Holocaust Living History Workshop Hosts Three Events for Winter 2017

The Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLWH) at the University of California San Diego continues its year-long series of educational events with three insightful programs this winter, underscoring this year’s theme, “Holocaust and the Burden of History.” This year’s events approach the Holocaust from various angles to shed light on lesser-known aspects of the atrocities committed, such as the transgenerational transmission of trauma. The series, now in its ninth year of programming, is presented by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program.

HLHW events are designed to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. Members of the public and campus community are invited to attend the events to hear from local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars, as they share their personal stories and memories. All events are free and held on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5 to 7 p.m., except where otherwise noted.

January 18—Out of Oswiecim: A Family’s Odyssey—With William Rosenbaum

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The Enoch Rosenbaum family of Oswiecim

Our first winter quarter event features Del Mar resident William Rosenbaum, who will present the story of Oswiecim/Auschwitz through the prism of his family history, and share some of the challenges of being a second-generation Holocaust survivor. After the outbreak of WWII, William’s father, Jakob Enoch Rosenbaum, and his family were forced to move from Os-wiecim—a small town in Southern Poland that had been home to Jews since the mid-16th century— to the Bedzin ghetto, where they endured a life of grueling forced labor, material hardship, and daily cruelty. Through one of the ironies of history, Jakob eventually ended up in Auschwitz, a few miles from his old home. Read more…

The Magic of Concepts: A Book Talk with Author and NYU Professor Rebecca Karl

Join us for a book talk with author Rebecca E. Karl, Associate Professor of History at New York University, about her new book, The Magic of Concepts: History and the Economic in Twentieth-Century China.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

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In The Magic of Concepts, Rebecca E. Karl interrogates “the economic” as concept and practice as it was construed historically in China in the 1930s and again in the 1980s and 1990s. Separated by the Chinese Revolution and Mao’s socialist experiments, each era witnessed urgent discussions about how to think about economic concepts derived from capitalism in modern China. Both eras were highly cosmopolitan and each faced its own global crisis in economic and historical philosophy: in the 1930s, capitalism’s failures suggested that socialism offered a plausible solution, while the abandonment of socialism five decades later provoked a rethinking of the relationship between history and the economic as social practice. Interweaving a critical historiography of modern China with the work of the Marxist-trained economist Wang Yanan, Karl shows how “magical concepts” based on dehistoricized Eurocentric and capitalist conceptions of historical activity that purport to exist outside lived experiences have erased much of the critical import of China’s twentieth-century history. In this volume, Karl retrieves the economic to argue for a more nuanced and critical account of twentieth-century Chinese and global historical practice.rebecca-photo

Rebecca E. Karl is Associate Professor of History at New York University. She is the author of Mao Zedong and China in the Twentieth-Century World: A Concise History and Staging the World: Chinese Nationalism at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, and co-translator (with Xueping Zhong) of Cai Xiang’s Revolution and Its Narratives: China’s Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949-1966, all also published by Duke University Press. She co-translated and coedited (with Lydia H. Liu and Dorothy Ko) The Birth of Chinese Feminism: Essential Texts in Transnational Theory.

This event, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library, the UC San Diego History Department, the UC San Diego Literature Department, the Japanese Studies Program, the UC-Fudan Center.

For questions or more information, please contact Jinn Moon at jinmoon@ucsd.edu.

Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive

collage of images from the Tell Us How UC It Living Archive

Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive Exhibit
February – March 2017, Geisel Library, 2nd (main floor), near Seuss Room

From Crisis to Change: The Student Experience & Activism on Campus
Program & Reception: February 1, 2017 ● 3-5 pm ● Geisel Library, Seuss Room

“Inclusion doesn’t happen spontaneously when an environment becomes more diverse.  We have to be intentional in creating a welcoming environment in which all students, faculty and staff can thrive and reach their full potential.”
—Becky Petitt, Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, UC San Diego

 

UC San Diego prides itself on having a diverse student body. And no wonder, diversity, as numerous studies have shown, enriches everyone.  But as many colleges have discovered, diversity alone is not enough. Promoting diversity without attention to inclusion, mutual understanding, and supporting the needs of all students, particularly traditionally underrepresented groups, can backfire. Badly.

