What Do You Think? Exhibit

View of canvases on wall where students posted their op-eds

What Do You Think?
Geisel Library building, main floor, west wing

At a time when media are being discredited as purveyors of “fake news” and labeled as “the enemy of the people”, it is critical to remember the importance of fact-based civic debate for our democracies.  The “What Do You Think?” exhibit was created by students in Professor Fernando Dominguez Rubio’s Communication 10: Communication and Democracy class this past Spring Quarter. What you see here is a wall filled with students’ voices defending their arguments and political views on issues as diverse as media bias, gender equality, election results and racial discrimination.  This wall is a demonstration that it is possible to hold strong views and generate civic discourse based on facts, reasons, and arguments, rather than on accusations, falsities, and insults.

We invite you to read the wall and we challenge you to contribute to the conversation by leaving your own responses. Join the conversation!

The exhibit is located in the Geisel Library building, main floor, west wing.

East Commons Stress Free Zone Is Open During Finals Week

At the end of each quarter the UC San Diego Library hosts the Stress Free Zone to facilitate relaxation and provide snacks during first three days of finals week. Join us on June 12, 13, and 14 in the East Commons (Floor 2) from 7:00 – 9:00 pm (or until the food is gone). Audrey’s Café is partnering with the Library to provide free coffee to students in addition to the Library’s snacks and fresh fruit assortment. While coffee and snacks will be served only at night, de-stressing activities are available all day in the East Commons. Visit library.ucsd.edu/spaces/places-to-study/de-stress/ for more details. In addition to the permanent installations of the walk stations, chess, Quoridor, and scrabble gaming tables, the Library has foam rollers to stretch muscles and to help release tension.

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist Eric Lichtblau to Discuss “The Nazis Next Door”

When World War II came to a close in 1945, the U.S. Government recruited a few leading German scientists, who it judged could contribute to America’s space and military programs. In addition, the rationale was that if the government hadn’t done this, these top scientists, along with their scientific knowledge and military secrets, would have been swept up by the Soviet Union. Journalist Eric Lichtblau, uncovers a series of much more disconcerting findings in his 2014 book, The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men, which reveals that the U.S. allowed approximately 10,000 Nazis—some of whom were directly involved in heinous and genocidal acts—to immigrate and take up residence in the U.S.

Lichtblau, a veteran investigative reporter with CNN, will be the featured speaker at the Wednesday, June 7 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW), a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program. The June 7 event is sponsored by William & Michelle Lerach, and will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Price Center East Ballroom on the UC San Diego campus. The event is free and open to the public, and will be preceded by a 4:30 p.m. reception. Reservations must be made in advance; to reserve tickets click here.

Investigative Journalist, Eric Lichtblau

Lichtblau recently joined CNN, as a member of its investigative team, where he has been a lead reporter covering recent events related to the Trump campaign, its ties to Russia, and the recent firing of FBI Director James Comey. Before joining CNN’s Washington bureau, Lichtblau was a reporter for The New York Times, where he has covered national security, money-and-politics, law enforcement, and other national issues, since 2002. Previously, he spent 15 years as an investigative and legal affairs reporter at the Los Angeles Times. Lichtblau has been the recipient of numerous awards for his work, and in 2006, he won the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting—with James Risen—for breaking the story of the secret wiretapping program authorized by President Bush, weeks after the September 11 attacks. The story and follow-up articles triggered a national debate about the balance between national security and civil liberties, and led to a rewriting of federal intelligence law. He has also written investigative pieces on political corruption scandals, the Wikileaks files, and the Edward Snowden-NSA revelations. Read more…

Genre and Theory: Strategies Toward Better Writing and Publishing in the Current Environment

Please join us for a lecture with Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director of Duke University Press and director of the Intellectual Publics Program at City University of New York (CUNY). Mr. Wissoker will discuss changes in publishing and the academy, how to navigate them and will outline how to write a scholarly book. In addition, he will explore the many differences between research presented in dissertation form versus a book and share concrete tips on making changes in form, style, content, and intended audience.

