Library to Hold Book Launch for New Dr. Seuss Book July 28

WhatPetShouldIGet_COVER

Join us on Tuesday, July 28 in the Geisel Library’s Seuss Room Foyer from 11 am – 1 pm to celebrate and buy a copy of the new Dr. Seuss book, What Pet Should I Get?. The book, based on recently discovered materials given to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections’ Dr. Seuss Collection, will be released by Random House on July 28. Copies of the book will be sold by the UC San Diego Bookstore and some of the original materials used in the book will be on display. “Boids & Beasties,” the annual exhibition of original drawings and sketches by Theodor Seuss Geisel, is also currently on view and includes original materials from the new book. Lemonade and animal crackers will be served!

Seuss Room Screening – 1915 Expo

Expo movie poster

Bring your lunch for a virtual picnic in the Park with a vintage screening of the original opening ceremonies of Balboa Park!

Step back in time 100 years to relive the moment when San Diego commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal and launched the City as an international venue.

Join us in the Seuss room on Friday, June 19, 2015 for refreshing drinks starting at 12:30 p.m. Then grab a seat on a picnic blanket to enjoy your lunch while viewing two exquisite vintage silent films, A Glimpse of the San Diego Expo (1915) and Fatty and Mabel at the San Diego Exposition (1915). As a special treat, the Fatty Arbuckle film will be shown on a 16mm projector at the appropriate silent film speed of 16 frames per second. Both screenings will be accompanied by live music from the era and other sounds from the Library’s very own musical group, Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra (TTPO).

This special screening is in conjunction with San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives on display in Geisel Library (2nd Floor West). Sheet music found in this exhibit will also be performed at the event by TTPO.

‘San Diego Welcomes the World’ Salutes Centenary of Panama–California Exposition of 1915

PanamaExhibit-6v2

San Diego Welcomes the World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, which commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal, and launched the City as an international venue. The construction of the Panama Canal was an immense engineering feat, dramatically cutting the distance and cost of international shipping by opening a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It also proved to be an excellent opportunity for enhancing San Diego’s profile–as it would become the first port north of the Panama Canal on the West Coast of the United States.  The event also provided San Diego leaders with the impetus for transforming Balboa Park from an undeveloped, arid property, into a lush and distinctly Spanish paradise. The 1915 Exposition led to both the greening of Balboa Park as well as the creation of the park’s cultural institutions and stunning Spanish Revival architecture.

The exhibition, which is on display on the main floor in Geisel Library (2nd floor, West Wing) until July 5, 2015, includes images of some of the few permanent structures designed for the fair, including the California Tower and dome, the Cabrillo Bridge, and the Spreckels Organ Pavilion. Other items in the exhibit include souvenir books and postcards, newspaper articles, sheet music, a special student admittance pass, maps of the Canal, and more.

Archive for New Poetry Previews Audio Clips from Blackburn Collection

BVR_Final_Carousel

Join us for this “virtual reading” that will feature newly digitized recordings from the large archive of poetry readings created by poet and translator Paul Blackburn [1926-1971]. Blackburn played an important role in the New York poetry community, and his archive has been described as “the most comprehensive oral history of the New York poetry scene between the late 1950s and 1970.”

Thursday, May 7
4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Seuss Room, Geisel Library

The readings that Blackburn recorded are now being digitized by the UC San Diego Library. They were indexed soon after their acquisition in 1973 by UC San Diego Literature Professor Michael Davidson, who had recently been hired as the first curator of the Archive for New Poetry and who was instrumental in acquiring the final segment of Blackburn’s papers. During his tenure as curator, he built the Archive for New Poetry into one of the world’s preeminent collections documenting experimental post-WW II poetry and has continued to promote it and to advise the Library on its subsequent development. The event will honor Davidson’s many contributions to the Library over the past 40 years. An exhibit of his own works and manuscripts will be on display at the reception following the reading. This event is free and open to the public.

Read more…

New Collection Endowments Provide Vital Support for the Library

Collection endowments have been critical in supporting and growing the Library’s collections, ensuring that the Library’s information resources will be maintained and enhanced in perpetuity. Over the years, supporters of the UC San Diego Library have established more than 50 collection endowments that support academic disciplines and intellectual interests. Recently, several collection endowments have been enhanced or newly established—including one from a long established San Diego family, as well as endowments from a UC San Diego faculty member and an alumna.

