DML Project: Fallen Star Model

Using Autodesk Inventor and an Ultimaker 2, our staff has modeled and printed a version of UCSD’s famous Fallen Star

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Sept. 18 Dinner in the Library Focuses on ‘Building for the Future’

DinnerInTheLibrary_original

The University of California, San Diego’s 12th annual Dinner in the Library will take place Friday, Sept. 18 in the university’s iconic Geisel Library building. The event, which is open to the public, will celebrate the theme “Building for the Future,” with proceeds supporting the UC San Diego Library’s collections, services and learning spaces. Festivities will include dinner and cocktails, a silent auction and a keynote talk from Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library.

“The UC San Diego Library plays a vital role in supporting the university’s world-renowned research and instruction,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “Private support from Dinner in the Library helps ensure that the Library remains at the leading-edge of the nation’s academic libraries. We are pleased to have Sarah Thomas of Harvard Library join us to share her insights on the enduring value and impact of libraries.”

Dinner in the Library attendees will hear from Thomas on a topic that is of critical interest to readers and lovers of knowledge and libraries. Her talk, “Back to the Future with the Brave New Library,” will focus on how libraries are changing to meet evolving scholarly and public needs in new and often unexpected ways. Before joining Harvard in 2013 to head the university’s vast library system, Thomas served as Bodley’s Librarian, overseeing the libraries of the University of Oxford, including the renowned Bodleian Library, which dates back to the 12th century. She was the first woman and non-British citizen to hold Oxford’s head librarian position, and published “The Bod Squad” in Transforming the Bodleian (2012), detailing her experiences. Previously, Thomas served as the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University.

“We are thrilled to host Sarah Thomas for a talk addressing the future of libraries in the digital age,” said Brian E.C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “Like many libraries across the nation—and around the globe—we see library facilities and resources being used just as much as in the past, but in different ways.  It is critical that academic libraries such as the UC San Diego Library continue evolving to meet the ever-changing needs of our students, scholars and researchers. I can think of few speakers, if any, better suited than Sarah Thomas to expound upon this evolution—and to do so with wit and grace.”

Read more…

Hundreds of Seuss Fans Visit Geisel to Celebrate New Dr. Seuss Book

WPSP_DrSeuss-3

Hundreds of Dr. Seuss fans paid a visit to Geisel Library on July 28 to celebrate the release of  the new Dr. Seuss book, What Pet Should I Get?. At the event, the UC San Diego Bookstore sold a limited number of copies of the new book, which was released publicly by Random House on July 28.

Along with the book sale, the Library’s annual exhibition of original drawings and sketches by Theodor Seuss Geisel, “Boids & Beasties,” was on view. The exhibition included original materials from What Pet Should I Get?.

What Pet Should I Get? is based on materials that were donated in 2013 by Audrey Geisel to the UC San Diego Library’s Dr. Seuss Collection, the primary repository for Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative works. The Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses more than 15,000 items in its Dr. Seuss Collection, including original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs and memorabilia, documenting the full range of Theodor Seuss Geisel’s creative achievements, from his high school activities in 1919 up until his death in 1991.

Photos from the event can be viewed here.

Audrey Geisel Donates $3 Million to Renovate Geisel Library

Geisel Night DrSeuss UCSDCommPub

San Diego philanthropist, literacy advocate, and longtime supporter of the University of California, San Diego, Audrey Geisel, has donated $3 million toward the renovation of the university’s iconic flagship building, Geisel Library. The gift kicks off a major initiative to transform and revitalize the interior public spaces of Geisel Library to meet the evolving needs of students, faculty, and other Library users in the digital age. Geisel’s gift will be used to renovate and update the entry level of Geisel Library, which opened in 1972 as the university’s Central Library. In 1995, the William Pereira-designed building—known by many as “the spaceship”—was named in honor of Audrey and her late husband, Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, in recognition of a major gift from Audrey Geisel.

“We are extremely grateful to Audrey for this generous lead gift to launch the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.  “This will ensure that Geisel Library, a campus and architectural landmark, continues to provide the outstanding services and spaces needed to support today’s students and scholars, as well as members of the local community. Audrey has been one of the university’s most generous and stalwart supporters, and with this gift, the Geisel legacy will continue to shape our future success as a world-class university.”

The UC San Diego Library is ranked amongst the top 25 academic research libraries in the nation, with more than seven million digital and print volumes, journals, and multimedia materials. Library resources provide the foundation of knowledge for many of the groundbreaking discoveries, treatments, and intellectual achievements for which UC San Diego has become renowned. While many of the Library’s information resources are available online 24/7, more than 1.5 million people stream through the Geisel Library and the Biomedical Library buildings each year, and the Library’s vast resources and services are accessed more than 5.7 million times via the Library website.

