Take the UC Undergraduate Experience Survey and Win Prizes!

Every student has a voice, let your voice be heard! The UC Undergraduate Experience Survey (UCUES)  is an official UC survey conducted every two years at all nine general UC campuses. The survey is a vital tool in learning about student experiences on campus, and how staff can improve undergraduate life. Campus staff and decision makers were alerted about affordability and diversity issues at UC San Diego following a study of the survey results. The Undergraduate Experience Survey has made an impact. Did you know the Triton Food Pantry was created after findings from UCUES?

When you complete the survey, you’re entered into prize drawings that include $40 Visa gift cards and a $250 Grand Prize. Several drawings will take place throughout the survey period, so the sooner you complete UCUES, the more chances to win. UCUES is also giving away four iPads and one Apple Watch each day during the first week of May for a total of five Apple prizes (one per day).

The next UCUES will not be offered again at UC San Diego until spring 2020. This will be your last opportunity, for some time, to have your voice heard through the UC Undergraduate Experience Survey.

Complete the survey today!

UC San Diego Physicist Flexes ‘BICEP’ to Introduce Controversial New Book

Brian Keating discusses how his work on a telescope at the South Pole led to a story about the world’s most prestigious award

In 1895 Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite sat at a desk in Paris and secretly wrote out his last will and testament. In that document, the man known to many as “the Merchant of Death” stipulated that his vast wealth be distributed in the form of yearly prizes to those who “have conferred the greatest benefit to mankind.” In the following years, the Nobel Prize would become the world’s most prestigious honor. Each December, thousands of the world’s elites arrive in Stockholm to dine on reindeer with the King of Sweden in celebration of the achievements of humankind.

Yet, as the University of California San Diego’s Brian Keating explains in his new book “there’s something rotten in Sweden.” Voted one of Amazon’s Best Books of the Month, “Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition, and the Perils of Science’s Highest Honor”  is described as a shot across the bow from Keating and a plea to reform the award that has captivated generations, but often comes at a high price.

Keating will be reading and discussing the book at several events in southern California, including a conversation at UC San Diego on April 25 at 5:30 p.m. in Atkinson Hall Auditorium, co-hosted by the Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination and the UC San Diego Library, a source for several of the historical photographs in the publication. A book signing and reception will follow the discussion. The event is free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. All books purchased at the event will receive a limited edition gold-plated bookmark, commemorating the book launch. Seating is not guaranteed. RSVP, here. Read more…

New Writing Series Features Fiction Writer, Native American Poet and UC San Diego faculty

UC San Diego’s New Writing Series is excited to announce their upcoming readings from Brian Evenson, Lily Hoang, Meliza Bañales and Layli Long Soldier. The events are free and open to the public!

Brian Evenson — Wednesday, April 11, 2018 — Geisel Library, Seuss Room at 4:30 p.m.

Evenson is the author of a dozen books of fiction, most recently the story collection “A Collapse of Horses” and the novella “The Warren.” He has also recently published “Windeye” and “Immobility,” both of which were finalists for a Shirley Jackson Award. His novel “Last Days” won the ALA-RUSA award. His novel “The Open Curtain” was a finalist for an Edgar Award and an IHG Award. He is the recipient of three O. Henry Prizes as well as an NEA Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. His work has been translated into French, Italian, German, Greek, Spanish, Japanese, Persian, Slovenian and Turkish. He lives in Los Angeles and teaches in the Critical Studies Program at CalArts.  Read more…

Geisel Library Renovations Forge Ahead This Spring

 

Shortly after the Fall Quarter began, construction crews got to work on a variety of projects to renovate the interior spaces of Geisel Library. Now that the academic calendar is turning to spring, many projects are nearing completion. Others will remain active for the next few months.

Here are the latest developments on all the Geisel Library building upgrades. Geisel’s 8th floor will remain closed through Spring Quarter 2018 in order to create an updated, modern space for individual study. Construction work is ongoing and the 8th floor is expected to reopen in August. Simultaneously, the restrooms on Geisel’s floors 4-7 continue to undergo renovation with the addition of new ADA-accessible and gender-neutral restrooms on each floor.

