Video Editing in the DML

Video

The Digital Media Lab is decked out with video editing and capture software. Our offerings include:

  • Finalcut Pro X
  • Camtasia
  • Snagit
  • Adobe Premiere CC
  • After Effects CC
  • iMovie

Check out library.ucsd.edu/dml to browse our software catalog, make a reservation, or get help with a project.

Meet Up In The Library…

TA Cubicle

Teaching Assistants and Teaching Apprentices may schedule office hours or drop in review sessions in the Library in our specially designed spaces. Quarterly reservations are available for the consultation cubicle in the East Commons as well room 201 in the Biomedical Library Building. Students, if you would like your TA to meet you in the Library, let them know about this service.

Visit our webpage for details or Learning Spaces Program’s Outreach Specialist Dorthea Stewart, at dsstewart@ucsd.edu or 858.534.8378 for reservations.

Space Offerings

The Geisel TA/Instructor Consultations Area currently offers a round table & 3 chairs in a semi-private area. Mobile whiteboards are available in the surrounding area that can be used, as needed. While no computer is available, wireless and powered outlets are available.

The BLB Consultations Area is in Room 201, beyond the book stacks on the 2nd floor.  It offers a large table with chairs and a wall-mounted whiteboard in a small room.  While no computer is available, wireless and powered outlets are available.

We welcome any suggestions about additional equipment that might be useful in the spaces.

Geisel Library is Backdrop for Food Network’s Cake Wars Filming

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Photo Credit: Erik Jepsen, UC San Diego Publications

 

“One Cake, Two Cake, Red Cake, Blue Cake!” On Monday, January 18th the Food Network’s popular Cake Wars show aired a special Dr. Seuss-themed episode to celebrate Seuss’s newest book, What Pet Should I Get? Everyone from the Cat in the Hat to Thing 1 and Thing 2 joined the sugar-packed competition as host Jonathan Bennett worked hard to inspire the four competing cake artists, who were tasked with recreating the world of Dr. Seuss in cake form.

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Photo Credit: Erik Jepsen, UC San Diego Publications

In the first round, the bakers rushed against the clock to design a cake that featured their own version of a Seussian character as well as two surprise ingredients: green eggs and ham. After the elimination of one contestant, the three remaining cake artists went head-to-head in a challenge for the grand prize: $10,000 and a chance to have their winning creation on center stage at a celebration with UC San Diego students at Geisel Library. Guest judge Susan Brandt, President of Dr. Seuss Enterprises, was on-hand to ensure the winning cake would live up to the seussical standards of the late children’s book author.

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Photo Credit: Erik Jepsen, UC San Diego Publications

Self-taught baker Melissa Zunich from Colorado and her cousin Sunny Hintze were the winning bakers, creating a towering buttermilk vanilla bean cake that “screams Dr. Seuss,” according to judge Waylynn Lucas. Their artful creation was studded with familiar characters, including the Lorax, Thing 1 and Thing 2, and a host of other Seussian props, such as a plate of green eggs and ham, and the famous fish bowl and hat from Cat in the Hat. The cake was topped off with the two children from What Pet Should I Get? The winners visited the UC San Diego campus in early December to celebrate in Seussian style, with 50 students who were filmed for the show while eating cake. Click here to view some behind-the-scenes photos that UC San Diego photographer Eric Jepsen took of the filming adjacent to the Dr. Seuss statue near the forum level of Geisel. If you missed out on the Cake Wars show, you can still taste the cake! Visit the Food Nework website for Zunich and Hintze’s winning recipe.

Chair Massages for students

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The Zone’s Relaxation & Rescue Squad will again provide chair massages in Geisel Library each Monday evening in Winter term, except on February 1.  The massages will be offered in the Academic Partnership Cubicle in the East Commons, in addition to alternating between the West Commons, the Media Desk area, and the Brody Space, as noted below.

  • January 11:  West Commons (2nd Floor) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • January 25:  Brody Space  (1st Floor Southwest) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • February 8:  Media Desk area  (1st Floor West) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • February 22:  West Commons (2nd Floor) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • February 29:  Brody Space  (1st Floor Southwest) & East Commons (2nd Floor)
  • March 7:  Media Desk area (1st Floor West) & East Commons (2nd Floor)

 

Virtual Victoriana: Roots of 3-D

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A Holmes stereoscope from the 19th century.

Attendee of the 2015 Google I/O conference inspects Google Cardboard. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stereoscopic devices of the 1800’s were used for entertainment and educational purposes. Flat postcard images of exotic locales and architectural wonders were transformed into three-dimensional visits via elegant hand-held stereoscopes. These simple devices are not unlike the cardboard Google glasses that were recently distributed by the New York Times. Important 20th century tools such as 3-D arial maps are directly related to these Victorian diversions.

See these old and new tools at a small exhibit at the UC San Diego Library (Geisel West, 2nd floor) through March 2016.

The exhibit includes stereoscopic books of interest from the Library’s circulating collection, tracing current virtual surgery and modern 3-D motion pictures back to these earliest novelties. Devices on display are simple but effective: original and re-issued stereoscopes, Google glasses, old-school 3-D glasses, early Bakelite “view-masters” and, of course, many Victorian Era stereoscopic postcards.

For more information, contact Scott Paulson at 858-822-5758 or spaulson@ucsd.edu.

Geisel Library Exhibit Sheds Light on Chinese Workers Who Built Transcontinental Railway

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Chinese work group for the Great Northern Railway, c. 1909. (Photo courtesy of Royal British Columbia Museum)

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental, produced by the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford University, is on display through February 29, 2016 in Geisel Library on the University of California, San Diego campus. The exhibit tells the undocumented story of thousands of Chinese migrants, who played an instrumental role in the construction of the nation’s first transcontinental railway in the 1860s.

