Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21

faculty_victorOn February 24, the University of California, San Diego Library will sponsor Correcting the Course on Climate Change Negotiations: the Road from Paris COP21, featuring climate change policy expert David Victor and students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who attended COP21, and will provide their insights on the process and the outcome. The event is free and open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library.

David Victor, a professor of international relations at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy & Strategy, has been a participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) proceedings since the IPCC’s inception, and was a party to the negotiations in Paris. School of Global Policy and Strategy students Joaquin Vallejo and Shayla Ragimov, who accompanied Victor at the Paris talks, were part of the large UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography delegation, and helped to advocate for an increased recognition of the role of oceans in the new climate. Victor, who has been an astute observer of and an active contributor to climate change negotiations since the late 1980s, believes there are very specific reasons why COP21, while not without its flaws, was more productive than any climate negotiations in the last 20 years.

Victor, co-director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, is the author of Global Warming Gridlock, his 2011 book which argued that a “radical rethinking” of global warming policy was needed in order to make international law more effective in bringing about international compacts to reduce global emissions. The Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21), held in December 2015, employed the “bottom-up approach” Victor advocated in his book, producing an international agreement that sets both short and long term targets for reducing emissions worldwide. Last year, Victor also wrote a paper for the journal, Nature, which pushed for a more streamlined and less constricted focus that would better integrate the social sciences in the climate change policy process, to more effectively address related social, political, and psychological issues. Read more…

What’s Climate Change To You?

What's Climate Changepic

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Events Room, Biomedical Library Building

Light refreshments will be served.

Join us as Dr. Bruce Bekkar, a UC San Diego alumnus and a member of Doctors for Climate Health with the American Lung Association, discusses how climate change is affecting human health, and what we can do to prevent a climate crisis.

Dr. Bekkar just recently left his San Diego medical practice to devote his time to local and global environmental issues. Last spring, he completed Climate Reality Leadership Training, which included instruction from Vice President Al Gore and some of the nation’s leading climate scientists.

“Having been a physician for nearly 30 years not only helps me to understand the risks that a destabilized climate poses to life on earth, but it also gives me the authority and access to the audiences that  need to hear this message,” said Bekkar. “Put another way, as an obstetrician, I worked to preserve human life and helped new ones get started. As a climate activist, I’m working to preserve human health and to preserve nature, which is necessary for our survival as well as our happiness.”  Read more…

Geisel Library Exhibit Sheds Light on Chinese Workers Who Built Transcontinental Railway

Image3

Chinese work group for the Great Northern Railway, c. 1909. (Photo courtesy of Royal British Columbia Museum)

The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental, produced by the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford University, is on display through February 29, 2016 in Geisel Library on the University of California, San Diego campus. The exhibit tells the undocumented story of thousands of Chinese migrants, who played an instrumental role in the construction of the nation’s first transcontinental railway in the 1860s.

In addition to the partnership with the Chinese Historical Society of America and the Chinese Railroad Workers Project at Stanford, the Chinese American Library Association’s Task Force on Chinese Railroad Workers, which seeks to increase awareness and appreciation for the contributions of Chinese Americans, helped to bring the exhibit to the campus.

A reception will be held on Friday, January 22, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library, to celebrate the opening of the exhibit at the UC San Diego Library, the first institution to host the exhibit after its debut last summer at Stanford University and the Chinese Historical Society of America. The reception will include remarks from: Hilton Obenzinger, associate director of the Chinese Railroad Workers Project and a Lecturer in American Studies & English at Stanford University; Simeon Man, a scholar of Asian American Studies and an assistant professor in UC San Diego’s Department of History; and Murray Lee, Curator of Chinese American History for the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum. The event is free and open to the public. To make a reservation, please visit: http://lib.ucsd.edu/ironroadRead more…

Holocaust Living History Workshop Series Continues with “Holocaust Journeys”

Charlotte_Salomon

Work by German-Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon who died at Auschwitz in 1943.

The 2015-16 Holocaust Living History Workshop (HLHW) series continues this January with six compelling authors, films, and other events highlighting the diverse “Holocaust Journeys” of survivors and others recounting their personal stories. Co-sponsored by the University of California, San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Jewish Studies Program, the HLHW lecture series invites local Holocaust survivors, witnesses, relatives, and scholars to share their personal stories and memories with students and interested members of the public. The goal of the program is to broaden understanding of the past, foster tolerance, and preserve the memory of victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

All events are free and open to the public, and are held on Wednesdays on the UC San Diego campus in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room from 5 to 7 p.m., with some exceptions (as noted below).