Throughout the course of the restroom renovations, Geisel’s floors 4-7 will remain open, and there will be restroom access on each floor at all times. Restroom renovations are expected to be completed in early June. Generally, construction will occur in one shift, from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Exceptions may occur and Library staff will notify users in advance when possible.

With the continuing need to provide quiet study space, Geisel’s 7th floor continues to serve as the temporary silent study floor during the closure of the 8th floor, and the Biomedical Library Building has been declared a Quiet Building indefinitely. The collection of oversized materials that was on Geisel’s 8th floor has been moved to the 6th floor. The Roger catalog can be used to find the current locations of any books.

The renovation of the 8th floor marks the next phase of the Geisel Library Revitalization Initiative (GLRI) which began in 2015 with the construction of Audrey’s Café. Responding to student, faculty and staff feedback, the renovation sets out to transform the interior public spaces of Geisel Library by dramatically enhancing the user experience through modern, technology-rich spaces that advance research and learning.

For the latest updates, visit lib.ucsd.edu/construction or follow our social media channels as the projects move along.

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility in Scholarly Communication

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility 
in Scholarly Communication
Thursday, April 19 • 2-4 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Shifting the scholarly culture toward open access, open data and open workflow is partly an incentives problem, partly an infrastructure problem, and partly a coordination problem.  The Center for Open Science (COS) is a non-profit technology and culture change organization working on all three. Central elements of COS’s strategy are to provide policy, incentive, and normative solutions that are applicable across institution, funder, publisher, and society stakeholders, and to provide efficient implementations of those solutions with open-source public goods infrastructure that is branded and operated by the communities themselves (OSF).

Brian Nosek is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, which operates the Open Science Framework. COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit, a multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition–thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one’s intentions and goals. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature’s 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information about the event, contact Serafin Raya at s1raya@ucsd.edu.

Rising from the Rubble: Creating POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

Catch the Buzz! Bee Exhibit Opens at UC San Diego Library

The UC San Diego Library is currently showcasing a bee exhibit in the Biomedical Library breezeway—just in time for spring!

The exhibit takes a closer look at the intricate world of these ecologically important insects through a plethora of information about the history of California bees. Part of the exhibit includes an interactive display of bee photographs taken under the microscope. In addition, the exhibit features a few selections from the rare collection of books documenting the history of beekeeping from Joe Bray who works as a cataloger for the Library’s Special Collections & Archives. Bray’s father studied beekeeping at UC Davis in the 1930’s and was a beekeeper in San Diego for many years.

But the highlight of the exhibit is a collection of bee specimens from San Diego’s coast, desert, and mountain areas collected by James Hung over a three-year period. Hung donated some of the specimens he amassed to the Library in 2014 while pursuing his Ph.D. at UC San Diego.

Since donating his collection to the Library, Hung and his colleagues have updated the San Diego County bee inventory to 700 species including about 70 taxonomically challenging ones, making San Diego a truly biodiversity hotspot for bees. The exhibit will be on display through the month of April.

For more information about the exhibit, please contact Scott Paulson at spaulson@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-5758.

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

2018 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 • 3:00 – 5:00 pm
Geisel Library, Classroom 2

This year, the UC San Diego Library is participating in the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon! Join us on Wednesday, March 14 in Geisel Library, Classroom 2 for an editing session to help improve Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism.

If you’re inexperienced – that’s ok! Tutorials will be provided for the beginner Wikipedian, along with reference materials and refreshments. There are Windows computers available in the library computer lab, but feel free to bring your laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation. For the editing-averse, we urge you to stop by to show your support. If possible, please create a Wikipedia account before the event. All are welcome!

Art+Feminism is a campaign improving coverage of cis and transgender women, feminism and the arts on Wikipedia. From coffee shops and community centers to the largest museums and universities in the world, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself and do-it-with-others campaign teaching people of all gender identities and expressions to edit Wikipedia. Less than 10% of editors on Wikipedia are women. Wikipedia is the largest and most popular general reference work on the internet with more than 40 million articles in more than 250 different languages. The fact is when we don’t tell our stories or participate in the ways our history is preserved, it gets erased. Gaps in the coverage of knowledge about women, gender, feminism, and the arts on one of the most visited websites in the world is a big problem and we need your help to fix it.