Monday, May 22, 2017

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Ken Wissoker

Ken Wissoker, a renowned editor in scholarly publishing, is a noted speaker and consultant on all aspects of academic publishing and the contemporary intellectual landscape. He has been involved in the publishing industry since 1979 and has been Editorial Director at Duke University Press since 1997. In the fall of 2014 he also joined the CUNY Graduate Center as director of their new “Intellectual Publics” program. At CUNY Ken presents public conversations that facilitate thinking and debate across the disciplines while continuing in his role at Duke University Press.

This lecture is free and open to the public and sponsored by the UC San Diego Ethnic Studies Department, the UC San Diego Library, the UC San Diego Institute for Arts and Humanities, and the UC San Diego Anthropology Department.

For more information contact Mariah Fellows at mfellows@ucsd.edu.

Library Partners with OMA to Exhibit Works by Artist Ted Meyer

Broken Back; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

A sampling of the works from artist Ted Meyer’s intriguing Scarred for Life series will be on display, beginning May 15 through September 1, 2017, in the Biomedical Library Building breezeway. The exhibit and an opening reception on May 15 are a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and Oceanside Museum of Art, which is holding a major exhibition of the artist’s work—Ted Meyer: Scarred for Life— from May 27 through September 17, 2017.

At the May 15 reception, Ted Meyer will talk about his work and some of the fascinating human stories behind it. Members and staff from Oceanside Museum of Art will also be in attendance and will discuss the OMA exhibition. The event is free and open to the public and will be held on Monday, May 15 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Biomedical Library Building.

Ted Meyer is a nationally recognized artist, curator and patient advocate, who helps patients, students, and medical professionals see the positive, in the worst life can offer. Meyer’s personal experience with Gaucher Disease, a rare genetic disorder that he was born with, has served as his artistic motivation in creating his 18-year project “Scarred for Life: Mono-prints of Human Scars.” In his work, he chronicles the trauma and courage of people who have lived through serious accidents and health crises. Those stories are told through graphic, yet beautiful depictions of people’s suddenly altered bodies and the resulting scars. Meyer’s artistically-enhanced monoprints—taken directly from scarred skin— are accompanied by a photographic portrait and a written story by his subject. Each tells a unique and intriguing story of resilience and healing.

Brain Cancer; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

Meyer, whose art has been displayed at museums and other venues both nationally and internationally, is currently the Artist in Residence at the USC Keck School of Medicine, where he curates exhibitions of artwork by patients. The portraits of patients are incorporated into the medical school’s curriculum, teaching future doctors to see their patients as complex human beings.

UC San Diego Library contact: Scott Paulson, spaulson@ucsd.edu.

More information about the artist: tedmeyer.com.

More information about Oceanside Museum of Art exhibition: oma-online.org/meyer.

Register today for the June 7 Holocaust Living History Workshop with Eric Lichtblau

Scarred For Life: An Exhibition of Works by Ted Meyer

Biomedical Library Exhibition

May 15, 2017 – July 31, 2017    Biomedical Library Building, 1st floor Breezeway

Opening Reception with Artist Ted Meyer

Monday, May 15, 2017     3:00 – 5:00 PM    Biomedical Library Building

“It isn’t just a scar. It’s my scar”

After years of doing work about his own rare illness, and becoming bored by his personal situation, artist Ted Meyer changed focus and began visually telling the stories of other people who have been through major traumas. For more than 16 years Meyer has been creating a graphic yet beautiful depiction of people’s suddenly altered bodies and the resulting scars in an ever-enlarging collection of artworks entitled, Scarred for Life.

Brain Cancer; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

Scarred for Life continues to grow and now consists of nearly 100 artistically enhanced monoprints taken directly from the scarred skin of his subjects. Each image – accompanied by a photographic portrait taken by Ted and a written story by his subject – tells a unique and intriguing story of medical crisis, resilience and healing. The resulting, ever-expanding presentation of mono-prints, narratives, and photographs has been exhibited nationally and received press coverage in such publications as the New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, as well as NPR and PBS. This exhibition was most recently on display at Saint John the Divine in New York City and National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring Maryland.

The opening reception at the Biomedical Library is free and open to the public. No RSVP required. For more information about the event, please contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu.

