Quantified Self and the Self-Tracking Movement

On May 30 from 12-1 pm, Ernesto Ramirez will speak about “Quantified Self and the Self-Tracking Movement” as part of the UC San Diego Biomedical Library lunchtime seminar series.

Quantified Self is “a movement to incorporate technology into data acquisition on aspects of a person’s daily life in terms of inputs (food consumed, quality of surrounding air), states (e.g., mood, arousal, blood oxygen levels), and performance (mental and physical).”  Self trackers share their methods, tools and results with one another in a variety of ways, including meetupsforums, and Quantified Self conferences.

Ernesto Ramirez is an organizer and community builder for Quantified Self. He is also working towards a Ph.D. degree in Public Health and is “developing the science of persuasive health technology” at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (CALIT2) and the UC San Diego Center for Wireless & Population Health Systems.

Space is limited so RSVP as soon as possible in order to reserve a seat. Feel free to bring a discreet lunch; cookies and water will be provided.

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Chocolate: My Favorite Vegetable

On October 4, 2012 from 12-1 pm, Dr. Beatrice A. Golomb will speak about “Chocolate: My Favorite Vegetable” as part of the UCSD Biomedical Library lunchtime seminar series.

Chocolate is a “vegetable.” It is a plant-based product, rich in “phytonutrients” and antioxidants, with health protective properties. Chocolate has long been viewed as an indulgence, and like many indulgences, has been presumed best avoided. But when the evidence is viewed, chocolate has repeatedly – defied supposition, producing favorable effects on (or bearing favorable associations to) blood pressure, blood sugar regulation, cholesterol profiles, heart disease, cognitive function, and (is it possible?) dental cavities. Favorable associations to longevity have even been documented. Still, trifling matters like lifespan have garnered far less attention than has the finding that regular chocolate consumption is linked – mirabile dictu to more favorable body weight. As is the case for many nutrients, regular consumption, not necessarily high quantity, shows the most favorable profile. In keeping with the contrarian character of evidence relative to supposition, the one outcome chocolate has been popularly presumed to benefit is the one which the evidence fails to support. Which one? Some mysteries must be left to the talk.

Beatrice Alexandra Golomb, MD, PhD is a Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego with a joint appointment in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. She has been lead investigator on a number of studies and clinical trials with research interests under two broad themes: medical reasoning; and the impact of oxidative stress and cell energetics in health, aging, and disease. Offshoots of the former interest include (among others) treatment/exposure risk-benefit balance, impact of conflict of interest on medical findings and information purveyal, why double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials are none of the above, and placebos. Branches of the latter interest include cholesterol and statin drugs, metabolic syndrome, aging, ALS, autism, and Gulf War illness, as well as antioxidant and pro-oxidant foods/nutrients/exposures such as coenzyme Q10, trans fats, pesticides – and, of course, chocolate. A number of her studies have been featured in national and international print, radio and television media, from the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and The Economist to Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show.” Space is limited so RSVP as soon as possible in order to reserve a seat. Feel free to bring a discreet lunch; cookies and water will be provided.

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From beliefs and spells to the scientific method: A long slow journey for the art of Medicine

Dr. Henry C. Powell, M.D., D.Sc. will present “From beliefs and spells to the scientific method: A long slow journey for the art of Medicine.” This lecture coincides with the UC San Diego Libraries’ hosting of “Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, & Medicine,” a traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine. The libraries will be hosting several events in connection with this exhibit.

From a room in a cupboard under the stairs to a room in a castle, the story of Harry Potter begins with the Sorcerer’s Stone (or Philosopher’s Stone in the UK) and sends a young boy on new adventures, both intellectual and physical. The foundation of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry sprung from the early Renaissance period and it is here where “muggle” reality intertwines with literary fiction. Science and medicine were developed and nurtured with lessons learned by experts in alchemy, botany, surgery, as well as theologians. Scientists from long ago include Paracelsus, Flamel, Paré, Harvey and they often benefited from the work of more familiar artists such as van Calcar, Michelangelo and Alberti.

The advance of human knowledge was not an easy road and it often required challenging the current “authority.” This often exacted a personal price. Medicine benefited from the growing understanding of botany, alchemy, anatomy, and art. This talk will fill in some of the details of why, even with this growing understanding, magic and the Philosopher’s Stone retained such enduring appeal. For the full talk abstract, please see http://tinyurl.com/sorcerorstone.