For more information about the event, contact Gayatri Singh, gasingh@ucsd.edu.

Voluminous Art: Treasures from San Diego’s University Libraries

Voluminous Art: Treasures from San Diego’s University Libraries
Saturday, March 10 – Monday, September 3, 2018
Mingei International Museum

This spring, Mingei International Museum will shine a spotlight on the special collections from the libraries of UC San Diego, San Diego State University and University of San Diego.

Voluminous Art celebrates the art of the book by showcasing approximately 25 volumes from each library collection, a sampling that will hint at centuries-old practices of book design, typography, binding and printing.

The oldest work on view will be a manuscript volume on the art and science of spelling from the 1200s. Many of the books will have been printed during the first 50 years after Gutenberg’s breakthrough with movable type, including the Nuremberg Chronicle. There will also be a portfolio of colored pictures hand drawn by a Kiowa Indian named Koba while he was imprisoned at a military facility in St. Augustine, Florida in 1876.

To honor his San Diego legacy, the Mingei will include a Dr. Seuss book with an original drawing by Theodore Geisel. Finally, there will be multiple examples of so-called artists’ books – contemporary creations,usually in very small, one-off editions of eccentric art works.

Special Collections & Archives’ Ledger Art Books Serve as Hands-On Learning Tool for Graduate Students

 

“Driving the Horses” plate from the Koba-Russell Sketchbook. Courtesy of: Plains Ledger Art Digital Publishing Project (PILA).

 

The beauty of Indian Ledger Art isn’t just about depicting Native American history in vibrant colors and powerful compositions, but how it has influenced the next generation of Native American artists.

To Dwayne Wilcox, it’s more than artwork. It connects him to his Native American culture and reaffirms his purpose in the community. Wearing black pants, a striped dress shirt that hangs loose on his frame, and his signature pork pie hat, Wilcox stands in front of an audience speaking softly about his art and gazing earnestly at the Ledger Art drawings in his exhibit.

Dwayne Wilcox

The Lakota Ledger artist met with students and spoke in November at a public gathering hosted by the Library in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. A small collection of Wilcox’s contemporary ledger artwork was on view in an exhibition called Teíč’iȟ iŋla: Practicing Decolonial Love, curated by UC San Diego graduate students. Wilcox was joined by Ross Frank, associate professor of ethnic studies and director of the Plains Indian Ledger Art project (PILA).

Due to increased collector interest, more nineteenth-century ledger books are coming to light. However, sheets are sold individually for thousands of dollars, dispersing them on the market. In the last few years academics have been trying to reassemble book pages. Many of these fine examples of ledger art drawings are now accessible online. PILA has been working since 1995 to digitally preserve Plains Indian Ledger books under one platform to promote research and public access.

“Without trying, this digital project has brought UC San Diego about a million dollars’ worth of original, nineteenth-century Ledger Art books. We have the third largest collection of complete ledger books in the country outside of the holdings at the Smithsonian museums,” said Frank. “The Library’s Special Collections & Archives has eight complete ledger books and another one is on its way. We have a fine example of the work that was done by the 28 artists of the 72 prisoners that were held in Fort Marion in 1875 during the Red River War.”

Pictured left to right: Special Collections & Archives Director Lynda Claassen, Alison Urban, Jessica Fremlan, Melanie West, and Ethnic Studies Associate Professor Ross Frank.

PILA provides graduate students pursuing a doctorate in Ethnic Studies and other programs with hands-on training in research, digital database, and web management. In addition, the Ethnic Studies department offers courses that give undergrads and graduate students the tools to design museum exhibits that incorporate indigenous knowledge.

“It was important to me that the exhibit we created not only be a visual experience but one that prompted critical discourse and engagement among visitors. In providing a space to write or draw thoughts and responses to the exhibit we hoped that a conversation could happen on these pages,” said UC San Diego graduate student Alison Urban. “I love flipping through the book and seeing how the questions we posed through the presentation of modern and historical Ledger Art have activated students to connect with the notion of decolonial love.”

The Library’s physical collection of Ledger Art books continues to grow, albeit slowly, given their scarcity and cost. But they provide a vital teaching and research resource, and the Library will continue to work with Ross Frank and Ethnic Studies to develop and promote these unique cultural materials.

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