January 13Think Only of Today: A Documentary Film about the Life of Holocaust Survivor, Max Garcia (With Alberto Lau and Robert Schneider)

Think Only of Today traces the life of Max Garcia from his childhood in Amsterdam, through the Holocaust, and finally to his immigration and life in the United States. Born in 1924, Max was interned in Westerbork before being deported to Auschwitz and later Mauthausen. The documentary, which follows Max’s ordeal through war and incarceration, also explores the effect of the Holocaust on succeeding generations. Interviews with Max’s children and grandchildren reveal the different ways individuals from each generation have grappled with the burden of such a searing experience.

February 10Exile in Ecuador (With Moselio Schaechter)

Moselio Schaechter spent his childhood in Mussolini’s Italy. Thanks to a transit visa for Portugal and the United States, the Schaechters made it to Quito, Ecuador in January 1941. Over the next nine years, Moselio struggled to accommodate his Jewish identity with a nascent South American self. In this talk he shares memories of his youth, his experience in the Ecuadorian Jewish refugee community, his life in the U.S., and his subsequent visit to his old “home.” Schaechter is a distinguished professor emeritus at Tufts University and an adjunct professor in microbiology at SDSU and UC San Diego. Read more…

Beyster Family Donates Papers of SAIC Founder J.R. Beyster to UC San Diego Library

2-BobBeysterPapers of the late J. Robert “Bob” Beyster, founder of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and a business innovator who developed a successful blueprint for entrepreneurial, employee-empowered companies, are being donated to the UC San Diego Library by the Beyster family.

Beyster’s papers, which reflect his passion for entrepreneurship and employee-owner enabled entrepreneurial practices, include correspondence, SAIC business records, committee meeting minutes and materials related to employee ownership, as well as records on a broad range of government-funded research and development, including Strategic Air Command during the Cold War, safety of the international space station, critical hull design for a number of U.S. entries in the America’s Cup race, clean-up of Three Mile Island, commercialization of the Internet, and many other transformational programs. The collection will also contain his more than 60 technical publications and a complete record of the numerous awards and recognitions he received for his public service, global leadership in science and technology, and entrepreneurship.

After the materials are processed, the Beyster Papers will be housed in the UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections, where they will be available for use by scholars, researchers and educators. The Beyster family has also provided funding to facilitate the processing of the archival materials to make them available for research and discovery online via the Web. The collection is expected to be made available to the public in 2017. Read more…

Papua New Guinea Photos Now Online

Edwin Hutchins

Anthropologist Edwin Hutchins uses tape recorder and takes notes while talking with young child.

Nearly 1,000 photographs depicting life in Papua New Guinea are now available for viewing on the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website: lib.ucsd.edu/hutchins, photographs taken in the context of anthropological research in Papua New Guinea’s Trobriand Islands.

In 1975, anthropologist Edwin Hutchins and his wife, Dona, arrived on Kiriwina in the Trobriand Islands, where they would spend the next year conducting anthropological research. They took nearly 1000 photographs, depicting many aspects of social life and material culture, including mortuary exchanges, the construction and sailing of canoes (including elaborate kula canoes), and the fabrication of colorful fiber skirts. Ed Hutchins’ Kiriwina research resulted in his dissertation, Reasoning in discourse: an analysis of Trobriand Island land litigation (Ph.D., UCSD 1978).

The Hutchins have generously made their photographs available to the UC San Diego Library, for inclusion in the Library’s Digital Collections. Anthropology graduate student, Jordan Haug, supplied the descriptions for each of the images, in collaboration with Hutchins, a professor emeritus of Cognitive Science.

Besides their intrinsic value, the photographs offer insight on the study of Trobriand culture and history. They also provide an intriguing contrast with photographs taken in the Trobriands between 1915-1918 by Bronislaw Malinowski, one of the pioneers of 20th century anthropology. Malinowski was the first of many anthropologists to conduct long-term fieldwork in the Trobriands.

All UC San Diego Libraries CLOSED December 24 – January 3

From Thursday, December 24, 2015 to Sunday, January 3, 2016, ALL UC San Diego Library buildings, including the Geisel Library and the Biomedical Library, will be CLOSED. Library buildings will reopen on their regular academic quarter schedules on Monday, January 4, 2016.