Over the past decade and as recently as the last month, there have been a number of incidents on the  campus that have targeted specific underrepresented groups.  These recurring events affect ALL students, underrepresented or not, and demonstrate the need for a conversation about student experiences related to the campus climate at UC San Diego. This conversation is not top down. UC San Diego has a rich history of student activism. From the university’s beginning, moments of crisis have been met by student-led transformative action.

The UC San Diego Library has begun  a “living archive,” a collection of materials presented in a way that allows for the expression, exhibition, documentation, and preservation of a sentiment or movement in a particular community.  This type of “archiving” is living because it includes content that offers real-time feedback on a particular era. The archive encompasses all manner of material from documents of the past to creative expression through art, film, writing and more.

By  highlighting the campus’s  past of evolving from crisis to accomplishing change, we can bring people together to raise questions, spark conversations, and promote multicultural understanding.

At 3pm on Wednesday, February 1, 2017, the UC San Diego Library will host “From Crisis to Change: The Student Experience & Activism on Campus.” We have gathered a panel of staff, faculty, and alumni  who have been on the front lines of change at UC San Diego. Please join us as the panelists highlight student experiences and student-led change at the UC San Diego campus.  The event will include a reception and time to view the exhibit.

This free event is open to the public. Questions and general inquiries can be directed to Tamara Rhodes, tlrhodes@ucsd.edu.

Short Tales from the Mothership

If you enjoy creative writing or hearing original short stories, you won’t want to miss this Flash-Fantasy-Sci-Fiction open mic event. Taken from the sci-fi aesthetics of UC San Diego’s iconic Geisel Library building, the UC San Diego Library is hosting a written/spoken word event for the campus and San Diego communities on:

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Thursday, January 19, 2017

7:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Writers should send fantasy or science fiction pieces of no more than 250 words to student leader Amber Gallant, at lib-adgallan@mail.ucsd.edu, prior to the live reading. Early entries are due by Tuesday, January 17. At the event you will have the opportunity to read your entry or have it read aloud for you. All are welcome to come listen to these short stories from beyond!

“Short Tales from the Mother Ship” is the first meeting of our micro-fiction project. We’ll identify further writing goals and look for future co-hosts that evening—but, mostly, we’ll be celebrating an elegant genre by listening to short tales from fellow futurists, time-travelers, inventors, artists and writers. This evening is inspired by the short postcard stories that magazine editor George Hay encouraged in the 1970’s. He dared such authors as Arthur C. Clarke to send sci-fi stories that easily fit onto a postcard.

Otherworldly libations from our refreshment laboratory will be served along with live theremin & synthesizer musical interludes.

This event, hosted by the UC San Diego Library in partnership with The Writing + Critical Expression Hub at the Teaching + Learning Commons, is free and open to the public. Questions and general inquiries can be directed to Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758.

Pedagogies of Access in Mutable Configurations of Space and Interaction

Join us for an opening reception and faculty talk.

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 Pedagogies of Access in Mutable Configurations of Space and Interaction
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
5:30 – 7:oo pm
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

 

A conversation about access and inclusion facilitated by Brian Goldfarb (UC San Diego), Suzanne Stolz (University of San Diego), and Louise Hickman (UC San Diego).

Understandings of disability and access are cast in relation to the built and social environment, and the terrains and atmospheres that convey disablement are mutable. We witness this as networked culture recasts capacities and disparities through redistributions of space and time, connection and vulnerability. Moving critical disability studies and activism forward entails attending to ways that disablement is enacted and reproduced in emergent environments that confound previous terms of sociality: intimacy and distance, inclusion and marginalization, security and vulnerability, autonomy and interdependence, public and private, lay and expert, etc. As such, pedagogies attentive to the complex, often divergent, effects produced in the weave of online and offline social life are needed for rethinking how (dis)ability is learned and ways we can unlearn ableism.

