Demystifying Open Access, a Panel Discussion for Graduate Students

Are you interested in learning more about the Open Access (OA) movement?  Are you mystified by the OA lingo (“green OA” vs. “gold OA,” “APCs,” “funder mandates,” etc.)?  Do you wonder about the pros and cons of making your dissertation or thesis available via open access?

On October 22, 2013, the UC San Diego Library is hosting a panel discussion called “Demystifying Open Access” which will be held from 3:30-5:00 pm in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library.

The speakers will include:

  • Dr. Eric Bakovic, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Linguistics Department
  • Dr. Kim Barrett, Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Medicine
  • Dr. Maryann Martone, Co-Director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, and Professor in Residence in the Department of Neurosciences
  • Dr. Stefan Tanaka, Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for the Humanities

Please join us for this illuminating discussion by some of the campus’s most knowledgeable people in this area.  Pizza and water will be served.

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UC San Diego Open Access Week Activities

Open Access Week 2013 (October 21-27) is almost here!  An international event, Open Access Week will begin on October 21 with a kickoff webinar, “Open Access: Redefining Impact,” hosted by Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. Among the topics to be discussed are Article Level Metrics (ALMs) and changing the way scholarly communication is measured. The speakers will include:

  • Dr. Stefano Bertuzzi, Executive Director of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)
  • Brett Bobley, Chief Information Officer for the National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Dr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association
  • Dr. Cameron Neylon, Advocacy Director for Public Library of Science
  • Dr. Michael Stebbins, Assistant Director for Biotechnology in the Science Division of the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy

This webinar will be streamed from 12 noon to 1 pm PST in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library.  Please join us if you can.

On October 22, from 3:30-5 pm, the UC San Diego Library is hosting a panel discussion for graduate students and others called “Demystifying Open Access.”  The purpose of this discussion, geared towards graduate students, is to focus on issues such as the basics of Open Access (OA), the OA lingo ((“green OA” vs. “gold OA,” “APCs,” “funder mandates,” etc.), and the pros and cons of making your dissertation or thesis available via open access.

The speakers will include:

  • Dr. Eric Bakovic, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Linguistics Department
  • Dr. Kim Barrett, Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Medicine
  • Dr. Maryann Martone, Co-Director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, and Professor in Residence in the Department of Neurosciences
  • Dr. Stefan Tanaka, Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for the Humanities

This discussion will also take place in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library.  Please join us for this illuminating discussion by some of the campus’s most knowledgeable people in this area.  Pizza and water will be served.

 

 

 

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Publishing in the 21st Century

On February 12, 2013, from 3:30-5:00 pm, Martin Frank, Executive Director of the American Physiological Society, will talk about “Publishing in the 21st Century” in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library.

Since the founding of Philosophical Transactions in 1665, journals have been the vehicle of choice for the dissemination of scientific knowledge.  Since that time, the number of active, peer-reviewed learned journals has expanded to approximately 28,000, collectively publishing over 1.8 million articles per year.  Of these, most are accessible via subscription and prior to the mid-1990s were only available on paper.  By the end of the 20th Century, most journals had moved their content to online platforms greatly increasing accessibility to scientific information.

Online dissemination served as the impetus for the open access (OA) movement and the call for free dissemination of the information contained in journals.  OA advocates adopted the words of Stewart Brand to develop their slogan, “Information wants to be free.”  They promoted their cause to legislative bodies by claiming, “The taxpayer paid for it, so the taxpayer shouldn’t have to pay again to read the content.”  The question is what has the taxpayer paid for and can information dissemination truly be free.

Martin Frank, Ph.D. has been the Executive Director of the American Physiological Society, Bethesda, MD since 1985.  In 2004, he helped found the Washington DC Principles Coalition for Free Access to Science, a Coalition that represents approximately 70 not-for-profit society and university press publishers.  Frank received his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1973 working under Dr. William W. Sleator.  He served as a research associate in the Cellular Physiology Laboratory, Michigan Cancer Foundation, Detroit, and in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.  In 1975, he joined the Department of Physiology, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, as an assistant professor.  From 1978-1985, he served as the Executive Secretary, Physiology Study Section, Division of Research Grants, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.  From 1983-1985, he was a Member, Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Washington, DC.  As part of the program, he served as a policy analyst in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Health, DHHS.

This talk is co-sponsored by The Center for the Humanities, The Library, and the Office of Graduate Studies and is another in a series of talks about the evolution of scholarly communication.  A reception will follow the talk at 5:00 pm.

 

 

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“Two problems in scholarly communication, and how to solve them”

On November 1, 2012, Stuart Shieber, James O. Welch, Jr. and Virginia B. Welch Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, will discuss “Two problems in scholarly communication, and how to solve them.”  The talk will take place in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library at UC San Diego, and will last from 3:30-5:00 pm with a reception following from 5:00-6:00 pm.

“In the sciences, research results are disseminated through the journal article. In the humanities, scholarly monographs are the predominant medium. Both distribution systems are exhibiting severe signs of distress, but the sources of the problems are quite different. I will describe the symptoms in the two modes of scholarly communication, diagnose the underlying problems, and propose treatments, some proven and some speculative.”