Audrey Geisel“When I first saw the space-age building that is now Geisel Library, I was enamored with its iconic design, as well as its scholarly and literacy mission,” said Geisel. “Decades later, I am delighted with the impact the Library has had on countless students, researchers, and scholars, as well as on San Diego. It gives me great joy to help ensure that Geisel Library will continue to attract and fuel students, scholars, and community members who are passionate about learning.”

While the UC San Diego Library has long been recognized as a leader in digitizing its collections and in harnessing technology to advance scholarship, the 285,000 square-foot facility—which is more than four decades old—has become dated.  As the Library’s collections continue to shift from print to digital, spaces no longer needed to house books and journals are increasingly needed for collaborative learning and research.

“There is no way to convey how much Audrey’s gift means to the UC San Diego Library,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian.  “I am thrilled with the positively transformative effect this will have on the Geisel Library public spaces, and how much this will benefit the campus and local communities. Audrey’s incredible support through the existing Geisel Library Endowments has ensured a level of excellence in our collections and staff, and helped maintain our ranking as a top 25 research library during a time of significant budget cuts. This current use gift will launch an exciting new chapter in our evolution, ensuring that Geisel Library continues to function as a vital and innovative facility that enables our talented students, faculty, and staff to excel.”

The main (2nd) floor of Geisel Library is the most active learning space in the Library. Based on ongoing assessments of user needs and traffic patterns, this floor will be redesigned to more effectively support the various approaches to study, research, and learning of today’s students and scholars. The major renovation will include a reconfigured lobby entrance; a significant upgrade to the existing Learning Commons; a new Research Commons; a café and lounge; the implementation of new technologies; and significant enhancements to furniture, carpeting and finishes.

“Our library facilities are being used now, more than ever,” said Schottlaender. “But, like many libraries across the nation, the Library is being used in different ways than it has in the past.  Our hope is that this generous gift will lead to more support, so we can upgrade other public spaces in the building in the near future. I would urge others to join Audrey in helping fulfill this exciting initiative to transform Geisel Library into a library that is well-equipped for 21st century learners. We want this amazing building to be as inspiring on the inside as it is bold on the outside.”

Geisel Library is also home to the Dr. Seuss Collection—in Mandeville Special Collections—with more than 12,000 original drawings, sketches, manuscript drafts, books, notebooks, photographs, and other memorabilia documenting the creative achievements of Theodor Seuss Geisel. In 1992, additional space was added to the Geisel Library building with the construction of subterranean wings by Gunnar Birkerts & Associates, preserving the silhouette of the building’s striking geometric design.

Renovation of the entry level of Geisel Library is the first stage of the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative, with additional major enhancements slated for the 1st and 8th floors. Private support is essential to accomplishing this ambitious undertaking. For further information on the initiative, please click here or contact Julie Sully, Director of Development for the Library, at jsully@ucsd.edu or 858-822-4554.

Schottlaender Receives ALA & Alumni Awards

20150627_190931University Librarian Brian Schottlaender was recognized for his stellar contributions to the library and information science professions at this year’s recent American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in San Francisco.

Schottlaender was the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award from Indiana University’s Department of Information and Library Science (ILS), where he received his M.L.I.S. degree. The ILS Distinguished Alumni Award honors the exceptional skills exhibited by the alumnus, the noteworthy contributions they have made to society, and the significant influence they have made on their place of employment, community and profession.

Earlier this year, Schottlaender was named as the winner of the ALA’s  Hugh C. Atkinson Memorial Award, for his exceptional leadership and many achievements in the library world and at UC San Diego, and the University of California. Schottlaender was presented with the Atkinson award at the  ALA conference.

At the time of the announcement, Nancy J. Gibbs, Hugh C. Atkinson Memorial Award committee chair for ALA and former head of the Acquisitions Department at Duke University, lauded Schottlaender for his vision, collaboration, and willingness to take risks to achieve transformational goals:

“Brian is a visionary giant… He has eloquently articulated a vision for the 21st century academic library while finding balance with the need for physical resources, services, staff, and space. He understands we must work collaboratively in order to address the most challenging concerns facing libraries today…. Brian has demonstrated taking calculated risks that have proven transformational for libraries. This is evident in just a few of the initiatives he has shepherded: the Western Regional Storage Trust (WEST); HathiTrust, Pacific Rim Digital Library Alliance, and Chronopolis, an effort in extensible digital preservation.”

Read the full ALA release here.

