.  Active officers were prohibited from serving in congress, though no such prohibition was applied to the presidency.  A more serious omission, however, was the failure to provide the chief executive with the powers of commander-in-chief.  As a consequence, civilian presidents often found themselves wholly dependent upon the country’s senior officer” (page 4).

Gamero Q. 2000:  “La Constitución de 1841 establece en el Organo Legislativo el bicameralismo.  El territorio se divide en departamentos y distritos” (page 123).  Gives guidelines for the election of senators and representatives, the requirements for candidacy, and the frequency of elections. 

Krennerich 2005:  “The constitution of 1841 stated that the president and parliament were to be elected directly.  However…political development of El Salvador was characterized by power struggles between the regional caudillos, who often resorted to violence as a means of solving political conflicts.  The position of president changed hands frequently and irregularly” (page 269).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 2, 1841—“La Asamblea Constituyente decreta declarando a El Salvador República soberana e independiente y reasumiendo la soberanía nacional” (page 297).  Febrero 18, 1841—“La Asamblea Constituyente emite la Segunda Constitución Política de El Salvador, que sustituye a la del doce de junio de 1824.  Establece el período presidencial por el término de dos años, declarando prohibida la reelección.  Emite la Ley Reglamentaria de Elecciones de Autoridades Supremas” (pages 298-299).

Parker 1981: “A new constitution was adopted in February 1841 still providing for existence as a state in a union, though an assembly the month before had called the state the republic of El Salvador.  A two-house legislature was to be chosen by democratic processes and presidential elections were to be held every second year; but affairs were not regularized immediately” (page 149).

April

Marure 1895:  “Abril 11—Se verificó en la ciudad capital de El Salvador la jura solemne de la nueva Constitución de aquel Estado, decretada en 18 de febrero del mismo año de 41” (pages 127-128).

June

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Licenciado Juan Lindo (hondureño) gobernó…como Jefe Supremo:  28 junio 1841 al 1o febrero de 1842” (page 59).  “Don Pedro Arce y Fagoaga (salvadoreño) gobernó como Senador Designado:  20 al 28 de junio de 1841” (page 71).

September

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 1, 1841—“El Supremo Gobierno de El Salvador convoca extraordinariamente a la Asamblea y Senado a sesiones extraordinarias” (page 301).

October

Monterey 1977:  Octubre 1841—“Movimientos revolucionarios en San Salvador y San Miguel, con el objeto de proclamar Jefe de la República, al General Licenciado Nicolás Espinoza” (page 302).

November

Marure 1895:  “Noviembre 6—Son disueltas las cámaras legislativas de El Salvador y deportados varios de sus miembros por orden del Jefe de aquel Estado, Ldo. Señor Juan Lindo, quien en seguida decretó la convocatoria de otras nuevas cámaras é hizo ante ellas dimisión del mando.  Dieron merito á estas providencias violentas las sospechas de que los Diputados y Senadores expulsos trabajaban por restablecer las cosas al estado que tenían antes de la emigración del ex-Presidente Morazán” (pages 128-129).

Monterey 1977:  Noviembre 12, 1841—“El Presidente Lindo convoca a los ciudadanos para que el siguiente domingo del inmediato diciembre, procedan a la elección de Diputados a la Cámara Legislativa y la de los Senadores que deben reemplazar a los…[que] fueron expulsados por estar complicados en la conspiración de octubre” (page 303).

December

Ching 1997:  In “the presidential election of December 1841, one of three elections held that year [May, August, December], multiple candidates participated in the election, suggesting that no single boss was able to establish unmitigated supremacy” (page 179).

1842

Bonilla 2000b:  “1842.  Se erige la diocesis de San Salvador y se nombra obispo a Jorge de Viteri y Ungo” (page 144).

Ching 1997:  “Between 1824 and 1842 El Salvador participated in 40 inter-state battles” (page 150).

Lauria-Santiago 1999:  “In 1842 civil war broke out again as opposition to President Lindo grew. An attack on the garrison by residents of San Salvador’s poor neighborhoods contributed to Lindo’s removal” (page 113).