Professor Shieber’s primary research field is computational linguistics, the study of human languages from the perspective of computer science. His research contributions have extended beyond that field as well, to theoretical linguistics, natural-language processing, computer-human interaction, automated graphic design, the philosophy of artificial intelligence, computer privacy and security, and computational biology. He is the founding director of the Center for Research on Computation and Society and a director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

He received an AB in applied mathematics summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1981 and a PhD in computer science from Stanford University in 1989. He was awarded a Presidential Young Investigator award in 1991, and was named a Presidential Faculty Fellow in 1993, one of only thirty in the country in all areas of science and engineering. He has been awarded two honorary chairs: the John L. Loeb Associate Professorship in Natural Sciences in 1993 and the Harvard College Professorship in 2001. He was named a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence in 2004, and the Benjamin White Whitney Scholar at the Radcliffe Institute for 2006-07.

His work on open access and scholarly communication policy, especially his development of Harvard’s open-access policies, led to his appointment as the first director of the university’s Office for Scholarly Communication, where he oversees initiatives to open, share, and preserve scholarship.

This talk is sponsored by the UC San Diego Center for the Humanities.

Categories: events

Open Access Week 2009

oaday_icon11Today is the first day of Open Access Week 2009.  The purpose of Open Access Week is to broaden awareness of open access to research.  Here are some of the actions that you can take to understand and support open access:

  • Find out more about it.  View the video at http://vimeo.com/7048906 for an overview of the activities that are happening this week – or check out the Open Access Week 2009 blog at http://www.openaccessweek.org/
  • Consider publishing in a peer reviewed open access journal.  For instance, UC has a special agreement with Springer that allows UC authors to make their articles available via open access (“Springer Open Choice”) at no charge – http://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/alternatives/springer_faq.html
  • Explore the new UC eScholarship site, an open access repository, which debuts today:  http://escholarship.org Find out more about it by watching their video at http://animoto.com/play/CMUAhzp2fwpvnwSwFTdCOg
  • As an author, carefully read your copyright transfer agreement and negotiate to retain some of your rights – including the right to post your article in the eScholarship repository – http://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/manage/retain_copyrights.html
  • Find out more about which funding agencies have mandates that require funded authors to deposit their publications in open access repositories – http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/juliet/
  • Support the Federal Research Public Access Act which would make it mandatory for authors to make manuscripts reporting on federally funded research publicly available within six months of publication in a journal – http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/issues/frpaa/
  • Sign up for the free EDUCAUSE webinar, “Throwing Open the Doors: Strategies and Implications for Open Access,” October 23, 2009, 10-11 AM PST – http://net.educause.edu/live0919
  • Spread the word to your colleagues about why publishing in open access venues can increase the number of citations to their work.
  • Wear an open access button this week – pick up one at the UCSD Biomedical Library desk while supplies last!
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Open Access Day Takeaways

If you missed Open Access Day 2008 on October 14, don’t worry.  Here are some tangible takeaways:

  1. The webcasts of Sir Richard Roberts and Dr. Phil Bourne are on the web now.  Listen to them talk about what Open Access means to them and why it’s important.
  2. The “calls to action” or take-home messages are: USE open-access researach, SHARE your work, TAKE action, SHOW your support, GET connected
  3. Students: Check out the “Open Students: Students for Open Access to Research” site
  4. There are still lots of handouts, buttons and stickers left (PLoS, SciVee, eScholarship, Creative Commons, etc.).  Learn more about Open Access by requesting a free packet from Nancy Stimson at nstimson@ucsd.edu
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Participate in Open Access Day – October 14, 2008

Join in the campus festivities celebrating the first international Open Access Day on October 14. Building on the worldwide momentum toward Open Access for publicly funded research, Open Access Day will be an opportunity for the higher education community and the general public to understand more clearly the opportunities of wider access and use of content.

The main events will be two webinars which will be viewable in the Seuss Room at Geisel Library. The first one, broadcast at 4 PM Pacific time, will feature Sir Richard Roberts, joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1993 for discovering split genes and RNA splicing, one of 26 Nobel Prize winners to sign the Open Letter to U.S. Congress in support of taxpayer access to publicly funded research, currently Chief Scientific Officer at New England Biolabs, and a member of the PLoS Biology Editorial Board.

The second speaker will be our own Dr. Phil Bourne, Professor in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UCSD. Dr. Bourne is also Founding Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Computational Biology and the author of the popular PLoS Computational Biology “Ten Simple Rules” series. Dr. Bourne will be broadcasting his talk live from the Seuss Room at 7 PM Pacific Time.

Prior to each talk, there will be a brief viewing of the “Voices of Open Access” video series which includes key members of the research community talking about why Open Access matters to them. Following each talk, the speaker will answer questions from the public. Come for some of the events, or stay for the whole thing!

Other activities such as a contest for the best joke about Open Access, a contest for the best blogger entry about what Open Access means to you, and tables with materials describing how you can get involved are under development, so stay tuned.

Light refreshments will be served. No reservations are required. More information about Open Access Day is available at http://openaccessday.org/program or by contacting Nancy Stimson at (858) 534-6321 or nstimson@ucsd.edu

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