Robert and Fredricka Driver

Robert and Fredricka Driver

In December 2014, a significant gift was made by the children of Robert and Fredricka Driver to strengthen the Fredricka Driver Endowment Library Fund. This endowment was established in 1986, in conjunction with an NEH matching grant by long-time San Diegan and civic leader, Robert “Bob” Driver, in honor of his wife, Fredricka, best known as Freddie.

“My parents had a deep love of learning and were thrilled when UC San Diego was established in 1960, in a location so close to their Del Mar home,” said Sandy Driver-Gordon. “My mother especially appreciated what an education could bring, as she attended Pomona College at a time when women generally did not pursue higher education.”

The Driver family also demonstrated their generosity to the San Diego community in numerous ways. Bob—founder of one of San Diego’s most prominent independent insurance brokerage firms—was a major supporter of Project Concern (now Project Concern International), a humanitarian, San Diego-based non-profit, and also ran for a number of political offices. Freddie’s many charitable activities included volunteering as head of the San Diego Girl Scouts and Door of Hope, a home for unwed mothers.

“With this recent gift, the Driver endowment is now one of the Library’s largest collection endowments and provides significant support for the humanities materials. We thank the Driver family for their continued commitment to the Library and the University,” said University Librarian Brian Schottlaender. “We are also very grateful to Pamela Newcomb and Clare and Paul Friedman for their support.”

In addition to the Driver family, a new endowment—the Pamela Newcomb Library Collection Endowment—has been established by UC San Diego alumna Pamela Newcomb, in support of humanities collections. Pamela graduated in 1981,

Pamela Newcomb

Pamela Newcomb

with a degree in history and classical studies and felt that the Library supported her studies in a very meaningful way.  “I am enthusiastic to be able to create this endowment in support of the humanities collections,” said Pamela. “The Library was so important to my educational experience at UC San Diego and I feel fortunate that I can now support the excellence of the information resources available to future generations of students, faculty, and the general public.” Pamela’s gift will help nurture a new generation of humanities scholars who can take advantage of cutting-edge research materials in classical studies, history, art, philosophy, literature, music, and other topics that form many cultural heritages.

A second collection endowment was established by long-time Library supporters, Paul and Clare Friedman, whose endowment provides unrestricted support for the Library’s general research collections. Paul Friedman is a professor emeritus at UC San Diego; Clare Friedman is a retired faculty member at USD.

Paul and Clare Friedman

Paul and Clare Friedman

“We are delighted to establish the Paul and Clare Friedman Library Collection Endowment at the UC San Diego Library,” said the Friedmans.  “As emeriti faculty and lifelong readers, it means a great deal to us to support the Library’s collections and their vital role in fueling discovery and learning at UC San Diego and beyond.  We have supported the Library for many years and felt it was the right time to create an endowed fund that will impact the resources available to students and faculty for generations to come.  We encourage others to do the same!”

If you are interested in providing collection endowment support to the UC San Diego Library, please contact Julie Sully, Director of Development, at 858-822-4554 or jsully@ucsd.edu.

“Germans in the Pacific World” Examines Influence of Explorers

Man Standing By Shore I

Germans in the Pacific World, an exhibition of materials from the Library’s Special Collections & Archives, traces the trajectories of German explorers, missionaries, entrepreneurs, and others, who ventured into the Pacific to explore that ocean’s vast landmasses and numerous islands. The exhibit, which is on display in Geisel Library thru the end of spring quarter, depicts the myriad ways the German presence shaped the region’s history, and led to the creation of newly documented knowledge about the peoples, geography, fauna, and flora in and around the Pacific.

Germans in the Pacific World was curated by Professor Ulrike Strasser and graduate student Sky Johnston, of the UC San Diego History Department. The exhibit was mounted to coincide with an international symposium on “Germans in the Pacific World from the Late 17th to 20th Century,” which examined knowledge transfer from the early modern period through the 19th and 20th centuries.

Materials in the exhibit include early depictions and descriptions of California’s people, landscape, mineral riches, and animals, ranging from the first European map of the California peninsula produced in 1702, to the large atlas issued to accompany the Voyage de Humboldt et Bonpland, led by the famous German explorer, Alexander v. Humboldt.