Dr. Powell is Professor of Pathology (Neuropathology) and directs the Clinical Electron Microscopy service at UC San Diego Medical Center.  He teaches medical and pharmacy students and co-directs the Histology and Pathology “threads” for the School of Medicine.  His work has focused on pathology of the peripheral nervous system and he has produced about two hundred publications related to his research interests in the effects of diabetes on the peripheral nervous system.  From 2006-2007 he served as chair of the divisional Academic Senate at UC San Diego, and from 2008-2010 as Vice Chair and Chair of the systemwide Academic Council and Faculty Representative to the UC Regents.  Dr Powell’s interests include the history of medicine as well as the history of recorded music.

Space is limited so RSVP at http://libraries.ucsd.edu/locations/bml/services/forms/event-reg.html as soon as possible in order to reserve a seat.  Feel free to bring a discreet lunch; cookies and water will be provided.

 

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Transforming the Healthcare Experience through the Arts

On March 22 from 12-1 pm, Blair L. Sadler, J.D. will speak about “Transforming the Healthcare Experience Through the Arts” in the Biomedical Library Events Room.

He will address how hospitals have discovered that there are many highly effective low cost ways to transform a patient’s health care experience using art, music and other techniques.

Mr. Sadler is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), and a member of the faculty at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady School of Management. He served as President and CEO of Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego from 1980 until 2006.

He served on the Board of the Center for Health Design for 18 years, and has been heavily involved in developing the business case for building better hospitals through evidence-based design.  He is the lead author of the article “Fable Hospital 2.0: the business case for building better health care facilities” (2011) on building optimally safe, low-stress hospitals through evidence-based design.

He is a Distinguished Fellow of the Society of the Arts in Health Care, and co-author of Transforming the Healthcare Experience through the Arts (2009).

Previously, he served as a Law Clerk for the Superior Court of Pennsylvania, medical-legal specialist for the National Institutes of Health, faculty member at Yale University, senior officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and senior executive at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation.  He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Hastings Center.  He is a graduate of Amherst College and the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Space is limited so RSVP as soon as possible in order to reserve a seat.  Feel free to bring a discreet lunch; cookies and water will be provided.

UPDATE: audio, slides and the video shown in the lecture are now online on our Events page.

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The Latest Buzz: Honey Bee Talk Slides and Audio Posted

The slides and audio from Dr. James C. Nieh’s April 19 talk about “The Decline and Fall of Bees:  Pollinators in Peril” has been posted on the UCSD Biomedical Library website (a link to the mp3 file is included for people who can not see the Flash audio player).  Enjoy!

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The Decline and Fall of Bees: Pollinators in Peril

On April 19, 2011 from 12-1 pm Dr. James C. Nieh will speak about “The Decline and Fall of Bees:  Pollinators in Peril” in the Events Room at the Biomedical Library.

Honey bees face multiple natural and manmade dangers in their environment.  Ironically, they are highly successful because of their use in modern agriculture, yet are suffering because modern agriculture imposes stresses from pesticides, diseases, parasites, and management practices such as mobile beekeeping.  The research in Dr. Nieh’s laboratory explores natural threats and, more recently, the effects of pesticides on honey bee foraging.  Come learn about the amazing solutions that bees have evolved in response to natural perils and how our use of pesticides may be contributing to their decline.

Dr. Nieh was born in Taiwan, but grew up in Southern California.  He received his B.A. at Harvard in 1991 and his PhD from Cornell University in 1997.  He subsequently received a NSF-NATO Postdoctoral fellowship to study at the University of Würzburg in Germany after which he received the prestigious Harvard Junior Fellowship.  In 2000, he joined the faculty in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he is currently a professor in the Section of Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution.  Dr. Nieh’s interests focus on bee communication and cognition.  He studies many types of social bees, including honey bees, bumble bees, and stingless bees.  Currently, his laboratory is interested in exploring the evolution of bee language, how bees communicate and recruit nestmates to food, and how pesticides and disease affect bee behavior, navigation, and communication.  More information about his laboratory’s research on bees can be found at http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/labs/nieh.

Space is limited so RSVP at http://libraries.ucsd.edu/locations/bml/services/forms/event-reg.html in order to reserve a seat.  Feel free to bring a discreet lunch.

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The Neurobiology of Wisdom

On August 17, 2010 from 12-1 pm Dr. Dilip Jeste will speak about “The neurobiology of wisdom” as part of the UCSD Biomedical Library lunchtime seminar series.