January

Monterey 1977:  Enero 1842—“Conmociones revolucionarias…contra el Gobierno presidido por el Lic. Juan Lindo, debidas a los abusos administrativos y las arbitrariedades cometidas contra los miembros de la Asamblea Legislativa, el Senado y la Corte Suprema de Justicia” (page 304).  Enero 27, 1842—“Se instala en la ciudad de San Vicente el Congreso Legislativo, el cual…convoca a los pueblos para la elección de Presidente y Vice-Presidente de la República” (page 305).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Morazán regresó, desembarcó en el Puerto de La Unión el 15 de febrero de 1842.  El gobierno del Presidente Guzmán declaró movilización general para impedir su retorno…La forma como en El Salvador se vivió el regreso y muerte de Morazán es sorprendente y casi desconocida porque se piensa que Morazán fue siempre muy popular para los salvadoreños; empero se olvida que el culto morazánico comenzó con la administración de Gerardo Barrios” (page 135).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Escolástico Marín (salvadoreño) gobernó como Senador:  1o de febrero al 12 de abril de 1842” (page 63).

Monterey 1977:  Febrero 1, 1842—“Por no haber mayoría absoluta de votos a favor de los candidatos, la Asamblea Legislativa elige al Coronel don Antonio José Cañas como Presidente Constitucional de El Salvador, y como Suplentes, a los ciudadanos Lic. Juan José Guzmán, José María Cornejo y José María Campo Pomar.  Por no haber aceptado el Coronel don Antonio José Cañas por sus enfermedades y avanzada edad, la Asamblea nombra al Lic. Juan José Guzmán por haber sido designado en el sorteo de ley; y mientras dure la ausencia del Lic. Guzmán, nombra al Brigadier Escolástico Marín.  El Presidente Provisorio, Lic. Juan Lindo, ocurre a la Asamblea Nacional y manifiesta qu el día anterior habia terminado el período legal de su nombramiento como Presidente de la República; que, en consecuencia, debe depositar el Mando Supremo en un Consejero por falta de Presidente, por lo cual deposita en el Consejero General Escolástico Marín” (page 305).

March

Anderson 1981:  “At Chinandega, Nicaragua, in March 1842, representatives of Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua met together, although Guatemala and Costa Rica refused to attend” (page 5).

April

Figeac 1938:  “El 14 de abril, coincidiendo con la victoria obtenida por los liberales en Costa Rica, tomó posesión de la jefatura de El Salvador, el licenciado don Juan José Guzmán, habiendo sido trasladada pocos días antes, de San Vicente a San Salvador, la sede de las autoridades supremas del Estado” (page 144).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General y licenciado Juan José Guzmán (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente:  13 abril al 30 de junio de 1842” (page 67).

Monterey 1977:  Abril 14, 1842—“El Consejero Licenciado Juan José Guzmán se hace cargo de la Presidencia de El Salvador, en sustitución del Senador Escolástico Marín” (page 309).

June

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Dionisio Villacorta (salvadoreño) gobernó como Senador:  30 de junio al 19 de julio de 1842…Este período fue de transición, durante el cual don Dionisio Villacorta convocó a elecciones para Presidente y Vice-Presidente de la República” (page 65).

July

Anderson 1981:  “In July of [1842], the three countries [Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua] signed a pact of confederation” (page 5).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Escolástico Marín (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Senador:  19 de julio al 26 de septiembre de 1842…El 19 de julio de 1842 el General Escolástico Marín recibe el Gobierno de don Dionisio Villacorta” (page 63).

Monterey 1977:  Julio 28, 1842—“El Consejero Presidente, Lic. Juan José Guzmán, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Designado Senador don Dionisio Villacorta” (page 312).

September

Alcántara Sáez 1998:  “La Iglesia tuvo un poder notable, a pesar de que no era tan rica como la de Guatemala, pero se vio beneficiada por la creación en 1842 de la diócesis de San Salvador; los comerciantes de añil desempeñaron un papel predominante, y la tónica política general era de un fuerte conservadurismo, en el que los Presidentes de paja del guatemalteco Carrera se alternaron en el poder bajo el teórico imperio de la Constitución de 1841” (page 130).

Figeac 1938:  Morazán is executed by the conservatives in Costa Rica on September 15, 1842 (page 145).  “Cinco días después de la criminal ejecución del general Morazán, en San Salvador era designados por la Asamblea Legislativa, presidente y vice-presidente de la República, el licenciado don Juan José Guzmán y el doctor don Antonio José Cañas, para un nuevo período” (page 146).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El General Francisco Morazán…murió fusilado a los 50 años de edad en San José, Costa Rica el 15 de Septiembre de 1842” (page 47).  “General y licenciado Juan José Guzmán (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Presidente Constitucional:  26 septiembre de 1842 al 26 de enero de 1843” (page 67).