Categories: Library News, Staff News

Carillon Chimes atop Geisel Library Make Telematic Debut at La Jolla Symphony Concerts

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On Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, the La Jolla Symphony & Chorus will premiere The Moon in La Jolla, the 2015 winner of the prestigious Nee Commission Award. In addition to the classic orchestral ensemble, the UC San Diego Library’s carillon, which sits atop Geisel Library, will make its debut in the La Jolla Symphony performances via telematic technology.

This “tele-concerto” incorporates technology that allows musicians to play music together from different sites via the Internet. Thus, for the first time in the carillon’s 26-year history, the orchestra in Mandeville Auditorium will play in real-time with a carillon soloist from atop Geisel Library at the May 2 and 3 concerts.

Truly a 21st century work, the innovative musical piece was composed by UC San Diego Ph.D. candidate and Hong Kong composer, Yeung-ping Chen, and is based on a poem written by Hong Kong poet and UC San Diego alumnus, Leung Ping-Kwan, also known by the pen name Yasi. Ping-Kwan crafted the poem, The Moon in La Jolla, when he was studying at UC San Diego in the late 1970s.

Yeung-ping Chen, an award-winning composer, has been the recipient of numerous prizes and grants, including the prestigious Altius Fellowship from the Asian Cultural Council. Chen, who is currently studying with UC San Diego Music Professor Lei Liang, is conducting research on telematics musical composition, performative strategies for electro-acoustic music, and a hyper-transcriptional compositional process which he calls “Sonic Engraving.”

The carillon in Geisel Library, is operated by musician Scott Paulson, a UC San Diego alumnus and Library employee. Paulson, who performs noon concerts and musical requests on the carillon, has been collaborating for many months with Chen, Library staff, and La Jolla Symphony musicians to bring the “tele-concerto” to fruition.

For more information about the concerts, or to purchase tickets, visit lajollasymphony.com.

Cataloging Librarian Rebecca Culbertson Wins ALCTS Award

Untitled-6Rebecca Culbertson, an Electronic Resources Cataloging Librarian at UC San Diego, has received the 2015 Ulrich’s Serials Librarianship Award from the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Culbertson is being honored for her achievements in serials librarianship, including mentoring a generation of catalogers and serving as “a champion for cataloging education.”

“Becky has truly made enormous contributions to cataloging,” said University Librarian Brian Schottlaender. “Her concept of using one bibliographic record for multiple providers of online serial titles—known as the Provider-Neutral concept—has become the accepted practice for online monographs as well. As a former cataloger myself, I have a great deal of respect for her work and am grateful for her many efforts.”

Culbertson began working for the UC San Diego Library (then the Undergraduate Library) in 1967, under Melvin Voigt, the University’s first University Librarian. She remembers seeing the Geisel Library under construction and the big move to the building after its completion in 1970. Technology, she recalls, was not what it is today: “There was not even a functioning Xerox machine.” Originally from Lansing, Michigan, Culbertson graduated from Kalamazoo College and the University of Michigan School of Library Science. She worked as a cataloger at the University of Michigan for three years, and then did a six-month stint at the University of Georgia, while her husband was in Naval Supply Corps School.

Culbertson will be honored and formally presented with her award—which includes $750 from ProQuest—on June 27 at the ALCTS awards ceremony at the ALA’s 2015 Annual Conference in San Francisco. Maria Collins of North Carolina State University’s Hunt Library is receiving the award along with Culbertson. As a longtime mentor to many budding catalogers over the years, Culbertson’s advice is simple: Learn to make effective use of the catalog. After 50 years, she is still enthusiastic about librarianship and finds the future of library and information work—“the steady drumbeat of the move towards Open Access both through local digitization efforts and repositories”—exciting.

Among her many contributions to the field, she has been an active contributor to CONSER and Program of Cooperative Cataloging (PCC) task groups, and has worked tirelessly to develop and promote clear standards for the cataloging and communication of serials information, as well as the effective presentation of journals though accepted standards.

La Jolla Symphony Premiere to Include Telematic Approach Featuring Geisel Library Chimes

On Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, UC San Diego’s La Jolla Symphony & Chorus will premiere The Moon in La Jolla, the 2015 winner of the prestigious Nee Commission Award. Composed by UC San Diego Ph.D. candidate and Hong Kong composer Yeung-ping Chen, this orchestral piece features telematic technology which allows musicians to play music together from different sites via the internet. At the May concerts, the audience in UC San Diego’s Mandeville Auditorium will experience the Geisel Library chimes (rooftop clock/carillon) as they interact with La Jolla Symphony through this telematic approach.Composer Yeung-ping Chen

Yeung-ping Chen’s innovative musical piece is based on a poem, The Moon in La Jolla, written by Hong Kong poet and UC San Diego alumnus Leung Ping-Kwan, also known by the pen name Yasi. Leung Ping-Kwan crafted the poem when he was studying at UC San Diego in the late 1970s.