The concept of wisdom has been described since ancient times, primarily in religious and philosophical literature.  Empirical scientific research on wisdom has been a much more recent phenomenon. Dr. Jeste will review the conceptualization of wisdom in modern western literature, according to which wisdom is a uniquely human complex trait with several subcomponents including knowledge of life, emotional regulation, insight, pro-social behavior, value relativism, and decisiveness in the face of uncertainty. He will compare findings from our studies of the construct of wisdom based on an international expert consensus versus an ancient text of Hindu religion and philosophy – the Bhagavad Gita. Next, he will present a putative neurobiological model of wisdom that involves a balance between phylogenetically oldest and newest parts of the human brain – the prefrontal cortex and the limbic striatum, respectively. Finally, he will discuss the relationship of wisdom with aging, the associated neuroplasticity, and a speculation of the possible evolutionary significance of wisdom.

Dilip V. Jeste, M.D., is Estelle and Edgar Levi Chair in Aging, Director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, and Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego (UCSD).  He is also the Director of the Advanced Center for Innovation in Services and Intervention Research at UCSD, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and of the John A. Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatric Psychiatry. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and of the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the National Institutes of Health. He is the Principal Investigator on several research and training grants from federal and non-federal sources (including Summer Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry, a national research training program).  Dr. Jeste has published ten books and over 600 articles in peer-reviewed journals and books.  He is the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, and has also been on the editorial boards of several journals, including the American Journal of Psychiatry.  He is on the ISI list of the “world’s most cited authors”– comprising less than one half of one percent of all publishing researchers of the last two decades.

In case you wish to read about the topic before the talk, Dr. Jeste and his colleagues have published three articles:

Space is limited so RSVP as soon as possible in order to reserve a seat.  Feel free to bring a discreet lunch; cookies and water will be provided.

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Cohen Talk Slides and Audio Online

The presentation slides and audio from Seth Cohen’s talk, “View from the Top: The Intersection of Science and Policy in the Capital,” have been posted on the Biomedical Library events page.  Start the audio and then manually advance the slides.

In his presentation, Dr. Cohen discussed his year in Washington working as an AAAS Fellow in the Office of Science Technology and Policy (OSTP).  This talk was jointly sponsored by the Biomedical Library and the Science and Engineering Library, and was part of the Biomedical Library lunchtime seminar series.

Whenever possible, slides, audio and/or video associated with library talks are posted on the library’s events page.

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View from the Top: The Intersection of Science and Policy in the Capital

Dr. Seth Cohen will talk about his “View from the Top: The Intersection of Science and Policy in the Capital” on March 30, 2010 from 12-1 PM in the UCSD Biomedical Library Events Room.  This lunchtime seminar is jointly sponsored by the Biomedical Library and the Science and Engineering Library.

Dr. CohenSeth Cohen - web res is an Associate Professor in the UCSD Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.  He obtained a B.S. degree in Chemistry and a B.A. degree in Political Science from Stanford University.  He received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley and did his postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  He then moved to his present position at UCSD.  His research and teaching at UCSD has been recognized with an NSF CAREER award and a Cottrell Scholar Award from the Research Corporation.

During 2008-2009, he was on sabbatical leave in Washington D.C. as the recipient of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Roger Revelle Fellowship in Global Stewardship.   The Roger Revelle Fellowship is designed to engage practicing scientists in the science policy arena.  Named after one of UCSD’s founders, and Revelle College’s namesake, this fellowship focuses on issues of “global stewardship” such as climate change, environmental stewardship, sustainable energy, and renewable resources.

Dr. Cohen’s fellowship allowed him to obtain a position within the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP).  The OSTP director is the Presidential Science Advisor.  Dr.  Cohen served under two Presidential administrations and two OSTP directors:  Dr. John H. Marburger (Bush administration) during the first six months, and Dr. John Holdren (Obama administration) during the last six months.  While he was at OSTP, he worked on a number of subjects including Presidential transition for OSTP, energy, biomedical research, scientific awards, and scientific integrity.  Come hear Dr. Cohen share his insights and observations about his experiences in Washington, D.C.

Space is limited so RSVP as soon as possible in order to reserve a seat.  Feel free to bring a discreet lunch; cookies and water will be provided.

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James Fowler Talk – Audio and Slides Available

If you missed the talk that James Fowler gave on “Social Networks and How They Affect Our Health,” you can listen to the audio of the talk and review the slides at your leisure.

If you start the audio and then bring up the slides in a new window, you can page through the slides as the audio progresses.

You can either play the audio in your browser, or download the MP3 to your computer to play later or transfer to your MP3 player (Windows users: To download the MP3 file, right click on the download link and then use the “save” option).

Whenever available, we post the video, audio and/or slides from the UCSD Biomedical Library seminar series to our “BML Events and Exhibits” page.  We also post information about current and past exhibits that are displayed in the library breezeway.

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