Open heart surgery at one month – ventricle septic defect; Photo Credit: tedmeyer.com

A related exhibit of the artist’s work will be on display at the Oceanside Museum of Art from May 27 – September 17, 2017. For more information, visit oma-online.org/meyer.

For more information about the artist, visit tedmeyer.com.

Please Note: All visitors to the UC San Diego campus are required to display a valid parking pass. The closest parking to the Biomedical Library is the Gilman parking structure. More information about parking on campus.

 

 

From Crisis to Change: How to Organize for Action Workshop

 

May 10, 2017 workshop on student activism and direct organizationWith Patricia Arroyos, UCSA Statewide Organizing Director,
Cristela Garcia Spitz, Digital Initiatives Librarian,
and Tamara Rhodes, Social Sciences Librarian and Living Archive Coordinator

2 – 4 pm, Wednesday, May 10, 2017
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Register online: http://bit.ly/crisistochange

Doors open at 1:45 pm
Refreshments will be served.

According to Maya Angelou, “the more you know of your history, the more liberated you are.” Knowledge of history, along with direct action organizing, can create significant change by making students aware of their own power in order to alter the existing power relations. In this two-part training, attendees will learn about the history of UC San Diego as it relates to current campus climate, social change, and activism through the Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive project. It will be followed by concrete skills-building to learn the basic principles of direct action organizing. Students will learn the strategies, tools, and organizing math behind direct action that leads to victories for our communities.

This program will be part of a larger suite of programs compiled by the T+LC as part of their spring 2017 Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship program. Participation in any of these workshops gives credit on a student’s co-curricular record (CCR).

Speaker Information:

Patricia Arroyos, UCSA Statewide Organizing Director
As Organizing Director, Paty serves as the primary advocate and support staff for the UC Undergraduate student campaigns. Paty helps students create and implement organizing strategies for successful UCSA campaign development. Paty earned her B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2012. During her time at Berkeley, she directed a student led organization on campus that focused on mentoring at-risk students in Richmond High School, providing the academic tools and resources needed for pursuing higher education. She was also heavily involved in canvassing for local grassroots campaigns such as Environment California and the Human Rights Campaign. As a Los Angeles native and first-generation college graduate, Paty is excited to return to the education sphere and empower students to become advocates for their own education.

Cristela Garcia Spitz, UC San Diego Digital Initiatives Librarian
Cristela collaborates across areas of the library, campus, and community on projects to ensure the long-term accessibility, use, and preservation of the University’s unique collections.  Content such as photographs from the Melanesian Archive and Baja California collections, experimental recordings from the Department of Music, and all types of objects on Oceanography are available in UC San Diego’s Digital Collections website.  For the Tell Us How UC It project, she worked on the submission process, timeline, and technical infrastructure for the physical and digital exhibit.

Tamara Rhodes, UC San Diego Social Sciences Librarian and Living Archive Coordinator
Tamara started at UC San Diego in August 2015 as an Instruction Librarian and became the Subject Librarian for Psychology, Cognitive Science, Human Development, and Linguistics in January 2017. In 2013, Tamara won the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Student Paper Award for her paper on living archives, which was subsequently published. This became the basis for the Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive project. After attending the BGSA and GSA Race Relations Town Hall in April 2016, Tamara believed a living archive could be a way for the library to help support the social movements happening in the UC San Diego student community.

This event is free and intended for current UC San Diego undergraduate and graduate students. For questions or more information, please contact Tamara Rhodes, tlrhodes@ucsd.edu.

Sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and the University of California Student Association.

Midterms Are Coming Up

“What the F” – A Book Talk with Professor Benjamin Bergen

Nearly everyone swears—whether it’s over a few too many drinks, in reaction to a stubbed toe, or in flagrante delicto. And yet, we sit idly by as words are banned from television and censored in books. We insist that people excise profanity from their vocabularies and we punish children for yelling the very same dirty words that we’ll mutter in relief seconds after they fall asleep. Swearing, it seems, is an intimate part of us that we have decided to selectively deny.

Benjamin Bergen explores these behaviors in his book, What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves. As a Professor in the Department of Cognitive Science at UC San Diego, Bergen studies language and cognition in the laboratory and in the wild. Read more…

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