Also included are texts and images associated with 19th and 20th century German travelers, colonialism, and racial science, as well as a volume on birds of California and the Sandwich Islands, the name given by Captain James Cook to the Hawaiian Islands. The book depicts the majestic white Pelican and other Pacific birds, which caught the attention of German zoologists and explorers.

Pelican I

Jellyfish I

 

California drew many German immigrants to its coast during and long after the Gold Rush. One such man, Paul Alexander, recounted his experiences and offered his views on California and its peoples in print. This volume of helpful information for prospective travelers and immigrants appeared in a series of handbooks pitched to Germans for one mark per volume. Earlier volumes included guides to Wisconsin, Argentina, and Canada, and an introduction to the English language. The Pacific coast was the new frontier. Accordingly, Alexander’s account of California was followed with a book on Oregon. As seen here, the volume was small enough for a traveler to carry on his person.

New Exhibition of Dr. Seuss’s Original Drawings

The UC San Diego Library is proud to feature a new exhibition of selected original drawings by beloved children’s author, Dr.Seuss Boids BeastiesTheodor Seuss Geisel, on the main floor of the Geisel Library at UC San Diego through October 19, 2014.  The new exhibit, Dr. Seuss’s Boids & Beasties, showcases his whimsical and fantastical creatures, and creative talent.

The Library’s Special Collections & Archives is home to the renowned Dr. Seuss Collection. The Dr. Seuss Collection contains original drawings, sketches, proofs, notebooks, manuscript drafts, books, audio- and videotapes, photographs, and memorabilia. The approximately 8,500 items in the collection document the full range of Dr. Seuss’s creative achievements, beginning in 1919 with his high school activities and ending with his death in 1991.

The Dr. Seuss Collection is often featured in library exhibitions, including those celebrating the naming of Geisel Library in December, 1995, and annually for Dr. Seuss’s birthday on March 2.

UC San Diego Library Receives Personal Papers of Jonas Salk

Media Contact:  Dolores Davies, 858-534-0667 or ddavies@ucsd.edu

The University of California, San Diego Library has become the official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk, noted physician, virologist, and humanitarian, best known for his development of the world’s first successful vaccine for the prevention of polio.              Salk1

The papers—which constitute almost 600 linear feet (or nearly 900 boxes)—were recently donated to the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections by Salk’s sons, Peter, Darrell and Jonathan, all of whom, like their father, trained as physicians and are involved in medical and scientific activities.

Salk2While recognized world-wide for his significant contributions, Jonas Salk is particularly noted locally for his founding of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies adjacent to UC San Diego and the impact this had on the city’s metamorphosis into a major center for biomedical and scientific research and discovery. The Institute will celebrate the Jonas Salk Centenary in the fall of 2014 and, as part of this notable milestone, the Library will hold a major exhibition of the Salk Papers and collaborate with the Institute on other celebratory events.

“It is a great honor for the Library to be the official repository for Jonas Salk’s papers,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian at UC San Diego. “The UC San Diego Library’s Mandeville Special Collections houses the papers of some of the world’s most prominent and accomplished scientists, including Francis Crick, Stanley Miller, and Leo Szilard, as well as Nobel Laureates Harold Urey, Hannes Alfven, and Maria Goeppert Mayer. The papers of Jonas Salk are an excellent complement to these materials.”

The Salk papers constitute an exhaustive source of documentation on Salk’s professional and scientific activities. The papers cover the period from the mid-1940s to his death in 1995; best documented are activities largely related to the development of the Salk polio vaccine in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and the founding of the Salk Institute. The papers cover general correspondence, files relating to polio, his writings, photographs, artifacts—including two dictating machines—personal writings, and various research materials.   Salk4

The collection includes correspondence with a number of prominent scientists and others,  including Basil O’Connor and officers of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis/March of Dimes; immunologists Thomas Francis and Albert Sabin; physicist and biologist Leo Szilard; mathematician and philosopher Jacob Bronowski; architect Louis Kahn and other important figures in the worlds of art, science, education, public administration, and humanitarianism.