We will also celebrate the Access exhibit which includes projects by seven groups of students that participated in an undergraduate seminar in the Communication Department. Our aim was to further the discussion of access among the UCSD community by exploring physical, cultural, economic and other limits to participation. Together these projects ask: How accessible is UCSD? How accessible is Geisel?

The exhibit is located in Geisel Library, 2nd (main) floor, East and West wings.

Brian Goldfarb is professor in the UC San Diego Department of Communication.  His research and media production focuses on contemporary visual and digital culture, disability studies and education. His book, Visual Pedagogy: Media Cultures in and beyond the Classroom, considers how media technologies were used in the second half of the 20th century to advance models of pedagogy across the arts, education, and postcolonial politics in the United States and globally. His current projects include Global Tourette, a digital documentary and media exchange project that engages cultural and professional responses to Tourette Syndrome in the US, Argentina and other contexts internationally.  He was also curator of education at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in NYC from 1994 – 1997 where he organized exhibitions and directed the education program. His media and art projects have been exhibited nationally and internationally.

Suzanne Stolz, Ed.D. serves at the University of San Diego as Academic Coordinator of the Online M.Ed. and as faculty for the program’s Universal Design for Learning and Inclusive Education specialization. A former high school English teacher and school administrator, she is passionate about working with teachers to better understand the nuances of disability experience and create inclusive school communities. She is currently working on a manuscript titled, Disability Trajectories, that draws on her experiences as a disabled woman leading mentoring programs for disabled young people and conducting trainings for school districts on What Graduates with IEPs Wish Their Educators Addressed.

Louise Hickman is a Ph.D. candidate in Communication at the University of California, San Diego. She completed her Bachelors degree with honors in American Studies at King’s College London, and the University of California, Berkeley. During her year at Berkeley, she served as Vice-President of the Disabled Student’s Union. Louise has served as an access consultant for Catalyst: Feminism, Theory and Technoscience, a peer-reviewed, open-source journal, advocating for a platform where access will remain an on-going, reflexive and collaborative project in digital and disability design. Her dissertation, titled Creating Accessible Infrastructure: Disability, Technology and Transcription, considers how persons with sensory disabilities access transcription, made possible through assistive technologies. Following this premise, her work has also included the installation of The Totem Project, which was shown as part of the exhibition “Senses of Care” in Calit2 (California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology’s Gallery Space) in Spring 2014.

Hosted by the UC San Diego Library and Department of Communication

Visit Geisel’s Stress-Free-Zone During Finals: December 5 – 7, 2016

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2016 Turkey Calling Show

Join the Library for its annual Turkey Calling Show in honor of America’s cherished Thanksgiving holiday. Investigate the American turkey’s surprising presence in European art and learn more about the bird through turkey calling techniques. This noisy show at Geisel Library has become a community tradition. Kids are welcome and will be encouraged to actively participate in the fun. Presented as an old-time radio hour, this celebration is filled with music, sound-effects and stories of interest.

turkeyWednesday, November 23, 2016

12:00 – 1:oo pm

Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Host and bandleader Scott Paulson, a UC San Diego alumnus and Exhibits & Events Coordinator at the UC San Diego Library, has been lauded by the Union-Tribune for his family-friendly shows. The Los Angeles times described his activities as follows: “Paulson’s brand of G-rated fun, a sort of modern day morphing of Captain Kangaroo and Spike Jones, is always lively and at times wonderfully chaotic.”

This event is free and open to the public. No RSVP required. For more info, contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758.

3D CAVEkiosk Now Open in Geisel Library

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Travel to at-risk cultural heritage sites around the world and explore them in virtual reality at Geisel Library’s new 3D CAVEkiosk. The life-size kiosk, located in the East Commons on the main floor, is now open to the campus community and the public at large during Library open hours through November 2017. 3D glasses and a controller are available near the TV screens. Personnel at the nearby East Commons Desk and Digital Media Lab are available to assist with your interaction of the kiosk technology if needed. Click here to learn more about the one-of-a-kind, large-scale 3D immersive environment.