Llanes 1995:  “A Salvadorian diocese was established by Rome on 30 September 1842” (page 42).

Monterey 1977:  Septiembre 7, 1842—“El Senador Presidente don Dionisio Villacorta, depositó el Mando Supremo en el Consejero Licenciado Juan José Guzmán, quien inaugural un gobierno de conciliación…y convoca a los pueblos para las elecciones de Presidente y Vice-Presidente de la República de El Salvador, por la renuncia del Coronel Antonio José Cañas…Septiembre 20, 1842—La Cámara Legislativa, por no haber mayoría de sufragios…designa como Presidente Constitucional del Estado de El Salvador, electo por la Asamblea General, al Licenciado Juan José Guzmán, y como Suplente en la Presidencia, al Coronel Antonio José Cañas” (page 313).  Septiembre 30, 1842—“La Asamblea Legislativa acepta la renuncia que el Coronel Antonio José Cañas, hace como Suplente y designa como Suplente del Presidente del Estado, al señor don Pedro Arce” (page 314).

Vidal 1970: On September 20, 1842 the National Assembly announces the election of Juan J. Guzmán as president (page 249).

October

Bonilla 2000b:  A los “partidarios sobrevivientes a la tragedia [de Morazán] se les permitió regresar a El Salvador por tratado firmado entre el gobierno costarricense y el gobierno salvadoreño, el 15 de octubre de 1842.  Este grupo formó una poderosa facción donde destacó Gerardo Barrios.  Estas facciones representaban las dos tendencias principales en que se fue diferenciando el liberalismo salvadoreño hasta dividirse en las facciones:  constitucional y absolutista” (page 132).

1843

Bonilla 2000b:  “1843.  Regreso a San Salvador de los partidarios de Morazán en el barco ‘Coquimbo’” (page 144).

January

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Don Pedro Arce y Fagoaga (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Vice-Presidente:  26 enero al 8 de marzo de 1843” (page 71).

Monterey 1978:  Enero 23, 1843—“Por grave enfermedad del Presidente, Licenciado Juan José Guzmán, se hace cargo del Poder Ejecutivo, el Suplente, don Pedro Arce” (page 13).

March

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General y licenciado Juan José Guzmán (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Presidente:  8 de marzo de 1843 al 31 enero de 1844” (page 67).

Monterey 1978:  Marzo 28, 1843—“La Cámara de Senadores decreta convocando a los ciudadanos salvadoreños para elegir el Presidente que deba ejercer el Poder Ejecutivo del Estado en los años de 1844 y 1845, hasta el día último de enero.  Las elecciones deben verificarse el primer domingo de diciembre del presente año” (page 14).

September

Bonilla 2000b:  “El Obispo Viteri comenzó a desestabilizar el sistema político utilizando la fuerza de Malespín para la supresión de los periódicos, y posteriormente contribuyó al derrocamiento de Juan José Guzmán” (page 137).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En septiembre de 1843 el día 25 llega a San Salvador el Obispo Dr. Jorge Viteri y Ungo…El Obispo Viteri había sido propuesto por el Gobierno de El Salvador a Su Santidad.  En este tercer período le correspondió gobernar al Presidente Guzmán en un ambiente de intrigas políticas por ambiciones del Poder.  El Gral. Francisco Malespín conspiraba por llegar a gobernar y el Obispo Viteri y Ungo por governar al Gobernante” (page 68).

Llanes 1995:  “The first duly elected bishop of El Salvador was Jorge de Viteri.  Viteri, in the style of Archbishop Casaus, tried to rule over the affairs of the state.  He opposed Salvadorian President Juan José Guzmán for granting asylum to remnant forces of Morazán.  Viteri was successful in mounting public opposition to Guzmán and public support for Conservative Malespín” (page 42).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 10, 1843—“El Comandante Militar, General Francisco Malespín, depone del Mando Supremo al Lic. Juan José Guzmán…Diciembre 20, 1843—El Vice-Presidente don Pedro Arce asume la Presidencia de la República, llamado por el Comandante Militar General Malespín…Se efectúan las elecciones para Presidente del Estado de El Salvador, habiendo obtenido votos el General Francisco Malespín y otros más” (page 22).

