Lingua – editors and editorial board resign

All six editors and all 31 editorial board members of Lingua, one of the top journals in linguistics, last week resigned to protest Elsevier’s policies on pricing and its refusal to convert the journal to an open-access publication that would be free online. As soon as January, when the departing editors’ noncompete contracts expire, they plan to start a new open-access journal to be called Glossa.    more

Open Access Without Tears

Is there a way to do good, respected research and still make it available to anyone in the world who wants to read it?

Actually, yes, in many cases. And it’s not necessarily that hard, though it does add extra steps and can require a bit of research up front.

Earlier this month, librarian Barbara Fister wrote a great article on ways to make your scholarship more open to researchers who don’t have the level of access that UC/UCSD affiliates have through our large number of journal licenses.


  • Tips on finding good open access journal publishers***
  • Self-archiving a copy of your article (often the final accepted manuscript) in a university’s institutional repository
    • For UCSD that would be eScholarship, and shortly we will have a mechanism in place that will make this process even easier. As your new articles are identified through searches in various databases, you’ll be prompted to “claim” them if they are indeed yours and then upload a copy or link out if the article is already open access elsewhere.
  • Potential OA options for book publishing, and even some ways to share and publicize even if the book itself isn’t OA.

*** For some publishers, article processing charge discounts–and in come cases, full waivers–are available to UCSD authors.

APS Begins Release of Public Access Papers

American Physical Society News: August 3 2015

As the clamor for open access to scientific research has intensified in recent years, a group of scientific publishers — of which APS is a member — responded in 2013 by creating the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS), which connects users with publicly accessible research on publishers’ websites. Now, APS is releasing the first wave of articles, making papers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) freely available through CHORUS effective August 1, several months ahead of the department’s official October 1 start date.  more …

Peer Review Week Sept 28 – Oct 2

“Peer review is a subject that – despite the fact that most researchers continue to trust it – divides opinion in the wider scholarly community. There is certainly much to discuss, but there is also much to celebrate!”

more in this Scholarly Kitchen blog post

Cataloging Librarian Rebecca Culbertson Wins ALCTS Award

Untitled-6Rebecca Culbertson, an Electronic Resources Cataloging Librarian at UC San Diego, has received the 2015 Ulrich’s Serials Librarianship Award from the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Culbertson is being honored for her achievements in serials librarianship, including mentoring a generation of catalogers and serving as “a champion for cataloging education.”

“Becky has truly made enormous contributions to cataloging,” said University Librarian Brian Schottlaender. “Her concept of using one bibliographic record for multiple providers of online serial titles—known as the Provider-Neutral concept—has become the accepted practice for online monographs as well. As a former cataloger myself, I have a great deal of respect for her work and am grateful for her many efforts.”

Culbertson began working for the UC San Diego Library (then the Undergraduate Library) in 1967, under Melvin Voigt, the University’s first University Librarian. She remembers seeing the Geisel Library under construction and the big move to the building after its completion in 1970. Technology, she recalls, was not what it is today: “There was not even a functioning Xerox machine.” Originally from Lansing, Michigan, Culbertson graduated from Kalamazoo College and the University of Michigan School of Library Science. She worked as a cataloger at the University of Michigan for three years, and then did a six-month stint at the University of Georgia, while her husband was in Naval Supply Corps School.

Culbertson will be honored and formally presented with her award—which includes $750 from ProQuest—on June 27 at the ALCTS awards ceremony at the ALA’s 2015 Annual Conference in San Francisco. Maria Collins of North Carolina State University’s Hunt Library is receiving the award along with Culbertson. As a longtime mentor to many budding catalogers over the years, Culbertson’s advice is simple: Learn to make effective use of the catalog. After 50 years, she is still enthusiastic about librarianship and finds the future of library and information work—“the steady drumbeat of the move towards Open Access both through local digitization efforts and repositories”—exciting.

Among her many contributions to the field, she has been an active contributor to CONSER and Program of Cooperative Cataloging (PCC) task groups, and has worked tirelessly to develop and promote clear standards for the cataloging and communication of serials information, as well as the effective presentation of journals though accepted standards.

New Open Access Programs from UC Press

University of California Press Expands into Open Access with Innovative Journal and Monograph Programs

UC Press today announces Collabra and Luminos, two new open access programs for journal and monograph publishing. Aligned with UC Press’s mission to build reach and impact for transformative scholarship, the programs expand publishing options for scholarly authors and researchers, make it easier for readers to find and use content, and share the monetary value generated from publishing across the academic community. Both Collabra and Luminos launch with a distinguished group of advisory board members, editors, authors, and reviewers from universities and associations around the globe.

Read more…

What Is Open Access? / Being Open As an Early Career Researcher

From Erin McKiernan, Being Open As an Early-Career Researcher, presented UT Austin, October 17, 2014, and earlier this year at SPARC.

And from PhD Comics, Open Access Explained.


Open Access Week


Oct 20-26 is International Open Access Week

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward. 

This week you can attend an Oct 22 information session about the UC Open Access policy that goes into effect November 1, or the “Generation Open” graduate student talk on Oct 24.  Find out more about Open Access at UCSD.

Generation Open: The Value of Openness – Graduate Student Event, 10/24


Are you an advocate for free access to publications, education materials, and data? Then you’re an advocate for Open Access!

The theme of Open Access Week this year (October 20–26) is “Generation Open.” The focus is on “highlighting the importance of students and early career researchers as advocates for change in the short-term, through institutional and governmental policy, and as the future of the Academy upon whom the ultimate success of the Open Access movement depends.”

That means you! Graduate students *are* the future of the Academy.  The extent to which you, and other early career researchers, support making research results freely accessible will affect not only your careers but the whole academic landscape.

Come join a discussion of Open Access on Friday, October 24th, 10-11 am in the Biomedical Library Events Room. Speakers will include Eric Bakovic, Linguistics Professor and Chair of the Committee on Library; Maryann Martone, Neurosciences Professor in Residence and Force 11 President; and Nancy Stimson, Scholarly Communications Coordinator for the Library. Coffee and snacks will be provided.

If you have any questions about this event, please contact Nancy Stimson at or (858) 534-6321.

Presentations on UC Open Access Policy – Oct 22 and Nov 3

The Library will host 2 presentations for faculty, staff and others who want to learn more about the new UC Open Access Policy (which takes effect at UCSD on November 1) and how to deposit their articles in eScholarship.

Please RSVP here. You can also contact your subject librarian directly for individual assistance on uploading articles.

  • October 22, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, Geisel Library Building, Seuss Room, or
  • November 3, 2014, 2:00-3:30 pm, Geisel Library Building, Seuss Room

What does “deposit their articles” mean?

For any article covered by the policy, faculty should deposit the author’s final version in eScholarship (UC’s open access repository) or deposit it in another OA repository and provide eScholarship with a link. If your publisher requires you to opt out in order to publish with them or if you want to opt out of the policy for a particular article or another reason, you can do that on the waiver and embargo page.

The UC Open Access Policy was passed last year by the UC Academic Senate to ensure “that future research articles authored by faculty at all 10 campuses of UC will be made available to the public at no charge.”

Each Faculty member grants to the University of California a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, for the purpose of making their articles widely and freely available in an open access repository. Any other systematic uses of the licensed articles by the University of California must be approved by the Academic Senate. This policy does not transfer copyright ownership, which remains with Faculty authors under existing University of California policy. (Policy)

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