In addition to the partnership with the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford, the Chinese American Library Association’s Task Force on Chinese Railroad Workers, which seeks to increase awareness and appreciation for the contributions of Chinese Americans, helped to bring the exhibit to the campus.

A reception will be held on Friday, January 22, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library, to celebrate the opening of the exhibit at the UC San Diego Library, the first institution to host the exhibit after its debut last summer at Stanford University and the Chinese Historical Society of America. The reception will include remarks from: Hilton Obenzinger, associate director of the Chinese Railroad Workers Project and a Lecturer in American Studies & English at Stanford University; Simeon Man, a scholar of Asian American Studies and an assistant professor in UC San Diego’s Department of History; and Murray Lee, Curator of Chinese American History for the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum. The event is free and open to the public. To make a reservation, please visit: http://lib.ucsd.edu/ironroadRead more…

Campus “Portraits” Now Deck the Walls of Geisel Library

IMG_1625The previously unadorned walls leading to the East Learning Commons in Geisel Library are now colorful and vibrant thanks to local artist, Paula McColl. McColl, who resides in La Jolla, recently painted some of the UC San Diego campus’ most distinctive buildings and settings, including Geisel Library, the Revelle College Fountain, and the Scripps bridge. While her campus paintings debuted at the Faculty Club this past summer, a selection of her oil paintings will continue to grace the walls of Geisel through winter quarter.

A native of Zanesville, Ohio, McColl graduated with a BA in Art History/Studio Art from Hunter College in New York City. After college, she exhibited her work at the Edward Throp Gallery in New York before moving to Brazil, where Sao Paulo’s Museum of Modern Art held an exhibition of her paintings,  Duas Cidades, Sao Paulo e Nova York. The one-woman show included paintings of the cityscapes of these two major cities.  Read more…

Holocaust Living History Workshop Series Continues with “Holocaust Journeys”

Charlotte_Salomon

Work by German-Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon who died at Auschwitz in 1943.

The 2015-16 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) series continues this January with six compelling authors, films, and other events highlighting the diverse “Holocaust Journeys” of survivors and others recounting their personal stories. Co-sponsored by the University of California, San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program, the HLHW lecture series invites local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars to share their personal stories and memories with students and interested members of the public. The goal of the program is to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

All events are free and open to the public, and are held on Wednesdays on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5 to 7 p.m., with some exceptions (as noted below).

January 13Think Only of Today: A Documentary Film about the Life of Holocaust Survivor, Max Garcia (With Alberto Lau and Robert Schneider)

Think Only of Today traces the life of Max Garcia from his childhood in Amsterdam, through the Holocaust, and finally to his immigration and life in the United States. Born in 1924, Max was interned in Westerbork before being deported to Auschwitz and later Mauthausen. The documentary, which follows Max’s ordeal through war and incarceration, also explores the effect of the Holocaust on succeeding generations. Interviews with Max’s children and grandchildren reveal the different ways individuals from each generation have grappled with the burden of such a searing experience.

February 10Exile in Ecuador (With Moselio Schaechter)

Moselio Schaechter spent his childhood in Mussolini’s Italy. Thanks to a transit visa for Portugal and the United States, the Schaechters made it to Quito, Ecuador in January 1941. Over the next nine years, Moselio struggled to accommodate his Jewish identity with a nascent South American self. In this talk he shares memories of his youth, his experience in the Ecuadorian Jewish refugee community, his life in the U.S., and his subsequent visit to his old “home.” Schaechter is a distinguished professor emeritus at Tufts University and an adjunct professor in microbiology at SDSU and UC San Diego. Read more…

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental

ChineseRailroadExhibit-e-vite

Join us for a reception to celebrate the opening of the exhibit,

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental.

Friday, January 22, 2016

3:00 – 5:00 pm

Seuss Room, Geisel Library

Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.

Click here to RSVP

The Chinese and the Iron Road exhibit on display at Geisel Library in the Seuss Room foyer from January 4 thru February 29, 2016 pays tribute to the Chinese workers who helped build the nation’s first Transcontinental Railroad 150 years ago.

The exhibit, produced by the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA) and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford University (CRRW), comprises stand-alone graphic panels featuring historical and contemporary photos, along with illustrations and text chronicling the building the Transcontinental Railroad.

The CRRW project seeks to re-discover the history of Chinese railroad workers constructing America’s first Transcontinental Railroad during the period of 1865 -1869 and “give a voice to the Chinese migrants whose labor on the Transcontinental Railroad helped to shape the physical and social landscape of the American West. The Project coordinates research in North America and Asia in order to create an online digital archive available to all, along with books, digital visualizations, conferences and public events.” (CRRW)

Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) plays a leading role in coordinating this traveling exhibit.

For more information, contact Serafin Raya at seraya@ucsd.edu.

 

150lb Steel Bridge on Display in Geisel Library through December

IMG_0009  IMG_0010

Every year, students from the UC San Diego Society of Civil and Structural Engineers (SCSE) design, fabricate, and construct a scaled model steel bridge for the purpose of competing in the American Society of Civil Engineers annual Pacific Southwest Conference. Last year’s challenge was no different. A small group of students came together in the fall of 2014 to apply the knowledge learned in class to design a bridge that would be competitive in the following categories: aesthetics, weight, timed construction, as well as other criteria.

Supervised by four faculty advisors, three of whom are structural engineering professors and staff from the Campus Research Machine Shop (CRMS), the team of students gathered in a classroom setting last fall to model and analyze the steel bridge through an iterative process until an optimal design was achieved. To have the optimal design, a bridge has to be sufficiently light, while being stiff enough to pass the vertical and lateral load tests. The bridge must also be fast and easy to construct. Read more…

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