1844

January

Figeac 1938:  “En cuanto el licenciado Juan José Guzmán bajó del poder público a los remansos de la vida privada, el vice-presidente constitucional don Pedro Arce convocó con fecha 16 de enero de 1844 a la Asamblea Legislativa y ésta abrió sus sesiones el 30 del mismo mes, bajo la presidencia de don Victoriano Nuila.  Acaban de verificarse elecciones para designar popularmente al substituto del licenciado Guzmán, pero como ninguno de los candidatos obtuviera mayoría absoluta, la Asamblea Nacional eligió en su sesión del 7 de febrero, como presidente de la República, al general Francisco Malespín” (page 153).

Monterey 1978:  Enero 1844—“Se efectúan en El Salvador las elecciones de Autoridades Supremas, bajo la presión del Comandante Militar, General Francisco Malespín…Enero 31, 1844—Las Cámaras Legislativas, considerando que el período constitucional concluye este día, designa para que se haga cargo del Poder Ejecutivo interinamente, mientras se declara quien sea electo, al Senador don Fermín Palacios” (page 24).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Se convocó a elecciones y fueron ganadas por Malespín el 5 de febrero de 1844” (page 137).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El Presidente Guzmán entrega el Mando a don Fermín Palacios el 1o de febrero de 1844” (page 68).  “General Francisco Malespín (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente:  febrero 7 al 9 mayo de 1844” (page 73).  “El 7 de febrero de 1844 fue elegido Presidente de la República [Francisco Malespín], con ayuda de la influencia del Obispo Jorge Viteri y Ungo, pues el General Malespín era ahijado suyo” (page 73).

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 1, 1844—“El Senador don Fermín Palacios asume el Mando Supremo.  Febrero 5, 1844—Por no haber mayoría absoluta de sufragios a favor de los candidatos, la Asamblea Legislativa, influenciada por el Ilmo. Obispo Viteri, elige al General Francisco Malespín como Presidente Constitucional de El Salvador; y como Vice-Presidente al ciudadano Luis Ayala…Febrero 7, 1844—Toma posesión del Mando Supremo el General Francisco Malespín” (page 24).

March

Anderson 1981:  “(A) [confederated] government was established in San Vicente, El Salvador, on 29 March 1844.  This was designed to create a federal government with a president elected for a four-year term, but within a year the plan had fallen through” (page 5).

Bonilla 2000b:  “(E)l 29 de marzo, fue instalado el gobierno confederado con sede en San Vicente” (page 137).

Figeac 1938:  “Según decreto legislativo fechado a 4 de marzo de 1844, se permitió la reapertura de los conventos y monasterios” (page 154).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Marzo de 1844 la Asamblea Legislativa decreta restableciendo el fuero eclesiástico al Clero de El Salvador, bajo la autoridad eclesiástica, inmunidad de que fue privado por el Art. 113 de la ley del 26 de agosto de 1830 que suprime dicho fuero” (page 74).

April

Monterey 1978:  Abril 25, 1844—“Las Cámaras Legislativas convocan a los pueblos de El Salvador a elecciones de diputados para reforma la Constitución emitida el 18 de febrero de 1841, a solicitud hecha en cabildo abierto, Constituyente que no se llevó a cabo” (page27).

May

Figeac 1938:  “El Salvador estaba en pie de guerra y como Malespín lograra organizar un formidable ejército para invadir Guatemala, el 9 de mayo depositó el mando en el vice-presidente don Joaquín Eufrasio Guzmán” (page 155).

June

Bonilla 2000b:  “Al regresar Malespín a San Salvador nombró a Barrios Jefe militar de San Miguel, donde junto a Cabañas comenzó a conspirar el derrocamiento de Malespín” (page 138).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “General Francisco Malespin (salvadoreño) gobernó…16 junio a 25 de octubre de 1844” (page 73).

September

Figeac 1938:  “(E)l 5 de septiembre del mismo año de 1844, estalló una revolución en la ciudad de San Miguel, encabezada por el general Trinidad Cabañas” (page 156).

October

Monterey 1978:  Octubre 25, 1844—“El Presidente General Francisco Malespín, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Vice Presidente, General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, y la Comandancia General del Ejército, en su hermano General Calixto Malespín, con el objeto de ponerse al mando de las tropas que combatirán al Gobierno de Nicaragua” (page 33).