Since this orchestral work is tailor-made for the Geisel Library chimes and because April is National Poetry Month, the Library is hosting a special exhibition and reading to celebrate this intersection of poetry and music. All are welcome to gather outside on the Forum Level of the Library at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, April 21, where special guest Suyin Mak, Hong Kong music theorist and poet (CUHK Professor and currently a scholar-in-residence at UCLA), read the Yasi poem. UC San Diego carillonneur, Scott Paulson, will perform chiming musical passages of Yeung-ping Chen’s composition in response to the imaginative poem.

Immediately after the reading, the audience is invited into a Library exhibition area (Geisel West, 1st floor) for refreshments. The composer, carillonneur, and Visual Arts student Kim Garcia– collabora  tors of The Moon in La Jolla exhibit — will be on hand to discuss and explain the displayed items, some of which have been donated by Yasi’s widow for this event. They will also share the experience of collaboration, emphasizing Yasi’s works and his memories of life at UC San Diego, showing a parallel view of composer Yeung-ping Chen, and examining the special fellowship between poet Yasi, composer “Ping” and their various mentors.

Attorney Who Recovered Klimt’s Famous “Golden Lady” Painting to Speak May 6

MARIA&R2 Attorney E. Randol Schoenberg was able to accomplish what few thought was possible—He recovered Gustav Klimt’s famous “Golden Lady” painting, which was stolen by the Nazis in 1938. Schoenberg’s experiences are the subject of a newly released movie, Woman in Gold, which he will discuss at the May 6 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) event. His talk, “Whatever Happened to Klimt’s Golden Lady,” is sponsored by Phyllis and Daniel Epstein. HLWH is a collaboration between the UC San Diego Library and the Jewish Studies program.

Schoenberg, a top litigator and the grandson of composer Arnold Schoenberg, succeeded in getting back the “Golden Lady” painting and other works of art after a seven-year struggle against the Austrian government. Woman in Gold—starring Helen Mirren, Ryan Reynolds, and Katie Holmes— is the true story of Schoenberg’s decision to take on a seemingly hopeless case for a close family friend, Maria Altmann, who was trying to recover six Klimt paintings stolen from her family home in Austria in 1938. The famous painting, officially called “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I,” depicts Altmann’s aunt, swathed in a glittering mosaic of gold.

Mariapainting

Woman in Gold is based on Schoenberg and Altmann’s experiences, which are also the subject of the Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt’s Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Blauer, the 2012 book by Anne-Marie O’Connor.

The May 6 talk will take place at 5 p.m. at the Copley International Conference Center on the UC San Diego campus. The event will begin at 4:30 p.m., with light refreshments. The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are recommended. To reserve seats, and for more information: https://hlhw-klimt.eventbrite.com. For more information about the Holocaust Living History Workshop, contact Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661 or visit: http://library.ucsd.edu/hlhw.

 

Behind-the-Scenes Tour of Inland Empire Libraries on April 24

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A.K. Smiley Library Public Library

If you like books, libraries, architecture, and science fiction, you might want to sign up for an all-day tour Friday, April 24, with UC San Diego’s University Librarian, Brian Schottlaender, to visit some of the Inland Empire’s most spectacular libraries.

The tour will start at the A.K. Smiley Public Library in Redlands, an architectural gem and a designated historic landmark which opened in 1898. Participants will get a custom tour by Library director Don McCue and will learn about the Smiley’s rare and valuable materials from Special Collections director, Nathan Gonzales. This stop will include a visit to the Lincoln Memorial Shrine just next door.

Rivera

Rivera Library UC Riverside

From Redlands, the group will head to Riverside for an informal lunch at the amazing Mission Inn with Steve Mandeville-Gamble, UC Riverside’s university librarian. After lunch, participants will have time to explore the stunning and unusual Mission Inn before departing for the UC Riverside campus, and a tour of UC Riverside’s Special Collections & Archives. At UCR, library staff will share highlights of the collection, including the Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy, the largest publicly-accessible collection of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and utopian literature in the world.
The all-day excursion will begin with an 8:30 a.m. departure by coach from the Supercomputer Center on the UC San Diego campus, and will return at approximately 6 p.m. The fee to attend is $80 per person, which includes transportation, lunch, snacks, and gratuity. Seating is limited to 25 people!

To register, please contact Christina Continelli no later than Friday, April 17, 2015
at 858-534-1183, or ccontinelli@ucsd.edu.

 

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