Salk came to La Jolla following a career in clinical medicine and virology research. After obtaining his M.D. degree at the New York University School of Medicine in 1939, he served as a staff physician at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He then joined his mentor, Dr. Thomas Francis, as a research fellow at the University of Michigan. There he worked to develop an influenza vaccine at the behest of the U.S. Army. In 1947, he was appointed director of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of  Pittsburgh School of Medicine, where he began to put together the techniques that would lead to his polio vaccine.

Salk3Salk’s research caught the attention of  O’Connor, then president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, and the organization decided to fund his efforts to develop a killed virus vaccine against the most frightening scourge of the time—paralytic poliomyelitis. Given the fear and anxiety that polio caused during the first half of the century, the vaccine’s success in 1955 made Salk an international hero, and he spent the late 1960s refining the vaccine and establishing the scientific principles behind it.

Salk chose San Diego as the site for what was to become the Salk Institute for Biological Studies after a year touring the country for the right location. In June, 1960, through a referendum, the citizens of San Diego overwhelmingly voted to make a gift of 27 pueblo lots in the La Jolla area, just west of the new University of California San Diego campus, for Salk’s dream. The Institute began operation in temporary quarters in 1963, and permanent buildings designed by architect Kahn were completed in 1967. The complex soon gained international fame for its extremely modern and austere design, which now enjoys a cult following among architecture and design buffs. Salk served as the Institute’s director until 1975.

 

UC San Diego Library Receives Gift of New Dr. Seuss Materials

Annual birthday celebration set for March 3rd with exhibit of new materials.   DrSeuss7_2014

Every year the University of California, San Diego Library, the world’s repository for the original works of Dr. Seuss, holds a campus birthday party to celebrate the March 2 birthday of Dr. Seuss. The party will be held at noon on Monday, March 3, but it’s the UC San Diego Library that is getting the gift–a gift of more than 1500 additional items donated by Audrey Geisel from the personal archive of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known to the reading public as Dr. Seuss.

“I am pleased about more of Ted’s work and memorabilia being in Mandeville Special Collections at Geisel Library,” said Audrey Geisel. “His Seuss history will be preserved for posterity.”

DrSeuss4_2014 The recently donated materials, which are being added to the Dr. Seuss Collection in the Library’s Mandeville Special Collections, include hundreds of rough sketches and drawings for a variety of unpublished projects such as “Cat Ballooning,” “The Pet Shop,” “Bee Watches,” “How Welk Can You Spelk,” “The Clock Book,” and “Arabian Adventures.” Geisel’s ink drawings for a version of “Daisy Head Mayzie” are among the materials donated, as is “Tex McTarbox and the Fountain of Youth,” the latter, in Geisel’s words “the treatment for half of a screen play which I thought had great possibilities for mirth.”

“The UC San Diego Library is thrilled to receive this addition of creative materials to our fabulous Dr. Seuss Collection,” said Brian E. C. Schottlaender, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian. “We greatly treasure our Dr. Seuss materials and view Ted Geisel as much more than one of the most popular authors of children’s books. He is also a symbol of extreme creativity and DrSeuss1_2014 innovation, values that are part of this University’s DNA.”

In honor of Dr. Seuss’s birthday celebration, a selection of the new materials are now on display at Geisel Library and will continue to be exhibited until the end of March.

Images copyrighted by © Dr. Seuss Enterprises

UC San Diego Press Release

Public Beta Launch: UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections Website

We are excited to announce the public beta launch of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website.

The Digital Collections website contains more than 65,000 digital items that include documents, photographs, audio, video, and data sets that are unique to the UC San Diego Library.                          DAMS4

Unique Digital Collections include the Baja California Collection, the Dr. Seuss Collection, the Missions of Alta California, the Spanish Civil War Collection, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology, and UC San Diego History.

The Digital Collections also contain more than 6,000 digital objects of research data gathered by campus researchers as part of UC San Diego’s The Research Cyberinfrastructure Program.

We are in a test phase before replacing our current site: https://libraries.ucsd.edu/digital/ Help us by being a beta tester. We encourage you to use the “Help” menu of the site to report bugs or to submit any suggestions for improvement.

The new Digital Collections website incorporates responsive web design so you can browse the site on all your devices. Browse and discover the unique collections contained in our Digital Collections website at: Browse by Collection.

And, bookmark the UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website at:  http://library.ucsd.edu/dc

 

Older Posts »

Events Calendar

<< Aug 2015 >>
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5

Twitter Feed