1845

Ching 1997:  In 1845 the “regime of Francisco Malespin finally had been overthrown after much war and bloodshed, and now General Joaquín Eufrasio Guzmán of San Miguel was in power” (page 166).

Munro 1967: “The Liberals were able to return to power in 1845, after a bloody struggle in which Malespín, although now estranged from Carrera, was assisted by the government of Honduras” (page 102).

Taplin 1972: “The legislature convened in Salvador February 15, 1845, declared Malespín’s election void” (page 99).  “Vice-president [Guzmán] took executive authority October 25, 1844 [and] held power until February 1, 1846, when Malespín’s term would have ended” (page 100).

Vidal 1970: Vice president General Joaquín Guzmán overthrows the government (page 257).  “El Congreso decretó nulo la elección de Malespín” (page 258).

White 1973:  In 1845, “the Vice President, General Joaquín Guzmán, whom the conservative President Malespín had left in charge to go to fight against the liberals in Nicaragua, carried off a ‘coup’ against him; Guzmán had previously fought on the liberal side, and now once more co-operated with that party” (page 70).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “Estando Malespín en [Nicaragua]; el Vicepresidente Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán derrocó a Malespín el 2 de febrero de 1845, con el apoyo de Barrios y Cabañas, con lo que retornaron al poder en El Salvador los partidarios de Morazán” (page 138).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 23 de febrero de 1845 el Obispo Dr. Jorge Viteri y Ungo, fulmina excomunión mayor en la Catedral de San Salvador, contra el General Francisco Malespín, por la fusilación del Presbítero Pedro Crespín” (page 74).  “Don Fermín Palacios (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Senador:  16 Febrero al 25 Abril de 1845” (page 77).

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 2, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente, Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, influenciado por su yerno, Coronel Gerardo Barrios y el General Trinidad Cabañas,…declara que asume el Mando Supremo…El Municipio de San Salvador desconoce al Presidente Francisco Malespín y se adhiere al nuevo Gobierno, lo mismo que las demás municipalidades del país” (page 40).  Febrero 7, 1845—“El General Francisco Malespín, como Presidente de El Salvador y General en Jefe del Ejército aliado de El Salvador y Honduras, decreta reasumiendo el mando de la República de El Salvador, y declara traidor al Vice-Presidente, Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán…Febrero 15, 1845—La Asamblea Legislativa de El Salvador declara nula la elección de Presidente de la República hecha en el General Francisco Malespín, por haberse efectuado contra lo prescrito expresamente por la ley” (page 41).  Febrero 16, 1845—“Las Cámaras Legislativas designan al Senador Fermín Palacios para que ejerza el Poder Ejecutivo del Estado durante la ausencia del Vice-Presidente, Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán.  El Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador don Fermín Palacios…Febrero 26, 1845—Los Gobiernos de Costa Rica, Nicaragua y Guatemala, reconocen al Gobierno del Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán” (page 42).

March

Monterey 1978:  Marzo 19, 1845—“En Nacaome el Gobierno de Honduras da a reconocer al General Francisco Malespín como Segundo Jefe del Ejército aliado que se formó para invadir a El Salvador y reponerle en el mando de Presidente de El Salvador” (page 43).

April

Monterey 1978:  Abril 14, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente Coronel Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, asume el Mando Supremo, que había depositado en el Senador, General Fermín Palacios, para ponerse al frente de las tropas que combatirían al Presidente Francisco Malespín en San Miguel” (page 44).

May

Monterey 1978:  Mayo 24, 1845—“Considerando que el día primero del año proximo concluye el período constitucional para el ejercicio de la Presidencia del Estado, la Asamblea Legislativa convoca a los ciudadanos salvadoreños a elegir un Presidente, para que ejerza el Poder Ejecutivo del Estado de El Salvador en los años de 1846 y 1847, hasta el día último de enero de 1848.  Las elecciones deben efectuarse el primer domingo del próximo diciembre” (page 47).

August

Monterey 1978:  Agosto 7, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador don Fermín Palacios, para ir a combatir a las fuerzas invasoras hondureñas” (page 50).

September

Monterey 1978:  Septiembre 23, 1845—“El Vice-Presidente General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, asume el Mando Supremo que había depositado en el Senador don Fermín Palacios” (page 52).