New 3-D CAVEkiosk at UC San Diego Brings Cyber-Archaeology to Geisel

The University of California San Diego’s iconic, futuristic spaceship of a building, Geisel Library, will unveil its first virtual-reality 3-D display system during a public reception on Monday, November 7 from 10 am to noon. The life-size CAVEkiosk will be open to the campus community and the public at large, but it will also allow researchers to analyze and visualize 3-D data from at-risk archaeological sites in Egypt, Turkey, Jordan, Israel, Greece, Morocco and Cyprus. Ongoing hours of operation can be found here.

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An ancient cultural heritage site in the Egyptian city of Luxor as seen on the CAVEkiosk virtual-reality system.

The Geisel Library kiosk is one of four kiosks planned for University of California campuses at San Diego, Berkeley, Los Angeles, and Merced. All are partners in a UC collaboration led by UC San Diego archaeologist Thomas E. Levy, a professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Qualcomm Institute’s Center for Cyber-Archaeology and Sustainability (CCAS).

The At-Risk Cultural Heritage and Digital Humanities project, funded by a UC President’s Research Catalyst Award, leverages a 10-100 Gigabits-per-second network—the National Science Foundation-funded Pacific Research Platform (PRP)—to harness and preserve “big data” to ensure that endangered cultural heritage resources are preserved and safeguarded.

“We have just completed the first year of our Catalyst grant,” said Levy. “The installation of the 3-D CAVEkiosk in UC San Diego’s Geisel Library marks the completion of a major research goal of the project, so our team is very excited about that. In addition to catalyzing cyber-archaeology work and providing virtual reality-equipped network bandwidth with which UC scholars can collaborate, share, store and visualize at-risk cultural heritage data, members of the campus communities and visitors to the kiosks can “travel” to cultural heritage sites and explore them as if they were there.” Read more…

Library Joins One Book, One San Diego for Anniversary Celebration

Local author Zohreh Ghahremani to speak on Nov 3. for One Book event at Geisel Library

sky-of-red-poppiesThe UC San Diego Library has joined KPBS, the San Diego Public Library, San Diego County Library, and other local partners in celebrating the 10th anniversary of the popular One Book, One San Diego community reading program, an initiative launched in San Diego to encourage a shared reading experience focused on reading and discussing “One Book.” To commemorate the 10th anniversary, One Book sponsors are welcoming back many of the outstanding authors whose books were One Book selections over the last decade.

On Thursday, November 3, the UC San Diego Library will host a One Book event featuring author Zohreh Ghahremani, who will discuss the themes and issues presented in her acclaimed debut novel, Sky of Red Poppies, which was the One Book selection in 2012. Babak Rahimi, a professor of Communication, Culture and Religion at UC San Diego, will guide and facilitate the discussion with Ghahremani. The discussion will be followed by a reception, which will include traditional Persian food, music by the UC San Diego undergraduate ensemble, Sibarg, and a book signing with the author. Copies of the book will be available for purchase. The Geisel Library event will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. To make reservations for the event, please visit www.RedPoppies.eventbrite.com. Walk-ins will be accommodated on a first come, first serve basis if seats are available.

Sky of Red Poppies traces a unique friendship between two very different young women who form a bond in Iran during the turbulent and dangerous 1960s, when Iran was still ruled by the Shah. As the tale unfolds, the history and culture of Iran continues to shape their very different life experiences. Ghahremani, born and raised in Iran, moved to San Diego in 2000 after she decided to leave her career as a dentist in Chicago to become a writer. Her writing has won several awards, including 1st place in California Stories (2005) and San Diego Book Awards (2004), and Best Fiction at Santa Barbara Writers Conference (2004). Her latest novel, The Moon Daughter, was published in 2013.

For more information on One Book, One San Diego events in the region, visit: www.kpbs.com/onebook.

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