Information about Library services available during the holiday closure can be found at: lib.ucsd.edu/library-holiday-closure. Most online resources such as electronic journals, electronic books, and databases will remain accessible during the closure. Faculty, staff, and students can access library-licensed resources via the campus proxy server or VPN.

The UC San Diego Library wishes everyone a healthy and happy holiday season.

37_2015-WinterClosure

Journalist Bob Woodward to Discuss New Book The Last of the President’s Men on Dec. 4 at UC San Diego

Sold-out event to feature Woodward and Nixon Aide Alexander Butterfield discussing new Watergate revelations and the scandal’s lasting impact on presidential politics.

woodward1

Award-winning journalist and author Bob Woodward will visit the University of California, San Diego on Friday, December 4, 2015 for a lively conversation with Alexander Butterfield, a former aide to President Nixon and the subject of Woodward’s newest book The Last of the President’s Men. The book, which Simon & Schuster released this October, offers up new revelations and insights into Nixon’s psyche and the inner workings of his White House.

The UC San Diego Library and Helen Edison Lecture Series are sponsoring the sold-out event, which starts at 7:00 p.m. in the Price Center East Ballroom on the UC San Diego campus. A book signing for members of the audience will take place in the adjacent Muir Room following the program.

The conversation between Woodward and Butterfield, a long-time La Jolla resident who served as an aide to Nixon from 1969 to 1973, will focus on Watergate and how the political scandal continues to loom over and shape presidential politics. Read more…

“The Legacy of Jonas Salk” Exhibit on Display at Geisel Library thru Jan. 10, 2016

1

Pictured above is Jonathan Salk, who is on the receiving end of the polio vaccine, being administered by his father, in 1955.

Fall 2015 marks the close of world-renowned scientist Jonas Salk’s centenary year. To mark the occasion, the UC San Diego Library is presenting “The Legacy of Jonas Salk,” an exhibition of materials from the Jonas Salk Papers, which will be on display in Geisel Library through January 10, 2016. The papers—which comprise more than 600 linear feet (or nearly 1000 boxes)—were donated to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections in 2013 by Salk’s sons, Peter, Darrell, and Jonathan, all of whom—like their father—trained as physicians and are involved in medical and scientific activities.

According to Lynda Claassen, director of the Library’s Special Collections & Archives Program, the papers document Jonas Salk’s professional and scientific activities from the mid-1940s to his death in 1995.  Especially well-documented are activities related to the development of the Salk polio vaccine in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and the founding of the Salk Institute. The papers cover general correspondence, files relating to polio, his writings and philosophy, photographs, artifacts—including two dictating machines—personal writings, and various research materials.

“The archive represents the enormous scope of our father’s creativity and productivity,” said Jonathan Salk. “This collection of his papers and the insight to be gained into how he approached and solved problems might be his greatest legacy. He would be pleased to find that his life’s work was continuing to do good for the world. Read more…

‘Lover of Knowledge’ Supports his Passion through an Estate Gift to the Library

Pat Ford

Pat Ford has been a book collector and lover of knowledge for as long as he can remember. After settling in Rancho Santa Fe in the 1980s, he had the good fortune to meet Ken Hill, a neighbor and well-known book collector who was actively involved with the UC San Diego Library. He invited Pat to attend a meeting of the Library’s former Friends support group, and Pat accepted Ken’s invitation. Both men continued their passion for collecting and their involvement with the Library. Now, several decades later, Pat is still involved with the Library, and continues to nurture his intellectual passions by parlaying his knowledge of rare books and other materials and his love for music and history into productive hours of volunteer service and philanthropy.

Pat’s deep knowledge of and interest in early California history inspired him to volunteer in the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections, where he worked with the director, Lynda Claassen, for several years, focusing on special projects related to the Library’s California holdings.  These projects mirrored his own work on a bibliography of all historical publications related to J.C. Fremont and Kit Carson, explorers of the American West. Due to his keen interest in international relations, he also volunteered extensive time in the in the former branch library in the School of Global Policy and Strategy (formerly International Relations and Pacific Studies).

Through his long involvement with the UC San Diego Library, Pat has recognized the intrinsic value a library brings to undergraduate and graduate education, as well as the benefits local companies gain from the knowledge resources academic libraries provide. Armed with this understanding, Pat decided that he could continue to support the Library’s important mission not just through giving his time and talent, but by also making a philanthropic contribution.

Read more…

Older Posts »

Events Calendar

<< Jul 2014 >>
SMTWTFS
29 30 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2

Twitter Feed