1846

Browning 1971:  “A decree of 1846 gave preferential treatment to [coffee] production:  any person who planted more than five thousand bushes was exempted from municipal taxes for a ten-year period; those working on a coffee estate were exempted from military service; and coffee produced during an initial seven-year period was not liable to export duties” (page 157).  “The expansion of coffee production…led to an improvement and reorientation of the country’s transport system” (page 163).  “The changes to the country’s landscape caused by expanding coffee plantations and the construction of roads, railways and ports, were the most obvious results of the introduction of large-scale farming…More important…were the changed attitudes towards the land” (page 165).  “(C)ommercial coffee farming, introduced rapidly and on a large scale, made immediate and pressing demands on the existing pattern of land use and ownership” (page 166).  “(M)any of the land-holding village communities did make a considerable effort to adapt themselves to the new situation but…they did not succeed” (page 167).  “(C)offee farming was introduced into the country’s most populated districts where the pattern of the land-holding village community was most strongly developed.  Inevitably there were demands made on the villages by the coffee planters for the areas of common land that were suitable for coffee and early demands for the labour which the village communities could supply…Above all else it was the introduction of coffee that persuaded those in control of the nation’s affairs to reform the use and ownership of the land of El Salvador…That these reforms led to a rapid and dramatic transformation of the entire agrarian structure may be attributed to the complete authority of a small oligarchy in whose interests the changes were made, which, freed from colonial restraints, viewed the nation’s land and people as resources to be used for its own benefit in any ‘form of speculation’ it chose to embark upon” (pages 171-172).

García 1995:  “Malespin was killed in 1846…This occurred during fighting against a Liberal rebellion that had broken out in Nicaragua, precipitating a five-year return of Liberals to power in El Salvador.  Conservatives and Liberals fought regionally and locally until the late nineteenth century, when liberalism finally triumphed throughout the isthmus” (page 38).

February

Bonilla 2000b:  “El 16 de febrero de 1846, la Asamblea del Estado eligió como Presidente al…Dr. Eugenio Aguilar, quien no permitió al obispo Viteri continuar interviniendo en los asuntos del Estado.  Con el Presidente Aguilar irrumpe en la vida política un nuevo estilo de liberalismo, más cercano a su ortodoxia” (page 138).

Ching 1997:  “In February 1846, Senator Fermín Palacios succeeded Guzmán to serve as interim President for three weeks while the National Assembly elected Eugenio Aguilar for the term 1846-48” (page 185).

Figeac 1938:  “Las Cámaras se reunieron el 5 de febrero y el primer asunto que trataron fue el que se refería al nombramiento popular del primer mandatario de la Nación, designación que hicieron las Cámaras en la persona del doctor Eugenio Aguilar por no haber alcanzado mayoría absoluta ninguno de los candidatos presidenciales” (pages 162-163).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “Doctor Eugenio Aguilar (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente electo:  21 de Febrero al 12 de Julio de 1846…Durante este período tuvo que hacerle frente a varias asonadas y a las calumnias del Obispo Viteri, quien incitaba a las autoridades y al pueblo a la rebelión” (page 79).

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 1, 1846—“Por haber terminado el período para el cual fué electo, el Vice-Presidente General Joaquín Eufracio Guzmán, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador Fermín Palacios…Febrero 16, 1846—Se instala en la ciudad de San Salvador la Asamblea Legislativa, por no haber obtenido la mayoría de votos los candidatos en las elecciones de Autoridades Supremas.  La Asamblea Legislativa elige Presidente de El Salvador al Dr. Eugenio Aguilar, y como Vice-Presidente, al señor don José Campo” (page 55).

Vidal 1972: On February 1, 1846 Guzmán transfers the presidency to senator Palacios.  “Se encontraba la República en período eleccionario, siendo varios los candidatos que aspiraban a la primera magistratura.  No hubo elección popular y las Cámaras eligieron Presidente al doctor don Eugenio Aguilar” (pages 263-264).

March

Vidal 1972: “El 5 de marzo de 1846, la Asamblea decretó que la Comandancia General del Ejército, quedaba a cargo del Presidente de la República, poniendo así término a las escisiones entre ambas Altas Autoridades” (page 267). 

July

Bonilla 2000b:  “Después de sus intentos por desestabilizar al Gobierno de Aguilar, el obispo Viteri abandonó San Salvador el 24 de julio de 1846, acusando de ‘irreligioso’ al Presidente Aguilar.  El gobierno, cinco días después de su salida, con claridad y uso del concepto de estado de derecho, a través de decretos legisló la solución del conflicto, por un lado oficializó la expulsión del obispo, bajo los cargos de trastornador del orden público y conspirador contra el Estado; porque se probó su directa intervención en los desordenes callejeros y motines que se dieron en San Salvador; además, modificó el Código Penal, reforzando, con un decreto, el artículo que preveía castigos para los clérigos que provocaran alborotos políticos, valiéndose de su función religiosa” (pages 138-139).

Ching 1997:  “In July, just four months after taking office, Aguilar was deposed in a coup led by Palacios, who had allied with Bishop Viteri y Ungo” (page 185).  “Aguilar launched a counter-coup that forced Palacios to step down.  Bishop Viteri y Ungo fled into exile in Honduras… Aguilar remained in office for the duration of his term” (page 186).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En julio de 1846 el Obispo Viteri y Ungo abandona la Diócesis y se dirigió a Honduras, para unirse al General Francisco Malespín, con quien estaba en relaciones revolucionarias y para tratar de invadir a El Salvador” (page 74).  “Don Fermín Palacios (salvadoreño) gobernó…como Senador:  12 al 21 de Julio de 1846…Su período fue efimero y al día siguiente de haber asumido el Poder, decretó el Estado de Sitio, obligado por las circunstancias cada día más graves, debido a la situación política provocada por el obispo Jorge Viteri y Ungo.  Su espíritu conciliador no logró contener las ambiciones políticas de dicho Obispo.  El 21 de julio de 1846 entregó de nuevo el Poder Supremo al Presidente Dr. Eugenio Aguilar” (page 77).  Aguilara gobernó “como Presidente:  21 de Julio de 1846 al 1o Febrero de 1848” (page 79).  “El 29 de julio de 1846 por Decreto Ejecutivo se prohibe al Obispo Viteri y Ungo regresar al país, declarándolo expulsado del territorio de El Salvador, por su complicidad en los motines de la capital” (page 80).

Llanes 1995:  “Viteri again incited the people against another president, Eugenio Aguilar…Aguilar denied the charges, and Viteri, having failed in his attempt to depose Aguilar, opted to leave the country.  Days later, Aguilar’s government pronounced Viteri a traitor and declared him exiled” (page 43).

Monterey 1978:  Julio 12, 1846—“El señor Presidente Dr. Aguilar contra el parecer de los Jefes Militares y demás vecinos, deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador Fermín Palacios.  Julio 13, 1846—El Senador Presidente Fermín Palacios, decreta el Estado de Sitio en todo el País…Julio 18, 1846—(E)l Dr. Eugenio Aguilar asume el Mando Supremo de El Salvador” (page 61).  Julio 27, 1846—“El Ilustrísimo Obispo Jorge Viteri y Ungo abandona la Diócesis y se dirige a Honduras, para unirse al General Francisco Malespín, con quien estaba en relaciones revolucionarias, y trataba de invadir el país” (page 62).

November

Leistenschneider 1980:  General Francisco Malespin “murió asesinado en el pueblo de San Fernando, Departamento de Chalatenango, el 25 de noviembre de 1846, cuando comandaba una invasión a la República con el objeto de ocupar el Poder Ejecutivo” (page 73).

Monterey 1978:    Noviembre 23, 1846—“Se sublevan los indios de Santiago y San Juan Nonualco…El Gobierno de El Salvador manda una expedición punitiva a los pueblos de los nonualcos, comandada por el Coronel Gerardo Barrios, el cual incendia el pueblo de Santiago de Nonualco y fusila a numerosas personas…Noviembre 25, 1846—[Muere el] General Francisco Malespín” (page 65).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 13, 1846—“El señor Presidente Lic. Eugenio Aguilar, decreta derogando el decreto de Estado de Sitio…y reduciendo el Ejército a solo lo necesario” (page 65).

1847

Wade 2003:  “By the mid-nineteenth century…El Salvador’s once booming trade in indigo declined significantly…Recognizing that the indigo market was shrinking, the search began for a replacement crop…The introduction of coffee in the mid-nineteenth century coincided with the expansion of the state apparatus at a time when Conservatives and Liberals were fighting for political dominance.  Coffee and land were at the heart of the dispute.  In 1847 the Salvadoran legislature passed its first law supporting coffee, offering service exemptions and tax benefits to those who had more than 15,000 trees” (pages 26-27).

February

Monterey 1978:  Febrero 24, 1847—“Decreto Legislativo por el cual se convoca al pueblo salvadoreño para que elija los diputados que lo representen en una Asamblea Nacional Constituyente de Centro América y se comisiona el Poder Ejecutivo para que invite a los otros Estados para la reorganización de Centro América” (page 69).

October

Anderson 1981:  Meetings on confederation “followed at Sonsonate and then at Nacaome, on the Honduras-El Salvador border, resulting in the Pact of Nacaome of October 1847.  Unfortunately, this attempt to reestablish unity was ratified only by Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua.  Carrera disdained participation; and the Costa Ricans, although taking part in the discussions, never ratified the plan, which was thus stillborn” (page 5).

Monterey 1978:  Octubre 7, 1847—“La Dieta de Nacaome acuerda establecer un Gobierno Provisorio y convocar para una Asamblea Constituyente de los tres Estados contratantes [El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua]” (page 73).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 4, 1847—“Se efectuaron en todo el Estado de El Salvador, las elecciones de Presidente, Diputados y Senadores, resultando electo Presidente del Estado don Doroteo Vasconcelos” (page 74).

1848

January

Presidential election (Vasconcelos / Liberal)

Monterey 1978:  Enero 29, 1848—“La Asamblea Legislativa declara electo popularmente como Presidente Constitucional del Estado de El Salvador, para el período de 1848 a 1849, al Sr. don Doroteo Vasconcelos, quien a pesar de haber renunciado, la Asamblea se niega a admitirle la renuncia; fué designado por la suerte como Vice-Presidente al Lic. Félix Quiroz” (page 76).

February

Leistenschneider 1980:  “El 1o de febrero de 1848 el Presidente Aguilar deposita el Mando Supremo en el Senador don Tomás Medina” (page 80).  “Don Doroteo Vasconcelos (salvadoreño) gobernó como Presidente:  7 febrero de 1848 al 26 enero de 1850” (page 87).  “Licenciado Félix Quiroz (mexicano) gobernó como Vice-Presidente:  3 al 7 de febrero de 1848…Su período fue de transición.  Recibió el Gobierno de don Tomás Medina…el 3 de febrero de 1848 y el 7 del mismo mes y año lo entregó a don Doroteo Vasconcelos” (page 93).

1849

March

Bonilla 2000b:  Doroteo Vasconcelos “al término de su gestión promovió su reelección, para lo cual reformó la Constitución el 9 de marzo de 1849.  Deseaba otro mandato constitucional de dos años para reconstruir Centroamérica.  Francisco Dueñas y el Coronel Nicolás Angulo se opusieron a esta reforma, alegando que se quebrantaba el ordenamiento constitucional” (page 140).

Figeac 1938:  “Don Doroteo Vasconcelos se portó a la altura del deber patriótico en el primer período de su Administración, pero cometió un grave e imperdonable error:  permitió que lo reeligieran para un segundo período presidencial.  La Constitución Política entonces vigente, prohibía en su artículo 44 la reelección del presidente de la República, y para dar el paso apuntado se dispuso la reforma [de 9 de marzo de 1849 de la Cámara de Senadores]” (page 171).

Leistenschneider 1980:  “En marzo de 1849 la Asamblea Legislativa reforma el Art. 44 de la Constitución Nacional, el cual fijaba el período presidencial para dos años, prohibiendo la reelección; la reforma permite la reelección de Presidente por una sola vez” (page 88).

Monterey 1978:  Marzo 17, 1849—“La Asamblea Legislativa…convoca a los pueblos a elecciones de Presidente del Estado, Diputados y Senadores” (page 85).

December

Monterey 1978:  Diciembre 1849—“Se efectúan en el Estado de El Salvador las elecciones de Autoridades Superiores; fué reelecto el Presidente don Doroteo Vasconcelos” (page 93).  “Se presentaron como principales candidatos a la Presidencia de la República, los señores Doroteo Vasconcelos y Lic. Francisco Dueñas” (page 94).